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The 1867 Reform Act
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The 1867 Reform Act

The 1867 Reform Act was the second major attempt to reform Britain's electoral process - the first being the 1832 Reform Act. The 1867 Reform Act is properly titled the Representation of the People Act 1867. There had been moves towards electoral reform in the early 1860's via Lord John Russell. However, his attempts were thwarted by Britain's most powerful politician of the time - Lord Palmerston who was against any form of change.

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Weapons and manpower

A vast amount of weapons and manpower were needed in World War Two. Figures for industrial production were massive in any of the main protagonists in the war. The total number of people called up during the war ran into tens of millions worldwide. The figures given below are some indication as to what was meant by 'total war' - when everything in a country was directed towards the war effort.
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Rudolf Diels

Rudolf Diels was the first chief of the Gestapo ( Ge heime Sta ats po lizei). Whereas it might be natural to see figures such as Himmler , Heydrich or Goering as being the first chiefs of such a feared organisation, its first leader was, in fact, the little known functionary Diels. Rudolf Diels was born in December 16 th 1900.
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Voting behaviour in the 1996 presidential election

1996 Dole Clinton Perot % % % All 41 49 8 Men 38 54 7 Women 38 54 7 Whites 45 44 9 Blacks 11 83 7 Hispanics 24 62 14 18-29 years 34 53 10 30-44 years 41 49 9 45-59 years 41 48 9 aged 60+ 44 48 7 Protestant 47 43 9 Catholic 37 54 9 Jewish 16 78 3 Liberals 11 78 7 Moderates 33 57 9 Conservatives 71 20 8 Related Posts Voting behaviour in the 1996 presidential election 1996 Dole Clinton Perot % % % All 41 49 8 Men 38 54 7 Women 38 54 7 Whites 45 44 9…Voting Behaviour in the 2000 election 2000 Category Bush Gore Nader % % % All 48 48 2 Men 53 42 3 Women 43 54 2 White 54 42 3…
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Voting behaviour in the 1996 presidential election

1996 Dole Clinton Perot % % % All 41 49 8 Men 38 54 7 Women 38 54 7 Whites 45 44 9 Blacks 11 83 7 Hispanics 24 62 14 18-29 years 34 53 10 30-44 years 41 49 9 45-59 years 41 48 9 aged 60+ 44 48 7 Protestant 47 43 9 Catholic 37 54 9 Jewish 16 78 3 Liberals 11 78 7 Moderates 33 57 9 Conservatives 71 20 8 Related Posts Voting behaviour in the 1996 presidential election 1996 Dole Clinton Perot % % % All 41 49 8 Men 38 54 7 Women 38 54 7 Whites 45 44 9…Voting Behaviour in the 2000 election 2000 Category Bush Gore Nader % % % All 48 48 2 Men 53 42 3 Women 43 54 2 White 54 42 3…
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Alfred Rosenberg

Alfred Rosenberg was arguably the leading ideologist of the Nazi Party. A close ally of Adolf Hitler, Rosenberg provided the Nazi Party with its anti-Semitic and racial ideologies using what Hitler had written in 'Mein Kampf' as the basis for his ideas. While Hitler expounded his own ideas, there is little doubt that he was influenced by some of Rosenberg's beliefs.
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Hjalmar Schacht

Hjalmar Schacht was the President of the Riechsbank in Nazi Germany. A supporter of Hitler, he was rewarded with the position in March 1933, just 2 months after Hitler was appointed Chancellor. Hjalmar Schacht was born on January 22 nd 1877 in Tingleff, Schleswig (now Tinglev in Denmark). Schacht did not come from an economics background as would befit a man who was to be put in charge of the main bank of Nazi Germany.
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USA presidents 1960

“En-gb”> USA presidents 1960 USA presidents 1960 - 2000 Year Candidate Popular Votes Electoral College Votes 1960 Kennedy - D Nixon - R 34,221,349 34,108,647 303 219 1964 Johnson - D Goldwater - R 43,129,484 27,178,188 486 52 1968 Nixon - R Humphrey - D Wallace - I 31,785,480 31,275,165 9,906,473 301 191 46 1972 Nixon - R McGovern- D 47,167,319 29,168,509 520 17 1976 Carter - D Ford - R 40,827,394 39,145,977 297 240 1980 Reagan - R Carter - D 43,267,489 34,964,583 489 49 1984 Reagan - R Mondale - D 53,428,357 36,930,923 525 13 1988 Bush - R Dukakis - D 48,881,278 41,805,374 426 111 1992 Clinton - D Bush - R Perot - I 44,908,233 39,102,282 19,741,048 370 168 0 1996 Clinton - D Dole - R Perot - I 45,628,667 37,628,435 7,874,283 379 159 0 2000 Bush - R Gore - D Nadar - Green Buchanan - Ref.
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Ernst Kaltenbrunner

Ernst Kaltenbrunner was Nazi Germany's most senior member of the SS to be captured alive at the end of the war. Kaltenbrunner was put on trial atNuremberg and sentenced to death for crimes against humanity. Ernst Kaltenbrunner was one of the most feared henchmen in Nazi Germany. Kaltenbrunner attained huge power during World War Two and became involved with the extermination camps and all that is associated with the Holocaust.
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Beliefs of the Republican Party

The Republican and the Democrat parties are at the very heart of American politics. For decades, presidents have been either Republican or Democrat and both parties dominate Congress. Therefore the beliefs and views of both parties have to impact the whole of American politics. The following is taken from the 1995 Republican Party's history of the party as presented by the Republican Party's National Committee.
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Military casualties of World War Two

Allied forces: Great Britain + Commonwealth 452,000 France 250,000 USA 295,000 USSR 13,600,000 Belgium 10,000 Holland 10,000 Norway 10,000 Poland 120,000 Greece 20,000 Yugoslavia 300,000 Czechoslovakia 20,000 China (from 1937 on) 3,500,000 Total 18,587,000 Axis forces: Germany 3,250,000 Austria 230,000 Italy 330,000 Rumania 200,000 Hungary 120,000 Bulgaria 10,000 Finland 90,000 Japan 1,700,000 Total 5,930,000 Total military casualties Allies + Axis forces = 24,517,000 Total civilian + military casualties (Allies + Axis) = 55,014,000 Related Posts Civilian Casualties of World War Two Allies: Great Britain + Commonwealth 60,000 France 360,000 United States Minimal USSR 7,700,000 Belgium 90,000 Holland 190,000 Norway Minimal Poland 5,300,000 Greece 80,000 Yugoslavia 1,300,000…
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New Page 1

The electoral statements of both candidates for the November 2000 election Bush Gore Tax : top 1% of earners would benefit from nearly half of his projected $1.37 trillion tax cuts. Tax : tax cuts worth $575 billion with better credits for couples and carers Social Security : voluntary retirement plan would invest 1.
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Albert Speer

Albert Speer became Adolf Hitler's chief architect for the Third Reich after the Nazi's gained power in January 1933. Speer held this position until the collapse of Nazi Germany. But during World War Two, Speer gained another far more important position - Minister of Armaments - and it was Speer's job to keep the Nazi war machine going against almost incredible odds, especially the constant destruction caused by the Allied bombing of Nazi Germany's main industrial zones.
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Leni Riefenstahl

Leni Riefenstahl found fame in Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany. Leni Riefenstahl became Nazi Germany's most famous film maker. In a state where women played a secondary role to men, Riefenstahl was given a free hand by Hitler to produce propaganda films for the Nazi regime. Leni Riefenstahl on the set of “Olympia” Leni Riefenstahl was born in August 1902.
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Opposition in Nazi Germany

Opposition to Nazi rule within Germany did exist from 1933 to 1945. That opposition took place at civilian, church and military levels. None of this opposition to the Nazis was successful and it is difficult to know the true extent of it. However, the consequences for those caught opposing Hitler were dire.
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Strength Through Joy

Strength Through Joy (Kraft durch Freude) was set up in Nazi Germany so that all aspects of a worker's non-working time were looked after. Strength Through Joy supervised after-work activities, holidays and leisure time. Strength Through Joy served two main purposes. The first was to ensure that no one had too much time on their hands to get involved in untoward activities against the state.
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Organisation

Effective party organisation is vital for success in America's political structure. For the purposes of this work, parties refers only to the Democrat and Republican Parties. Other political parties do exist in America politics but their national political clout is essentially non-existant. The parties are decentralised within America but the depth and pattern of organisation varies from state to state.
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Kreisau Circle

The Kreisau Circle was the name given to a group of men who opposed Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party. The Kreisau Circle got its name from the fact that the men in it frequently met at an estate in Kreisau that was owned by one of the men in it - Helmuth James Graf von Moltke. While the Nazi Party tried to give the appearance that it was highly popular party and regime from 1933, this was not the case as the last ever 'democratic' election in March 1933 illustrated.
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Pressure Groups and Government Bureaucracy

Pressure groups have had to target government bureaucracy in America. Many day-to-day decisions are made by bureaucrats, by Departments of State and regulatory commissions. Pressure groups, therefore, are concerned that their views are represented at this level. Bureaucrats can also make use of the knowledge pressure groups might have on an issue that they represent especially if one government agency is in dispute with another.
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Kristallnacht

Kristallnacht - the Night of the Broken Glass - was the Nazi government's response to the murder, on November 7 th 1938, in Paris of Ernst von Rath, a diplomat in the German embassy in the city. Von Rath was murdered by Herschel Grynszpan, a young Jew and the Nazis used this as the excuse they needed in Nazi Germany to unleash a night of violence against the whole of the Jewish community within Germany.
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Pressure Groups in America

Introduction Pressure groups play an important role in American politics. In America, as with other democracies, other institutions exist, apart from the political parties, to organise and transmit to government and politicians the views of different sections of society. Pressure groups allow this to happen.
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