History Podcasts

George Howell

George Howell

George Howell, the eldest of eight children, was born in Wrington, Somerset, on 5th October 1833. His father owned a small general builders but found it difficult to find enough work to support his family. At the age of twelve Howell left his Church of England school in Bristol and started work with his father. After a period as a mortar-boy he became a bricklayer. He worked a twelve hour day but used his Sundays for reading. Early favourites included Foxe's Book of Martyrs and Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress.

Howell disliked the heavy work of the building trade and found employment as an apprentice shoemaker. Several of the men held radical political views who were active Chartists. They introduced him to the newspapers such as the Northern Star and the Red Republican and in 1848 Howell joined the Chartist movement.

Several of the shoemakers were also Methodists and Howell was persuaded to attend meetings at the Wrington Chapel. Howell was converted and became a lay preacher. He also became an active member of the local Temperance Society.

In 1854 George Howell moved to London. Unable to find work as a shoemaker, he returned to his former trade of bricklaying. Howell attended a large number of political meetings where he met Karl Marx, George Holyoake, Charles Bradlaugh and Frederic Harrison.

Howell joined the Operative Bricklayers' Society and in 1859 became involved in an industrial dispute over demands for a nine-hour day. Howell joined the strike committee and soon emerged along with Robert Applegarth and George Potter as one of the main leaders of the union. As a result of his union activities he was blacklisted and for the next five years found it impossible to work as a bricklayer.

In 1861 he was elected to the executive of the London Trades Council and soon afterwards became its secretary. A strong supporter of universal suffrage, in 1865 Howell became full-time Secretary of the Reform League. Howell organised massive demonstrations in London in 1866 and 1867 and played an important role in persuading Benjamin Disraeli and his Conservative government to pass the 1867 Reform Act.

Disappointed by the scale of this reform, Howell continued to campaign for universal suffrage. He retained his involvement in the trade union movement and in 1871 was appointed as Secretary of the newly established Trade Union Congress. In the 1870s he also contributed regularly to The Bee-Hive and published several books on trade unionism including A Handy Book of the Labour Laws (1876), Conflicts of Capital and Labour (1878), Trade Unionism New and Old (1891) and Labour Legislation, Labour Movements and Labour Leaders (1902).

Howell tried several times to be elected to the House of Commons. He failed in the the general elections of 1868, 1874 and 1881 but was finally won as the Lib-Lab candidate in Bethnal Green in 1885. One of Howell's main achievements in Parliament was helping the passing of the Merchant Shipping Bill that improved the working conditions of merchant seamen. Howell successfully defending his Bethnal Green seat in 1886 and 1892 but was defeated by the Conservative candidate in the 1895 General Election.

In poor health, Howell retired from public life. His friend, Robert Applegarth and the Trade Union Congress raised a £1650 testimonial to buy him an annuity.

George Howell on 16th September, 1910.


John Howland

BIRTH: About 1599, son of Henry and Margaret Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire.
MARRIAGE: Elizabeth Tilley, daughter of John and Joan (Hurst) Tilley, about 1624, at Plymouth.
CHILDREN: Desire, John, Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joseph, Jabez, Ruth, and Isaac.
DEATH: 23 or 24 February 1672/3 at Rocky Nook, Plymouth.
yDNA HAPLOGROUP: R-M269

John Howland was born about 1599, probably in Fenstanton, Huntington. He came on the Mayflower in 1620 as a manservant of Governor John Carver. During the Mayflower's voyage, Howland fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea--but luckily for his millions of descendants living today (including Presidents George Bush and George W. Bush, and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt) he managed to grab hold of the topsail halyards, giving the crew enough time to rescue him with a boat-hook.

"Howland Overboard," a painting by maritime artist Mike Haywood. Giclee canvas prints are available from the MayflowerHistory.com Store.

It has been traditionally reported that John Howland was born about 1592, based on his reported age at death in the Plymouth Church Records. However, ages at death were often overstated, and that is clearly the case here. John Howland came as a servant for John Carver, which means he was under 25 years old at the time (i.e. he was born after 1595). William Bradford, in the falling-overboard incident, refers to Howland as a "lusty young man," a term that would not likely have applied to a 28-year old given that Bradford himself was only 30. Bradford did call 21-year old John Alden a "young man" though. Howland's wife Elizabeth was born in 1607: a 32-year old marrying a 17-year old is a relatively unlikely circumstance. Howland's last child was born in 1649: a 57-year old Howland would be an unlikely father. All these taken together demonstrate that Howland's age was likely overstated by at least 5 years. Since he signed the "Mayflower Compact", we can assume he was probably at least 18 to 21 years old in 1620.

John Howland had several brothers who also came to New England, namely Henry Howland (an ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford) and Arthur Howland (an ancestor to Winston Churchill).

The Jabez Howland house in Plymouth was built about 1667. John and Elizabeth Howland lived with their son Jabez in this house during the winters, and Elizabeth also lived their after the death of her husband in 1672.

The Howland family burial plot on Burial Hill in Plymouth.

Stone memorial marking the spot of John and Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland's homesite in Rocky Nook, north of Plymouth. The Pilgrim John Howland society owns the land and archaeologists have worked the site each summer for a number of years.


Mr. George Howell's History of the International Working-Men's Association

Karl Marx, Ph.D. (University of Jena, 1841) was a social scientist who was a key contributor to the development of Communist theory.

Marx was born in Trier, a city then in the Kingdom of Prussia&aposs Province of the Lower Rhine. His father, born Jewish, converted to Protestantism shortly before Karl&aposs birth in response to a prohibition newly introduced into the Rhineland by the Prussian Kingdom on Jew Karl Marx, Ph.D. (University of Jena, 1841) was a social scientist who was a key contributor to the development of Communist theory.

Marx was born in Trier, a city then in the Kingdom of Prussia's Province of the Lower Rhine. His father, born Jewish, converted to Protestantism shortly before Karl's birth in response to a prohibition newly introduced into the Rhineland by the Prussian Kingdom on Jews practicing law. Educated at the Universities of Bonn, Jena, and Berlin, Marx founded the Socialist newspaper Vorwärts! in 1844 in Paris. After being expelled from France at the urging of the Prussian government, which "banished" Marx in absentia, Marx studied economics in Brussels. He and Engels founded the Communist League in 1847 and published the Communist Manifesto. After the failed revolution of 1848 in Germany, in which Marx participated, he eventually wound up in London. Marx worked as foreign correspondent for several U.S. publications. His Das Kapital came out in three volumes (1867, 1885 and 1894). Marx organized the International and helped found the Social Democratic Party of Germany. Although Marx was not religious, Bertrand Russell later remarked, "His belief that there is a cosmic force called Dialectical Materialism which governs human history independently of human volitions, is mere mythology" (Portraits from Memory, 1956). Marx once quipped, "All I know is that I am not a Marxist" (according to Engels in a letter to C. Schmidt see Who's Who in Hell by Warren Allen Smith). D. 1883.

Marx began co-operating with Bruno Bauer on editing Hegel's Philosophy of Religion in 1840. Marx was also engaged in writing his doctoral thesis, The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophy of Nature, which he completed in 1841. It was described as "a daring and original piece of work in which Marx set out to show that theology must yield to the superior wisdom of philosophy": the essay was controversial, particularly among the conservative professors at the University of Berlin. Marx decided, instead, to submit his thesis to the more liberal University of Jena, whose faculty awarded him his PhD in April 1841. As Marx and Bauer were both atheists, in March 1841 they began plans for a journal entitled Archiv des Atheismus (Atheistic Archives), but it never came to fruition.

Marx has been described as one of the most influential figures in human history. Marx is typically cited, with Émile Durkheim and Max Weber, as one of the three principal architects of modern social science.


George Howell - History

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Frankfort Airport (LL40), Frankfort, IL

41.478, -87.845 (South of Chicago, IL)

Frankfort Airport, as depicted on the May 1965 Chicago Sectional Chart.

According to the article &ldquoAirport Owner Ahead of His Time&rdquo in the 4/25/90 Chicago Tribune (courtesy of Matt Valleau) ,

&ldquo In 1962 John Arnold felt there was a need for a small airport in the then-quiet but growing south suburbs & came across a plot of farm land in Frankfort.&rdquo

''I felt the area would really expand-which it definitely has over the years,'' he says. ''And the way this property was laid out was perfect for an airport.''

The article continued, &ldquoArnold initially purchased 23 acres in 1962 & built a single-story office building, a 10-stall hangar & a sod runway.

On 9/7/64 he held the grand opening for the Frankfort Airport.&rdquo

The earliest depiction which has been located of Frankfort Airport was on the May 1965 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Frankfort Airport as having a 2,500' unpaved runway.

Matt Valleau recalled, &ldquoFrankfort is the airport I started flying out of when I was 2 years old.&rdquo

The 1967 Chicago Local Aeronautical Chart depicted Frankfort Airport as having a 2,500' paved east/west runway.

The 1973 USGS topo map depicted Frankfort Airport as single paved east/west runway, labeled genericaly as &ldquoLanding Strip&rdquo,

with a parallel taxiway & several buildings along the north side.

The earliest photo which has been located of Frankfort Airport was a 1973 aerial view.

It depicted a single asphalt east/west runway, with a several hangars & several light single-engine aircraft along the north side.

A 1981 aerial photo depicted Frankfort Airport at perhaps the zenith of its popularity, with over 2-dozen light aircraft visible on the field.

A 1988 aerial view depicted Frankfort Airport in the same physical configuration, but with somewhat fewer aircraft visible.

The 1990 USGS topo map depicted Frankfort Airport as having a single paved east/west runway, with a parallel taxiway & several buildings along the north side.

A 1993 aerial photo depicted construction having begun for an industrial park adjacent to the south side of Frankfort Airport.

The last photo which has been located showing multiple aircraft at Frankfort Airport was a 1998 aerial view looking southeast.

A total of 3 light single-engine aircraft were still visible on the north side of the field.

A 2002 aerial photo depicted only a single aircraft at Frankfort Airport: a single-engine Cessna on the north side of the field,

which did not appear to move in subsequent aerial photos.

The April 2017 Chicago Terminal Chart depicted Frankfort Airport as a private airfield having a 4,200' paved east/west runway.

A 2018 aerial view looking southeast at Frankfort Airport showed the runway & hangars to remain intact,

but the runway appeared to be used for non-aviation storage.

A 2018 aerial view of the last remaining aircraft at Frankfort Airport: the remains of a single-engine Cessna on the north side of the field, by this point missing its left wing.

Matt Valleau reported in 2020, Frankfort (LL40) has finally been removed from the Sectional Chart.

While it&rsquos been technically closed for a while, the runway has had heavy equipment up & down it for years.&rdquo

Thanks to Matt Valleau for pointing out this airfield.

Metropolitan Airport / Ashland Avenue Airport / Chicago Heights Airport, Chicago Heights, IL

41.517, -87.659 (South of Chicago, IL)

Chicago Heights Airport, as depicted on the August 1932 Chicago Sectional Chart.

This small general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1930-32,

as it was not yet depicted on the December 1930 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest depiction which has been located of Metropolitan Airport was on the August 1932 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest photo which has been located of Metropolitan Airport was a 1938 aerial view.

It depicted a single unpaved east/west runway, with a small building on the southeast side.

There were no aircraft visible on the field.

The earliest photo which is available of Metropolitan Airport was a 5/19/38 aerial view (courtesy of Daniel McGill)

of a crowd of nearly 1,000 people who were gathered to view the first air-mail pickup.

Men & a truck promoting the 5/19/38 first air-mail pickup at Metropolitan Airport / Ashland Avenue Airport (courtesy of Daniel McGill).

A December 1940 plan of Metropolitan Airport (courtesy of Daniel McGill) depicted the airfield's unusual layout,

being squeezed into a narrow plot of land, with a golf course protruding into the middle portion.

The field was shown to have 3 unpaved runways, with the longest being a 2,800' east/west strip,

and a hangar & office on the southeast side.

A circa 1940-47 aerial view looking southwest at Metropolitan Airport (courtesy of Daniel McGill)

depicted the airfield being quite popular, with over 30 light aircraft parked near the hangars on the southeast side of the field.

being squeezed into a narrow plot of land, with a golf course protruding into the middle portion.

A circa 1940-47 photo of the Chicago Heights Airport's Midwest Aircraft Sales Corporation hangar (courtesy of Daniel McGill).

It was still labeled Metropolitan Airport on the October 1942 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It was evidently renamed Ashland Avenue Airport at some point between 1942-44,

as that was how it was labeled on the April 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It was still labeled Ashland Avenue Airport on the June 1947 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It was evidently renamed Chicago Heights Airport at some point in 1947, as that is how it was labeled on the December 1947 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Chicago Heights Airport as having a 2,900' unpaved runway.

Chicago Heights Airport was closed in 1947 when the operators lost their lease.

Chicago Heights Airport was no longer depicted on the July 1948 Chicago Sectional Chart.

A 1952 aerial view showed no trace remaining of Chicago Heights Airport, with residential streets having been constructed over the southeast portion,

and the hangar having been removed.

A 2018 aerial view showed no trace remaining of Chicago Heights Airport, with the property covered by houses.

The site of Chicago Heights Airport is located west of the intersection of Ashland Avenue & 8 th Street.

Thanks to Daniel McGill for pointing out this airfield.

Rubinkam Airport, Markham, IL

41.589, -87.688 (South of Chicago, IL)

A 2/41 proposal for turning the small (216 acre) Rubinkam Airport into a "large-volume" (1,600 acre) Chicago Airport.

This small general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1940-41,

as it was not yet depicted on the February 1940 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest depiction which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was a never-realized 2/41 proposal for turning the small (216 acre) airport

into a "large-volume" (1,600 acre) Chicago Airport.

The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was on the June 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest photo which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was a 3/9/52 USGS aerial view.

It depicted Rubinkam as having a very short east/west paved runway (or taxiway), and a longer grass northeast/southwest runway.

Over a dozen light single-engine aircraft & several small hangars were on the southeast side.

The earliest topo map depiction which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was on the 1953 USGS topo map.

It depicted Rubinkam as having a very short east/west paved runway (or taxiway), and several small hangars on the south side.

The last photo which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was a 9/3/59 USGS aerial view.

It depicted Rubinkam as having a very short east/west paved runway (or taxiway), and a longer grass northeast/southwest runway.

Over 2 dozen light single-engine aircraft & several small hangars were on the southeast side.

But note, in contrast to the 1952 photo, rows of houses had been built bordering the airport's north & east sides, foreshadowing its eventual demise.

The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Rubinkam Airport was on the January 1960 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Rubinkam as having a 3,200' unpaved runway.

Rubinkam Airport was evidently closed at some point between 1960-62,

as it was no longer depicted on the June 1962 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Bill Pagett) .

A 2016 aerial view looking north showed no trace remaining of Rubinkam Airport.

The site of Rubinkam Airport is located northwest of the intersection of 167 th Street & California Avenue.

Thanks to Toni Herndon for pointing out this airfield.

Prosperi Airport, Tinley Park, IL

41.547, -87.788 (Southwest of Chicago, IL)

Prosperi Airport, as depicted on the June 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart.

This small general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1942-44,

as it was not yet depicted on the October 1942 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest depiction which has been located of Prosperi Airport was on the June 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart,

which depicted it as a commercial/municipal airport.

The earliest photo which has been located of Prosperi Airport was a 1951 aerial view.

It depicted Prosperi as having 3 unpaved runways, with several small hangars & buildings on the northeast corner.

There were no aircraft visible on the field.

The 1953 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of Lee Corbin)

depicted Prosperi Airport as having 3 unpaved runways, with 6 small buildings on the northeast corner.

The 1953 USGS topo map depicted Prosperi Airport an an irregularly-shaped property outline, with 4 small buildings on the northeast corner.

The earliest photo which is available of Prosperi Airport was an undated aerial view from t he 1956 IL Airport Directory (from the University of IL, courtesy of Daniel McGill).

It depicted Prosperi Airport as having 2 unpaved runways, measuring 2,900' northeast/southwest & 2,500' east/west.

Two light single-engine aircraft were visible near some small buildings on the northeast corner.

According to Bruce Mabee, &ldquoProsperi Airport [was] owned & operated by Ed Prosperi, and 'Managed' by Ed's mother, the bookkeeper.

Orland Mabee operated his flights school at Prosperi after the closing of Stinson, approximately 1960-65.

A 4/1/62 USGS aerial view depicted Prosperi as having 2 unpaved runways, with 15 light single-engine aircraft parked near some small hangars & buildings on the northeast corner.

The 1963 USGS topo map showed the reason for Prosperi Airport's eventual demise &ndash

the planned Interstate 80 was superimposed right though the center of the 2 unpaved runways.

The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Prosperi Airport was on the May 1965 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Prosperi as having a 2,400' unpaved runway.

According to Bruce Mabee, &ldquoThere are historical Notes & great stories of Ed Properi [in the book 'Lost Airports of Chicago']

such as his chasing state employees with a shotgun when they came to shut down the airport for the Interstate construction

Prosperi Airport [was] closed by 1966 by the building of Interstate 80 though the airport grounds.&rdquo

Prosperi Airport was no longer depicted on the December 1966 Chicago Sectional Chart.

A 2015 aerial view showed no trace remaining of Prosperi Airport.

The site of Prosperi Airport is located north of the intersection of West 191 st Street & Prosperi Drive, appropriately enough.

Thanks to Bruce Mabee for pointing out this airfield.

Plainfield Airport, Plainfield, IL

41.627, -88.16 (Southwest of Chicago, IL)

A 4/10/62 USGS aerial photo depicted Plainfield Airport as having a single unpaved east/west runway.

This small general aviation airport was evidently established at some point between 1946-52,

as it was not yet depicted on a 1946 aerial photo.

The earliest depiction which has been located of Plainfield Airport was a 1952 USGS aerial photo,

which depicted perhaps the beginnings of the airport, with a single grass east/west runway & some farm buildings on the southwest side.

There were no aircraft visible on the field.

Plainfield Airport was not yet depicted on the January 1961 Chicago Sectional Chart.

A 1961 aerial photo showed the east/west grass runway was more distinct,

and no less than 19 light single-engine aircraft were visible parked around some small buildings on the southwest corner.

A 4/10/62 aerial photo showed the same runway configuration,

and 15 light single-engine aircraft were visible parked around some small buildings on the southwest corner.

The earliest aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Plainfield Airport was on the June 1962 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Plainfield as having a 2,400' unpaved runway.

According to Bruce Mabee, &ldquoPlainfield Airport [had] one turf runway, an office & shop.

[It offered] flight lessons by Orland Mabee, approximately 1966-70.

When Plainfield closed, Mabee moved his remaining Piper Tri-Pacer, N155D, to Clow Airport in Bolingbrook.&rdquo

The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Plainfield Airport was on the May 1968 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Plainfield as having a 2,300' unpaved runway.

Plainfield Airport was evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point in 1968,

as it was no longer depicted on the December 1968 Chicago Sectional Chart.

A 1974 aerial photo showed that Plainfield Airport's runway was still clear,

but all of the aircraft were gone, and several additional buildings had been built on the southwest corner at some point between 1962-74.

A 2003 photo by Bruce Mabee of the &ldquoPlainfield Airport office & shop, long after it closed.&rdquo

A 2015 aerial view of the site of Plainfield Airport, showing the majority of the site having been filled in with dense housing (apparently the fate of most general aviation airports!),

but the office & shop building remains standing on the southwest corner of the site.

The site of Plainfield Airport is located north of the intersection of Budler Road & West Taylor Road.

Thanks to Bruce Mabee for pointing out this airfield.

Mall Airfield / FBM Company Airfield, University Park, IL

41.44, -87.69 (South of Chicago, IL)

Mall Airfield, as depicted on the November 1950 Chicago Sectional Chart.

This private airfield was evidently established at some point between 1948-50,

as it was not yet depicted on the December 1948 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The earliest depiction which has been located of the Mall Airfield was on the November 1950 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted Mall Airfield a having a mere 1,800' unpaved runway.

The earliest photo which has been located of the Mall Airfield was a 3/29/52 USGS aerial photo.

It depicted a single unpaved northeast/southwest runway, with a few small buildings on the north side.

Paul Sedlacek reported, &ldquoWhen the American Lock Company moved from Chicago to Crete (now known as University Park),

the owner George Junkunc used the airstrip exclusively.&rdquo

The 1953 USGS topo map depicted Mall Airfield as a single unpaved northeast/southwest runway, labeled simply as &ldquoLanding Field&rdquo,

with a few small buildings on the north side.

The 1956 Chicago Local Aeronautical Chart depicted Mall as a private airfield having an 1,800' unpaved runway.

The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of the Mall Airfield was on the May 1965 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The runway had been nearly doubled in length, to 3,500'.

The Mall Airfield was evidently closed (for reasons unknown) at some point between 1965-67,

as it was no longer depicted on the 1967 Chicago Local Aeronautical Chart.

Paul Sedlacek reported, &ldquoThe owner George Junkunc added the 2 nd runway & at one time he had a Bonanza V33,

a Debonair, 2 Piper Super Cubs and a Cessna 172 (sold to his son in law) based out of there.

George was a childhood inspiration of mine who used to let me fly with him when I was a young boy.

In his later years George lived onsite.

The 1973 USGS topo map depicted Mall Airfield as having 2 perpendicular unpaved runways (still labeled simply as &ldquoLanding Field&rdquo),

along with several small buildings on the north side.

Paul Sedlacek reported, &ldquoWhen [airfield owner] George passed his heirs sold the company to Master Lock & they sold the property to FBM.&rdquo

The airfield was evidently renamed at some point between 1962-90,

as the 1990 USGS topo map depicted the &ldquoFBM Company Landing Strip&rdquo

as having 2 perpendicular unpaved runways, with several buildings on the north side.

The earliest photo which has been located of the FBM Company Airfield was a 4/4/93 USGS aerial view.

It depicted FBM as having 2 unpaved runways, with several hangars on the north side.

A circa 2005-2010 aerial view looking north depicted a collection of 4 possible hangars on the north side of the FBM Company Airfield.

Anthony Zarinnia reported in June 2011, &ldquoI overflew 2 days ago at low altitude in haze & saw the strip. X-pattern airfield,

north ramp has hangars circa pre-war, no planes or activity visible.

Grass looks overgrown but not badly. I thought I could actually put down on it no sweat.

I saw a broken ramp & some scattered & tattered buildings. no sign of a windsock or segmented circle.

The house looked abandoned & no cars to be seen. It looks abandoned for some time.&rdquo

A 9/25/13 aerial view depicted FBM as remaining completely intact, with the runways still recognizable, and the hangars still standing.

The FBM Company Airfield is located southeast of the intersection of West University Parkway & South Steger Monee Road.

Thanks to Anthony Zarinnia for pointing out this airfield.

Howell Airport (1 st location), Blue Island, IL

41.65, -87.74 (Southwest of Chicago, IL)

Howell Airport, as depicted on the October 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Richard Doehring).

This is yet another Chicago-area general aviation field which has been lost forever.

The Howell Airport in Blue Island was apparently built at some point between 1938-40,

as it was not yet depicted on a 1938 aerial photo,

nor listed among active airfields in The Airport Directory Com pany's 1938 Airports Directory (according to Chris Kennedy).

According to Karen Howell, wife of Willis (Bill) Howell, &ldquoThe airport was in his family since about 1940.&rdquo

The earliest depiction of the airfield which has been located was on the October 1944 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Richard Doehring) .

It depicted Howell as a commercial/municipal airport.

The April 1944 US Army/Navy Directory of Airfields (courtesy of Ken Mercer) described Howell as having a 2,600' unpaved runway.

The 1946 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted Howell as a commercial airport.

The earliest photo which has been located of Howell Airport was a 1951 aerial view.

It depicted the field as having 2 grass runways.

Two hangars were located on the southeast side, around which were parked 6 single-engine aircraft.

The 1953 IL Airport Directory (from the University of IL, courtesy of Daniel McGill)

depicted Howell Airport as having 4 runways, with the longest being the 2,600' east/west strip.

Four small buildings were depicted on the southeast side.

A 2/20/54 aerial view looking north at Howell Airport (courtesy of Karen Howell)

depicted the field as having 3 hangars on the north & south side of the grass airfield.

A 4/4/55 photo (courtesy of Karen Howell) of Howell Airport owner Willis Howell in front of a Piper Cub at his airport.

The 1958 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted Howell as having 3 "turf & crushed rock" runways,

with the longest being the 2,600' east/west strip.

The operator & manager was listed as W. T. Howell.

The aerial photo in the directory depicted 2 hangars north of the northwest/southeast runway,

and another hangar at the southeast corner of the field.

Curtis Kovacs recalled, "I learned to fly at Howell 1958-60 with Willie Howell.

There was corn planted in the triangle of the runways & west of the north/south runway.

Willie's school used J-3s & TriPacers. Joliet Range was still active."

According to Nick Selig, &ldquoIf you landed your airplane at this airport, you'd better pay Howell's landing fee

because he would run out in his Cadillac car & park in front of your airplane so you couldn't move it.&rdquo

Virgil Gacke moved his business, Curley's Aero Repair, to Howell Airport in 1960.

He was described as an expert on Navions.

A 1961 aerial view showed that a 3 rd hangar had been built on the northeast side at some point between 1958-61.

A 1962 aerial view showed Howell Airport in an unchanged manner.

Howell Airport was described by the 1963 AOPA Airport Directory (according to Chris Kennedy)

as having 3 gravel runways (3,400' 13/31, 2,400' 18/36, and 2,600' 9/27).

The operators were listed as Howell Flying Service & Suburban Flying Service.

The November 1971 Chicago Sectional Chart depicted Howell Airport as having a 3,100' paved runway.

At some point between 1963-71, two of the runways at Howell had been paved,

including a new 3,710' Runway 18R/36L,

as depicted on a 1971 airport directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy).

This brought Howell Airport to a total of 4 runways.

An aerial view of Howell Airport from the 1972 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of Bill Pagett).

The directory depicted the field as having 2 macadam runways (with the longest being the 3,500' northwest/southeast strip),

as well as 2 turf runways.

Dozens of light aircraft were visible parked on the northwest & southeast sides of the field.

The operators were listed as Howell Flying Service & Suburban Flying Service,

and the airport manager was listed as W.T. Howell.

The May 1973 Chicago Terminal Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Mitchell Hymowitz)

depicted Howell Airport as having a 3,100' paved runway.

Brian Wohlgemuth recalled, &ldquoI spent the better part of my early childhood tooling around Howell Airport.

My dad was part owner of Suburban Flying Service back in the mid 1970s.

Runway 9/27 was a taxiway back in the 1970s.

I don't know if it was ever rated for runway use from as far back as I can remember.&rdquo

A 1974 aerial view depicted over 40 aircraft parked on the northeast & southeast sides of the field.

Brian Wohlgemuth recalled, &ldquoWillie Howell was an interesting fellow.

When Willie died in the mid-1980s, his son sold the property to concentrate on his newer field in New Lenox, IL.&rdquo

[ Unfortunately, the Howell Airport in New Lenox didn't last very long, as it closed in 2006.]

The last aeronautical chart depiction which has been located of Howell Airport

was on the 1985-86 IL Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of John Kielhofer).

It depicted Howell as having a 3,000' paved runway.

By 1986 Howell Airport was apparently on a downslide,

as a 1986 an airport directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) showed that the runway configuration had started to shrink.

Two former runways (18L/36R & 9/27) had since been downgraded to taxiways,

and what used to be the longest runway (18R/36R) had been shortened to 2,598'.

The longest runway at that point was Runway 13/31, which had also been shortened to 3,059'.

A 1987 aerial view looking southwest at Howell Airport (courtesy of Karen Howell) during a visit by a Fuji blimp.

A 1988 aerial view depicted two-dozen light aircraft at Howell Airport.

In 1988, it was reported that Howell Airport was for sale.

A developer appeared promising to build a power center on the site

if the Village of Crestwood would purchase & deliver the land.

A 5/15/89 photo (courtesy of Karen Howell) of the festivities surrounding the last departure from Howell Airport.

The caption read, &ldquo5/15/89, Howell Airport. Bill Howell prepares to be the last plane flown from Howell Airport as thousands of 'well wishers' look on.

He flew his 1942 450-hp Stearman from Crestwood to Howell / New Lennox that day.

One Airport era ended & a new one began that day.&rdquo

Brian Wohlgemuth recalled, &ldquoThe airport 'went out with a bang' back in 1989

with a final going-away party before the airport was converted into a shopping center.

I remember taking off from the 'newer' Runway 18/36 during the final party (in my last flight in a 172 with my stepdad).

Howell was a great field and I was saddened to watch the field

that formed a big part of my childhood turned into a Best Buy & Office Depot.

The movie theaters & the Portillo's Hot Dogs have pictures in their entryway of the early airport

and the various buildings & planes that flew in over the years.&rdquo

The 1993 USGS topo map no longer depicted Howell Airport at all.

A 7/31/95 aerial photo (courtesy of Karen Howell) showed that the Rivercrest Shopping Center had covered the site of the original Howell Airport,

with not a trace remaining of the former airport.

A 4/2/13 aerial photo of the site of Howell Airport.

The site of Howell Airport is located northwest of the intersection of Cicero Avenue & Cal Sag Road.

New Lenox Airport / Howell Airport (2 nd location) (1C2), New Lenox, IL

41.48, -87.92 (Southwest of Chicago, IL)

New Lennox Airport, as depicted on the December 1969 Chicago Sectional Chart.

No airfield was yet depicted at this location on a 1961 aerial view

or on the May 1969 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of William Pagett) .

The New Lenox Airport was licensed in 1968 (according to the painted legend along the front of its hangar).

The earliest depiction which has been located of New Lenox Airport was on the December 1969 Chicago Sectional Chart.

It depicted New Lenox as a public-use airport having a 3,600' unpaved runway.

The earliest photo which has been located of New Lenox / Howell Airport was an undated aerial view from the 1972-73 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of Alex Hauzer).

The 3,000' northwest/southeast runway had evidently been paved at some point between 1969-73.

A 1974 aerial view showed that New Lenox / Howell Airport's crosswind runway had also been paved at some point between 1973-74.

Three hangars were located on the north & west sides of the field,

and 3 single-engine aircraft were visible on the north side of the field.

The airport was evidently renamed Howell New Lenox Airport at some point between 1969-83,

as that is how it was labeled on the 1983 USGS topo map.

It had evidently been taken over by the son of Willie Howell,

founder of the original Howell Airport in nearby Blue Island.

A 1988 aerial view depicted Howell Airport in the same configuration as seen in 1974.

However there was not a single airplane visible on the entire field.

A 1993 USGS aerial photo showed a total of 10 light single-engine aircraft visible parked outside on the field.

The 1998 USGS aerial photo depicted Howell Airport as having a total of 5 hangars on the northwest corner of the field,

with 2 long T-hangars having been added at some point between 1988-98.

The field did not appear very well-used, though, as only 2 aircraft were visible parked outside at the field.

In the 2002 USGS aerial photo, a total of 6 light single-engine aircraft were visible parked outside on the field.

The airport was otherwise identical in configuration to how it was depicted in the 1998 photo.

Jacob Rueth recalled, &ldquoI took about 20 hours of training there towards my private pilot's license in 2004-05,

and I left because of rumors that they were closing.&rdquo

In 2006, Howell New Lenox Airport's FAA Airport/Facility Directory data

described the field as having 2 asphalt runways: 2,877' Runway 13/31 & 2,362' Runway 5/23,

both of which were described as being &ldquoin fair condition, cracked with grass growing through.&rdquo

There were a total of 63 aircraft listed as being based on the field, including 4 multi-engine aircraft.

The field was said to conduct an average of 82 takeoffs or landings per day.

The 2006 Chicago Terminal Area Chart depicted Howell-New Lenox Airport

as having 2 paved runways, with the longest being 2,900'.

Jacob Rueth reported in 2006, &ldquoI flew in there in mid-July this year

and stopped to say hi to the people there & they were still open.&rdquo

A July 2006 aerial photo by Brian Cramer, looking north at the Howell New Lenox Airport,

taken only a few days before the field's closure.

A July 2006 aerial photo by Brian Cramer, taken on final approach for Howell's Runway 13.

A July 2006 photo by Renée Kwiat of her Beechcraft Debonair at of Howell New Lenox Airport.

According to Renée, &ldquoMy husband & I flew from Page Field, Fort Myers, FL to Howell New Lenox.

I thought documenting the hangar, which was painted with the field elevation, field name and licensure date

with a nice static shot would be a memorable keepsake of a soon-to-be-destroyed general aviation field.&rdquo

According to Brian Cramer, &ldquoHowell Airport in New Lenox closed forever on 8/1/06.

It will become mixed commercial & residential development.&rdquo

Jacob Rueth reported in 2006, &ldquoOn August 5 th I was on short final when I saw the yellow X above the numbers.

That & the place was abandoned.&rdquo

A sad 2007 aerial view showed that 3 of the hangars had been removed, with only the 2 hangars on the north side of the field still standing.

The northern half of the 2 runways still remained,

but the southern half of the property had been covered by streets for a new housing development.

A circa 2010-2013 photo looking southwest at the hangar which remains on the north side of the Howell Airport site (courtesy of Paul Glowiak).

A 2012 photo of the hangar which remained on the north side of the Howell Airport site (courtesy of Paul Glowiak).

A sad 4/2/13 aerial photo shows the stalled construction for a stillborn housing development covering the majority of the site of Howell Airport.

Amazingly, the photo shows almost no difference compared to a 2007 aerial photo.

Paul Glowiak reported in January 2014 that the above-pictured &ldquohangar is all that's left, there is construction equipment in the parking lot.&rdquo

He then reported in December 2014 that &ldquothe hanger at New Lenox/Howell Airport was demolished this past week.

There is supposed to be a mixed-use development on the property.&rdquo

Howell New Lenox Airport is located on the southeast corner of West Laraway Road & Schmul Road.

Governor's Airpark / Wings Field / Haedtler Field, Chicago Heights, IL

41.47, -87.72 (Southwest of Chicago, IL)

Governor's Airpark, as depicted on the December 1948 Chicago Sectional Chart.

Governor's Airpark was apparently built at some point between 1946-48,

as it was not yet depicted on a 1939 aerial view

or on the June 1946 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) .

The earliest depiction which has been located of Governor's Airpark was on the December 1948 Chicago Sectional Chart,

which depicted it as having a 2,700' unpaved runway.

The earliest photo which has been located of Governor's Airpark was a 1951 aerial view.

It depicted Governor's Airpark as having 2 grass runways, with a few small hangars southeast of the runway intersection.

Four light planes were parked amongst the hangars, and a 5 th plane was visible on the east end of the runway.

Sandra Thielman reported, &ldquoI&rsquom the granddaughter of Walt & Paul Thielman, the original owners & builders of Governor&rsquos Airpark

and the daughter of Leslie Thielman whom helped my grandmother run Governors.

You might find to go cart track interesting. In the aerial photo [above], you can make out the figure 8 shaped track to the right &ndash south of the driveway in front.

Many, many Saturday nights were spent there with my parents enjoying the fun of go cart racing.&rdquo

The 1958 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of George Miner) depicted Governor's Airpark as having 2 turf runways.

It listed the operator as Midwest Aircraft Sales Corporation, and listed the manager as Walter Thomas.

The 1958 IL Airport Directory (courtesy of George Miner) depicted Governor as having a 2,600' unpaved runway.

The 1960 Jeppesen Airway Manual (courtesy of George Miner).

depicted Governor's Airpark as having a 2,650' Runway 18/36 & a 2,150' Runway 9/27.

A 1960 photo (courtesy of Sandra Thielman) of Santa Claus arriving at Governor's Airpark in his red Fairchild Hiller FH-1000 helicopter.

A 1961 aerial view depicted Governor's Airpark in basically the same manner as the 1951 photo,

but the number of planes visible on the field had increased to 7.

The 1962 AOPA Airport Directory described Governor's Airpark as having 2 turf runways: 2,650' 18/36 & 2,150' 9/27.

The operator was listed as Midwest Aircraft Sales Corporation.

Sandra Thielman recalled that her mother &ldquoLeslie Thielman renamed [the airport] Wings Field after my grandfather&rsquos death.&rdquo

The 1963 Chicago Local Aeronautical Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy) depicted Wings Field as having a 2,000' paved runway.

Steve Fowler recalled, &ldquoI worked at Wing's in 1966-67 as a line boy, an experience I'll never forget.

The field had 2 full-time mechanics then, Vern & Bob, aka Vern's Aero Repair, and a full-time secretary, Harriet, who hailed from Kentucky or West Virginia.

She answered the phone, 'Good mornin', WANGS , Harriet speakin'.

We used to kid her that customers might think we were a Chinese restaurant.

Wings was fairly busy then. There were around 20 aircraft based there, 2 line boys and 2 or 3 CFI's.

The FBO owned 2 C150s which were rented often. The owners had a Rockwell Aero Commander which I once waxed entirely by hand!&rdquo

Wings Field apparently gained a paved runway at some point between 1963-68,

as the 1968 Flight Guide (courtesy of Robert Levittan) depicted it as having a 2,000' paved Runway 9/27 & a 2,200' unpaved Runway 18/36.

Timothy Faster recalled, &ldquoI soloed out of Wings in 1969 & have fond memories.&rdquo

The Aerodromes table on the 1969 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of John Voss)

described Wings Field as having 2 runways, with the longest being a 2,000' asphalt strip.

Karen Johnson-Crowther recalled, "My father, Joseph Bacik,

owned a little private air field which I remember as Wings Field.

We lived in Chicago Heights & my dad sold the airport before he retired to Florida in 1972.

I remember one year many of the small hangars were destroyed by a storm

as well as a fire which burned down the main building.

My dad had a pilot's license which he lost after his heart attack which led to retirement.

He had a few partners in the airport, one of which if I recall correctly,

committed suicide by flying his plane over Lake Michigan until he ran out of fuel."

Apparently the airfield was closed at some point between 1969-71, after being sold by Joseph Bacik,

as it was not depicted at all on the 1970 USGS topo map,

the May 1971 Chicago Sectional Chart (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

or the November 1971 Chicago Sectional Chart.

The airfield was evidently reopened by the Civil Air Patrol as 'Haedtler Field' at some point between 1971-74.

It was named in honor of renowned local pilot Marty Haedtler, who had passed away in 1971.

A 1974 aerial view depicted Haedtler Field as having an east/west paved runway & a crosswind grass runway.

Six light aircraft were visible parked on the field.

Cherie Sieger reported, "Wings Field has special meaning to me.

My father, Jim Davis, was in the Civil Air Patrol when they were redoing the airfield

and then renamed it 'Haedtler Field' in the early 1970s.

He was very involved with this airfield & he was very proud of the work they were doing there.

We flew out of that airfield many times while my dad was associated with it.

There were 2 hangars there plus a building that had the office.

My sister & I used to play in the hangar."

According to Sam Lee, his brother flew out of Govenor's Airpark with the Civil Air Patrol in early 1970s.

Haedtler Field was described in the 1976 AOPA Airport Directory (courtesy of Chris Kennedy)

as having a single 2,000' asphalt Runway 9/27.

It was said to be a private field, for "Civil Air Patrol use only."

Pat Bahn recalled, &ldquoAround 1976-1977, I was a Cadet in the Homewood/Flossmoor/South Chicago Combined CAP Squadron.

We had squadron meetings at the then Homewood Army Reserve base, which was apparently a decommissioned Nike missile site.

We did flight training at Governor&rsquos Airpark. At that time, it was nominally a CAP field, but there were still a few commercial activities still working there.

There was a fellow doing A&P work from one hangar, and there were still a few rented hangars with private aircraft there.

I recall some of the adult squadron members commenting that the CAP wouldn&rsquot pay to recap the hard runway & re-roof the building,

so at some point they expected the airfield to become unviable.

I remember they had looked at various methods to increase income, but, none of them were considered likely.&rdquo

Pat continued, &ldquoIt was a great airfield for me at that time. I learned how to fly in a Schweitzer 232, and if I hadn&rsquot moved away, I&rsquod have completed that.

The CAP had two or three 232&rsquos for basic flight training, and I think some of the adults co-owned a 126, which they used for sport operations.

We had 1 or 2 old Cessna Bird-Dogs which were left over from Vietnam surplus & were used as tow aircraft & for search & rescue.

A few of the adult members also owned small general aviation aircraft, which were available for SAR missions as needed.

We did glider operations off the big grass strip. It was wide enough that you could land a 232 sideways in a pinch.

I really liked the airfield because I could take the then-Illinois Central Gulf Commuter rail down to the station nearby & walk down the road a quarter-mile & take flight training.

I always had to make sure I caught the last train home on a Saturday, because I would otherwise have to hitchhike quite a ways.&rdquo

A 1982 photo by Sandra Thielman of Haedtler Field showed several small hangars & light aircraft.

Michael Rafferty recalled, &ldquoI was a cadet in Civil Air Patrol in the 1980s.

Circa 1984-86 we used to hold our weekly Squadron meetings at Haedtler Field in the hangar depicted in the 2006 aerial view.

The airport was still active, only used by Civil Air Patrol members for the most part.

I learned how to fly gliders (big old red & white 2-seat Schleicher that was about 25 years old,

towed up to 3,500' by a Vietnam vintage OV-1 Birddog) there,

and others in our squadron flew their 1 st solos there in an orange & white Cessna 152.

Runway 18/36 was a grass runway.

If you look at the 2000 photo, there is a square clump of trees in the middle about 1/3 of the way down from the top.

Just to the right of that clump of trees was the northernmost edge of Runway 18/36,

while if you go down near the bottom of the picture, where the dark green spot in the tree line ends, is the end of the runway.

It was about 3,000' long, not exactly smooth & chock full of gopher holes.

There were those who 'maintained' the airport that undertook gopher removal missions at night with a 22 long & a bright flashlight.&rdquo

The last photo which has been located showing Haedtler Field in operation was a 1988 aerial view.

A closeup from the 1988 aerial view showed that Haedtler Field did not appear very healthy,

as only 3 single-engine aircraft were visible on the field.

Haedtler Field was reportedly abandoned in 1989.

The 1990 USGS topo map labeled the field as "Haedtler Landing Strip", and only depicted Runway 9/27.

However, the 1991 USGS topo map appears to have been using older data,

as it labeled the field once again as "Wings Field", and depicted both runways 18/36 & 9/27.

A 1993 USGS aerial view showed Haedtler Field had been abandoned,

with all of the buildings except one having been removed, and the runway considerably deteriorated.

A 2002 photo by Sam Lee looking west along the extremely overgrown remains of Runway 27 at Governor's Airpark.

The painted runway number "27" could just barely be discerned among the weeds. Sam reported that the property was for sale.

According to Cherie Sieger, as of 2002 the old hangar was being reused to store farm equipment for the corn field.

Cherie Sieger reported in 2003, "My father [former Haedtler Field pilot Jim Davis] passed away last September 22nd.

My sister & I took his ashes to the airfield (which was being utilized as a corn field) on October 12th -

very nice people that own the corn field let us go to the old runway and we drove to the middle of it.

She headed one way as if to 'take off' and scattered half of his ashes on the runway,'

I then proceeded to 'land' taking his remaining ashes in the other direction

(can you imagine two 40+ year olds running up & down the airstrip?).

We knew the moment we had to decide what to do with his ashes that this was the most fitting send off for him.

My step-mother (who was also involved with the field at the same time as my dad)

was very moved that we chose 'Haedtler Field' as the place to leave my dad for eternity."

A circa 2006 aerial view looking west at the former hangar which remains south of the Haedtler Field runway.

A 2007 aerial view showed the sole hangar still remained on the site, which was otherwise still clear & not yet redeveloped.

A 9/25/13 aerial photo showed the remains of Haedtler Field's paved east/west runway were still barely recognizable.

There was no sign of the former grass Runway 18/36.

A single former hangar sat to the south of the Runway 27 approach end.

The site of Haedtler Field is located southeast of the intersection of South Cicero Avenue & Route C12.

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Welcome! Access to featured items is available at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building in Jackson unless otherwise specified. Research requests posted in the comments section are not routed to the library. Please contact the Reference Desk with your request at 601-576-6876 or [email protected]

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Howell’s Wind and Water Mill – Parramatta

In 1828 George Howell and his son ‘George Jnr.’ began work on what was to become one of the most distinctive landmarks for visitors coming to Parramatta by river. Howell was a 50 year old ex-convict who had settled down on 80 acres of land at Yarramundi, Richmond, but saw the need for a large mill to grind the growing number of crops being produced in the area. While there were a number of wind, water and steam mills dotted across the Sydney landscape Parramatta was still without a proper mill close to town and much of the grinding was still being done by small hand mills. Howell’s new mill was on a scale larger than any previously built in the area being 100 feet tall and consisting of six separate floors.

‘Howell’s Mill’ was situated on the banks of the river on the southern side of the Gaswork’s Bridge and the site was chosen to ensure there was a continuous flow of water for the grinding as further up the river flow could be reduced to a trickle depending on the time of the year. To accomplish this Howell also needed to construct a dam across the river to build up the reservoir of water. The construction was not without problems, firstly there was the £3000 price tag, but the biggest challenge for the Howells was their very public battle with John Raine who lived on a property on the other side of the river.

This property was part of a large plot of land owned by the Reverend Samuel Marsden. Locally known as ‘Newlands’ or ‘Rangihou’ it was at this time was leased by Raine, who had built Parramatta’s first steam mill and managed the ‘Darling Mill’ in North Parramatta. Concerned that the dam had become a thoroughfare for trespassers Raine took it upon himself to dig up the dam where it connected with his side of the riverbank. This resulted in a series of clashes between Raine’s men who were bent on removing the dam and Howell’s friends who were maintaining it. The ensuing battles were covered in detail by the local newspapers and garnered the Howells the support of their next door neighbour, John Macarthur, who not only actively supported the construction of the dam but ruled as magistrate when the case ended up in the local court.

By April 1828 the dispute had turned ugly with supporters and employees from both sides engaged in a ‘riot’ which led to John Raine being put on trial for the assault of Robert Parnel. He was later found not guilty.

The mill once completed proved to be both a landmark and major asset when it came to grinding the local grains. Clearly the mill was a good business for Howell but ten years later two fateful incidents would mar its success. The first occurred in 1837 when John Richard Barrett (architect and builder), a cousin of the Howell’s, was killed in a fatal accident at the mill. George decided to move out of the mill which he was using as his residence and move to another mill he owned near the Female Factory. As fate would have it, in March 1838, soon after the first incident George Jnr. was killed when a large plank of wood being used in the renovations fell on him and one year later George Snr died. The mill passed on to one of his sons, Thomas, but George Jnr.’s wife Elizabeth continued to manage the mill very successfully after his death. After Elizabeth died in 1866 the mill gradually fell into disrepair and was abandoned in 1868.

George Senior died in 1839 but their descendants continued to live in Parramatta for many more years and are recognised as one of the pioneer families of the region.

References
Wind and Windmills in Old Parramatta, Olga Tatrai, Southwood Press, 1994.

[Howell’s Mill, Parramatta – watercolour drawing] State Library of NSW Pictures Collection. http://acmssearch.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/itemDetailPaged.cgi?itemID=25717
The Monitor, 21 June, 1828
Funeral of the late George Howell Jun., The Sydney Monitor, 7 March, 1838
According to Howells’ grandson Vincent George Howell also had a number of convicts assigned to him to help work the land. One of these went on to become the bushranger John Donohue. The same source also states that the mill was destroyed by fire. Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 6 March, 1897, p.1
This article also claims that the Mrs Payten, wife of Nat Payten a former licensee of the Woolpack Hotel, was convinced to dig up her vegetable patch at the back of the hotel to make what they claim was the first bowling green in Australia. The Howell’s of Howell’s Mill, The Cumberland and Fruitgrowers Advocate, 26 October, 1938

by Geoff Barker, Research and Collection Services Coordinator, Parramatta Council heritage and Visitor Centre, 2014


The Rev. George Howell 1883-1888

The Rev George Howell was part of the Reformed Episcopal Church when he was at St Paul’s.

The Rev. George Howell began his clergy career as the Pastor of the Freewill Baptist Church. He had been ordained a Baptist minister in Nantucket in 1861, and went to Freewill Baptist church on trial for three months. At the expiration of that time he was called as pastor, and was recognized by a council held on the 12th of November 1861.

On the 28th of May, 1862, Mr. Howell sent in his resignation, which was accepted. He was ordained an Episcopal deacon in the Diocese of Massachusetts on June 20th 1864 and was serving a church in Pennsylvania as a deacon. About the 1st of November 1864, he moved to Christ Church, Waltham, during the absence due to illness of its Rector, the Rev. T. F. Fales.

June 15th 1866 he became Rector of Calvary Church, Danvers, Mass. In 1869 he was serving Mount Zion Church in Baltimore after serving as Assistant in Emmanuel church Baltimore, Maryland, later known as All Saints’ (P. E.) Church, which became a mission of the Church of the Ascension. In 1878 it became a mission of the Church of the Ascension, under the name of All Saints’,

In 1871 Mr Howell went to Grace Church, City Island (Westchester County). Rev. George Howell moved from Grace Church, City Island, Westchester County in 1874 and took charge of The Episcopal Church of the Atonement in Madison Avenue.

At the end 1875, the Second Reformed Episcopal Church, New York City, was organized, with about 100 members, and the Rev. George Howell, was called as Rector where he remained for eight years.

He served St Paul’s on Put-in-Bay from 1883 to 1888.

After leaving St. Paul’s, he returned to the Episcopal church.

The Rev. GEORGE HOWELL, re-opened and became minister to St. James’ Memorial, church in Eatontown., NJ. Later in 1889, the Rev. George Howell was installed as rector of Christ Church Shrewsbury, New Jersey. His stay was short, as he resigned June 29, 1890 and became an Assistant Minister in the Episcopal Church of Washington D.C.

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  • Release Date: June 21, 2016
  • ISBN: 1230001190328
  • Language: English
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George Howell, the Webbs and the political culture of early labour history

This essay focuses upon British trade unionism and examines the different interpretation of the formation and emergence of trade unions. George Howell, in his various writings, argued that trade unions had their origin on Anglo-Saxon rights and in the emergence of the medieval guilds that distinguished between skilled and unskilled workers. Alternatively, the Webbs trade unions emerge somewhere around the beginning of the eighteenth century and set up this new orthodoxy of the late nineteenth century and the early twentieth century trade unionism. The Webbs shaped an historiography and explanation which Malcolm Chase, amongst others, now challenge on the basis of recent research which has revealed the legacy of the guilds.

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Howell, George, 1833-1910

Born, 1833, Wrington education was both sporadic and rudimentary, ending before he was twelve at the age of eight he began working as a ploughboy, later moving to assist his father as a mortar boy and, in 1847, he became apprenticed to a Wrington shoemaker largely self-taught, he was to become a voracious reader, notably of religious tracts and radical periodicals enrolled in a local Chartist group, 1848, and underwent conversion to Wesleyan Methodism and taught at Sunday school. At the end of his apprenticeship in 1851, Howell moved first to Weston-super-Mare and then to Bristol, finding employment as a shoemaker and becoming involved in a Methodist improvement society and the local YMCA returned to the building trade, due to the move of his parents back to Bristol, 1853 moved to London, 1855, and rose to the position of deputy foreman and began to become involved in politics spurred by acquaintance with former Chartists and political exiles, including Mazzini, Kossuth, and Marx. Following the nine-hours dispute in the building trades (1859-1862), Howell joined the London order of the Operative Bricklayers' Society where he came into contact with the other London trade unionists including William Allan, Robert Applegarth, Edwin Coulson, George Odger, and George Potter through his involvement with the bricklayers' strike committee, Howell played a major part in the reorganization of the union on amalgamated principles and launched the Operative Bricklayers' Society Trade Circular in 1861 following leadership disputes with Edwin Coulson, ending with his resignation from the London order, and blacklisting by London builders, Howell moved to Surrey, and worked as a foreman with a former employer, a position he retained until he abandoned bricklaying for radical politics in 1865 elected to the executive of the London Trades Council, 1861, becoming secretary and serving in that position until July 1862 when ill health and Coulson's enmity forced him to resign whilst serving as secretary, he came into regular contact with the General Neapolitan Society of Working Men, affirming the solidarity of the London Trades Council with Italian nationalists became a member of the National League for the Independence of Poland in 1863, the Garibaldi Reception Committee in 1864, and the International Working Men's Association from 1864 to 1869 between 1865 and 1869, served as secretary of the Reform League, the first national organization to mobilize urban artisans for franchise reform since the Chartist campaign. During the 1868 general election he administered a special fund to mobilize new working-class voters on behalf of Liberal candidates in marginal constituencies. In 1869 he launched an abortive Liberal Registration and Election Agency with funds provided mainly by Samuel Morley and James Stansfeld and he was closely involved with the futile effort of the Labour Representation League to devise an arrangement whereby Liberals would endorse working-class candidates in selected boroughs in return for league support for official Liberals elsewhere between 1868 and 1874 Walter Morrison hired him as paid secretary of the Representative Reform Association, which advocated proportional representation he was also paid secretary of the Plimsoll and Seamen's Fund Committee from 1873 to 1875 and financial agent for the Land Tenure Reform Association. In addition he chaired the Working Men's Committee for Promoting the Separation of Church and State and served on the councils of both the National Education League and the Liberation Society. Between 1870 and 1871 Howell launched the Adelphi Permanent Building Society to provide money to enable workers to purchase homes attended the Birmingham trades union congress as unofficial representative of the Conference of Amalgamated Trades, 1869, and emerged as secretary of the parliamentary committee of the TUC, 1871, using his office to promote the repeal of the Master and Servant Act and the Criminal Law Amendment Act of 1871. After retiring from the TUC, Howell never again attained his former eminence in radical and trade union politics served successively as secretary of London school board election committees and as parliamentary agent of the Women's Suffrage Committee but failed to obtain an appointment as a school or factory inspector. Unable to secure regular employment, he turned increasingly to writing as a source of income, contributing to the labour journal the Bee-Hive in the 1870s and publishing A Handy Book of the Labour Laws, a guide to recent legislation in 1876. He also published an interpretive study of trade unionism, The Conflicts of Capital and Labour (1878). During this time, Howell also served as London business agent for a Manchester coal merchant and, in 1881, briefly edited the labour weekly Common Good. Howell made several attempts to enter parliament, contesting Aylesbury in 1868 and 1874 and Norwich in 1871, before becoming MP for North-East Bethnal Green in 1885 which he held until 1895. While in Parliament Howell continued to rely on journalism for his livelihood, although he was also briefly employed by the National Home Reading Union. He published Trade Unionism New and Old in 1891 and, after 1895, he withdrew entirely from political life, devoting himself to writing. His biography of Ernest Jones, serialized in the Newcastle Weekly Chronicle in 1898, never appeared in book form. His final work, Labour Legislation, Labour Movements and Labour Leaders, was published in 1902 died 1910.

From the guide to the Howell Ephemera Collection, 1835-1945, (Bishopsgate Institute)

Initial ingest from EAC-CPF

Additional Details - 2016-08-14 09:08:41 am

This Constellation was ingested from EAC-CPF and contains the following additional historical control information.

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Watch the video: Manual Coffee Brewing Pour Over Coffee with George Howell (December 2021).