History Podcasts

12 August 1943

12 August 1943

12 August 1943

War in the Air

Eighth Air Force Heavy Bomber Mission No. 81: 330 aircraft sent to attack targets in the Ruhr, including Bochum, Bonn, Gelsenkirchen and Recklinghausen. 25 aircraft lost.

Italy

A large number of German troops are evacuated from Sicily

Eastern Front

Soviet troops capture Chuguyev

Pacific

US Troops land on Baanga Island, close to Munda, New Georgia, but are repulsed by unexpectedly heavy Japanese resistance.

Advance party lands on Vella Lavella the on night of 12-13 August to prepare for the main invasion of 15 August.



8th Air Force raid on 12 August 1943?

Post by Romani » 17 Mar 2009, 19:59

I am reading "A wing and a prayer" by Harry Crosby, a navigator with 100th Bomb Group.

On 12th August 1943, this group among others flew a mission against a target in Germany, Crosby doesn't remember what it was, since it was covered by clouds, they came over Bonn but he as lead navigator aborted the attack because he couldn't get himself to bomb the place "where Beethoven had gone to school", instead they went and bombed some rail yards in the Ruhr.

What was the mission's intended target?

What target was actually bombed?

Re: 8th Air Force raid on 12 August 1943?

Post by Takao » 17 Mar 2009, 22:53

The primary target was a synthetic oil plant located in Wesseling, Germany, some 5-10 miles North-Northwest of Bonn.
Members of the 349th Bomb Squadron report dropping on Bonn. However, Mr. Crosby was part of the 419th Bomb Squadron.

A good place as any to start you research: http://www.100thbg.com/

Re: 8th Air Force raid on 12 August 1943?

Post by JamesL » 25 Mar 2009, 18:15


August 12, 1943 - STRATEGIC OPERATIONS (Eighth Air Force): VIII Bomber Command Mission 81:
The Ruhr is targetted with the bombers concentrating on manufacturing
installations and synthetic oil.
1. 183 B-17's are dispatched to synthetic oil installations at Bochum,
Gelsenkirchen and Recklinghausen some B-17's become separated on the bomb
run and bomb various targets of opportunity 133 B-17's hit the targets at
0845-0925 hours they claim 25-5-11 Luftwaffe aircraft 23 B-17's are lost,
2 are damaged beyond repair and 103 are damaged casualties are 5 KIA, 49
WIA and 232 MIA.
2. 147 B-17's are dispatched to manufacturing installations at Bonn 110
hit the target at 0850-0858 hours they claim 4-2-2 Luftwaffe aircraft 2
B-17's are lost, 1 is damaged beyond repair and 69 are damaged casualties
are 1 KIA, 7 WIA and 21 MIA.
VIII Air Support Command Missions 17 and 18: 71 B-26's are dispatched to
the Poix/Nord Airfield in France 34 hit the target at 1052 hours 13
aircraft are damaged.


Gratz News – August 12, 1943

The following news briefs were published in the “Gratz News” section of a local newspaper, 12 August 1943:

Mrs. S. O. Smeltz and Miss Hannah Clarkevisited relatives in Philadelphia recently.

Mr. Lloyd Bellisand son Robert Bellisof Millersburgwere visitors in this community on Thursday.

Mrs. C. J. Umholtz of Elizabethvillevisited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Buffington on Wednesday.

Mr. Louis Knohrof the Army, stationed at Fort Dix, New Jersey, spent the week end with their mother, Mrs. Jennie Knohrand family.

Mr. and Mrs. William Partridgeand children of Bethlehem and Raymond Deckertof Harrisburg were visitors at the home of Mrs. Della Laudenslageron Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. HowardBarr and family of Valley Viewwere visitors at the home of Ida Witmerand Sula Witmer.

Harold Steelyof Holyoke, Massachusetts is visiting his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Homer Umholtz.

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Reitzand son Richard spent the week end with Mr. Reitz’s sister in Baltimore, Maryland.

Rev. and Mrs. Henry Reedof Lititz were visitors at the home of Ida Witmerand Sula Witmeron Wednesday.

Visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Reigleon Saturday were: Mr. and Mrs. Francis Klingerand son John Klinger, Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Klingerand Mrs. Amelia Klingerof Lykensand Rev. A. L. Zechman of Elizabethville.

Miss Alma Stielyof Klingerstownand Miss Mary Klingerof Lykensare visiting their grandfather, Mr. Clarence Williard.

Kenneth Kissingerspent the week end at the home of his sister, Mrs. Francis Snyderat Elizabethville.

Mr. and Mrs. John Brosiusand children were visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Marcus Brosiusat Hebe, last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Portzline and family of Harrisburg were visitors in town during the week end.

Jane Wiseof Harrisburg visited her grandfather, Mr. Charles M. Wise on Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Lucasof Allentown spent the week end with her sister, Mrs. Laura Hassingerand family.

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Matterand children of Lykenswere visitors at the home of Mr. John E. Miller on Wednesday.

Mrs. Russell Hoffmanvisited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Lupoldat Loyaltonon Thursday.

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Schminkyand daughters Margaret Schminky, Anne Schminkyand Nancy Schminky, of Pittsburgh, visited relatives and friends in town last week.

Mrs. R. L. McNally and granddaughter Mary of Sunbury were guests of Mrs. Beulah Shade, last week.

Mrs. Paul Umholtzand son Richard Umholtzof Highspire were week end guests at the home of Miss Hannah Umholtz.

Mr. and Mrs, Edward Reigle, of Bainbridge, Pennsylvania, were visitors at the home of Mrs. Elsie Bellison Friday.

Miss Eva Shade of Valley Viewvisited her aunt, Cora Snyder, last week.

Mrs. Kate Himmelsberger of Tremontand Mrs. Samuel Starrof Valley Viewwere visitors at the homes of Mrs. Ira Rothermel and family and Mrs. Jennie Knohr and family.

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Snyderof Lykenswere visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Miller on Sunday.

Gloria Millerof Halifaxis visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Miller.

Corrections and additional information should be added as comments to this post.


12 August 1943 - History

Saline Rentschler Farm Gardening

Irish Hills Randy's BBQ Food

Three Oaks Journeyman Distillery

Fort St. Joseph in Niles, MI

US 12 Garage Sale 2nd weekend in August

Apple Cider Century Bike Ride!

Gladiola Farm in Bronson, MI

Coldwater Little River Railroad

St. Annes Church in Corktown

Antique Shop in Edwardsburg

Irish Hills Hidden Lake Gardens

Coldwater Capri Drive Inn

Warren Woods in Three Oaks

Niles Four Flags Historic Hotel

Buchanan Michigan Pears Mill

White Pigeon Tasty Nut Shop

The next US 12 Heritage Trail Garage Sale will take place onFriday August 13th to Sunday August 15th 2021!

If you love shopping and searching for hidden treasures, this journey is for you! The US 12 Heritage Trail Garage Sale is aptly called, &ldquoMichigan&rsquos Longest Garage Sale!&rdquo

Every year individuals clean out their attics and stake out their front yards along the US-12 corridor stretching over 180 miles from New Buffalo to Detroit. You will find everything from antiques, collectibles, furniture, dishware, fresh garden produce, homemade jams and jellies, live entertainment and much more. Perhaps even more interesting than the &ldquotreasures&rdquo are the people you will meet along the way. The sales can be found along the highway at homes, farms, businesses, parking lots and fields. Some areas will have large numbers of vendors while others may be scattered. As you drive the country roads on your quest, you will be privy to incredible stories related to the individuals and the items they sell and see a plethora of items that only your grandmother could love. Most importantly most come to see the unusual and socialize. It is Americana at its best.

Please remember to drive safely and to slow down while traveling US-12 and pay special attention when parking and crossing the highway during the sale.


Geneva Convention Protocols

In 1977, Protocols I and II were added to the Conventions of 1949. Protocol I increased protections for civilians, military workers and journalists during international armed conflicts. It also banned the use of “weapons that cause superfluous injury or unnecessary suffering,” or cause “widespread, long-term and severe damage to the natural environment.”

According to the Red Cross, Protocol II was established because most victims of armed conflicts since the 1949 Convention were victims of vicious civil wars. The Protocol stated all people not taking up arms be treated humanely and there should never be an order by anyone in command for “no survivors.”

In addition, children should be well cared for and educated, and the following is prohibited:

  • taking hostages
  • terrorism
  • pillage
  • slavery
  • group punishment
  • humiliating or degrading treatment

In 2005, a Protocol was created to recognize the symbol of the red crystal—in addition to the red cross, the red crescent and the red shield of David𠅊s universal emblems of identification and protection in armed conflicts.

Over 190 states follow the Geneva Conventions because of the belief that some battlefield behaviors are so heinous and damaging, they harm the entire international community. The rules help draw a line𠅊s much as is possible within the context of wars and armed conflicts�tween the humane treatment of armed forces, medical staff and civilians and unrestrained brutality against them.


The Fairfield Recorder (Fairfield, Tex.), Vol. 67, No. 46, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 12, 1943

Weekly newspaper from Fairfield, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

Physical Description

eight pages : ill. page 22 x 15 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

Creation Information

Context

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: Freestone County Area Newspaper Collection and was provided by the Fairfield Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this issue can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this newspaper or its content.

Editor

Publisher

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this newspaper as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this issue useful in their work.

Provided By

Fairfield Library

The Fairfield Library first opened its doors August 2, 1954, in a small brick house on the Courthouse square with just 224 books. By 1977, the growing library gained accreditation in the Texas Library System and subsequently became a place where families could spend time together reading and enjoying the abundant resources.


The Hereford Brand (Hereford, Tex.), Vol. 43, No. 32, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 12, 1943

Weekly newspaper from Hereford, Texas that includes local, state and national news along with advertising.

Physical Description

ten pages : b&w page 24 x 16 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

Creation Information

Context

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: The Brand (Hereford, TX) and was provided by the Deaf Smith County Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 71 times. More information about this issue can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this newspaper or its content.

Editor

Publisher

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this newspaper as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this issue useful in their work.

Provided By

Deaf Smith County Library

Located in the western Texas Panhandle, the Library serves Hereford and the surrounding area. From its start as a small room in the Hereford Bank in 1910 to its current role as a technological and education center, the Library has continued to uphold its mission to provide access and promote learning in the community.


United States History Content Standards

ERA STANDARDS
Era 1
Three Worlds Meet (Beginnings to 1620)
Standard 1: Comparative characteristics of societies in the Americas, Western Europe, and Western Africa that increasingly interacted after 1450

Standard 2: How political, religious, and social institutions emerged in the English colonies

Standard 2: The impact of the American Revolution on politics, economy, and society

Standard 2: How the industrial revolution, increasing immigration, the rapid expansion of slavery, and the westward movement changed the lives of Americans and led toward regional tensions

Standard 3: The extension, restriction, and reorganization of political democracy after 1800

Standard 2: The course and character of the Civil War and its effects on the American people

Standard 2: Massive immigration after 1870 and how new social patterns, conflicts, and ideas of national unity developed amid growing cultural diversity

Standard 3: The rise of the American labor movement and how political issues reflected social and economic changes

Standard 2: The changing role of the United States in world affairs through World War I

Standard 2: How the New Deal addressed the Great Depression, transformed American federalism, and initiated the welfare state

Standard 2: How the Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics


The New Ulm Enterprise (New Ulm, Tex.), Vol. 33, No. 44, Ed. 1 Thursday, August 12, 1943

Weekly newspaper from New Ulm, Texas that includes local, state, and national news along with advertising.

Physical Description

eight pages : ill. page 23 x 16 in. Digitized from 35 mm. microfilm.

Creation Information

Creator: Unknown. August 12, 1943.

Context

This newspaper is part of the collection entitled: New Ulm Enterprise and was provided by the Nesbitt Memorial Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this issue can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this newspaper or its content.

Creator

Publisher

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this newspaper as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this issue useful in their work.

Provided By

Nesbitt Memorial Library

The Library is the municipal library of Columbus. It was named after Lee Quinn Nesbitt, who financed the building's construction. Materials focus Colorado County history from the 1800s to the late 1900s, including early Texas settlers, Civil War letters, Reconstruction, world war veterans and other events in the county's development.