History Podcasts

Brown DD- 546 - History

Brown DD- 546 - History

Brown

George Brown entered the Navy on board the schooner Enterprise as a Seaman, at Malta, 8 July 1803. He took part in the expedition under Lieutenant Stephen Decatur, Jr., which entered the harbor of Tripoli in the ketch Intrepid 16 Februa7ry 1804 and destroyed the frigate Philadelphia. Quartermaster Brown was detached from the Navy 2 March 1805.

(DD-546: dp. 2050; 1. 37615"; b. 39'7"; dr. 17'9"; s. 35.2
k.; cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 21" TT.; cl. Fletcher)

Brown (DD-546) was launched 21 February 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro, Calif.; sponsored by Mrs. Claude 0. Kell, wife of Captain Kell; and commissioned 10 July 1943, Lieutenant Commander T. H. Copeman in command.

On 10 November 1943 Brown departed Pearl Harbor in company with TF 50 enroute to the forward area. During Brown's very active service in the Pacific she screened carriers during the Gilbert Islands invasion (21 November-6 December 1943) ; Kavieng, New Ireland, raids (25 December 1943-4 January 1944) ; Marshall Islands raids (29 January-7 February) ; Truk raid (16-1T February) ; Palau-Yap-Woleai raids (30 March-2 April) ; assault and capture of Hollandia, New Guinea (21-28 April) ; Truk raid (29 April); bombardment of Satawan (30 April) Ponape raids (1 May) ; Marcus Island raid (19-20 May) Wake Island raid (23 May) ; strikes in support of the assault on Saipan (1-26 June) ; Battle of the Philippine Sea, during which she rescued four American pilots (19-20 June) ; bombardment of Iwo Jima (4 July) ; assault on Guam and Tinian (12 July-6 August) ; Yap raids (26-28 July) ; Chichl Jima raids (4-5 August) ; raids on Palau, Mindanao, Talaud, and Morotai, supporting the capture of the southern Palaus and Ulithl (6-15 September) raids against Luzon and the Visavas (21-24 September) raids on Okinawa, Formosa, and huzon (10 19 October) Battle for Leyte Gulf (25 October) ; raids on Manila and the Visayas (5 November) ; and raids against northern and central Philippines in support of the seizing of Mindoro Island (15-16 December).

Task Force 38 was caught in a typhoon (17-18 December) and strikes against Luzon were canceled in order to search for survivors of three missing destroyers. On 21 December Brown recovered 13 survivors of Hull (DD-350) and six survivors of Monaghan (DD-354). Brown then proceeded to Ulithi and received orders to return to Seattle, Wash., for overhaul. Repairs completed on 1 March 1945, she was ready for sea. After a brief stop at Pearl Harbor, Brown headed westward to take part in the Okinawa operation (1 April-,30 June 1945), during which she was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation for her service as a radar picket ship; 3d Fleet operations against Japan (30 June-15 July) ; and the minesweeping operations southwest of Okinawa.

With the cessation of hostilities Brown served with the occupation forces in Japan until 28 October 1945. She then departed for San Diego, arriving 17 November 1945. Ordered to duty with the 19th Fleet, she went out of commission In reserve 1 August 1946 at San Diego.

Brown was recommissioned 27 October 1950. She conducted intensive shakedown operations off the west coast and then reported to Commander, Naval Forces, Par East, in March 1951. From March until September she operated with TFs 77 and 95 and participated in the siege of Wonsan Harbor on two occasions. Brown returned to California in October 19.151. Her next Western Pacifle tour was between July 1952 and January 1953 during which time she operated on the Formosan Patrol. Since that time she has made four Par Eastern tours and has operated along the west coast.

Brown received the Navy Unit Commendation, for services rendered during the Okinawa operation, in addition to 13 battle stars for her World War II service. She was awarded two battle stars for her Korean service.


USS Brown (DD-546)

USS Brown (DD-546) was a Fletcher-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for George Brown, a seaman on the crew of USS Intrepid during the raid that destroyed the captured USS Philadelphia in Tripoli harbor during the First Barbary War.

Brown was launched 21 February 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co. San Pedro, California, sponsored by Mrs. Claude O. Kell, wife of Captain Kell, and commissioned 10 July 1943, Lieutenant Commander Thomas H. Copeman in command.


Contents

Brown was launched on 21 February 1943 by Bethlehem Steel Co. San Pedro, California, sponsored by Mrs. Claude O. Kell, wife of Captain Kell. The ship was commissioned on 10 July 1943, Lieutenant Commander Thomas H. Copeman in command.

The Bethlehem Steel Corporation was a steel and shipbuilding company that began operations in 1904 and was America's second-largest steel producer and largest shipbuilder.

Ship commissioning is the act or ceremony of placing a ship in active service, and may be regarded as a particular application of the general concepts and practices of project commissioning. The term is most commonly applied to the placing of a warship in active duty with its country's military forces. The ceremonies involved are often rooted in centuries old naval tradition.

On 10 November 1943 Brown departed Pearl Harbor in company with Task Force 50 (TF 50) en route to the forward area. During Brown ' s very active service in the Pacific, she screened carriers during

Pearl Harbor is a lagoon harbor on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, west of Honolulu. It has been long visited by the Naval fleet of the United States, before it was acquired from the Hawaiian Kingdom by the U.S. with the signing of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1875. Much of the harbor and surrounding lands is now a United States Navy deep-water naval base. It is also the headquarters of the United States Pacific Fleet. The U.S. government first obtained exclusive use of the inlet and the right to maintain a repair and coaling station for ships here in 1887. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan on December 7, 1941, was the immediate cause of the United States' entry into World War II.

The Pacific Ocean theater, during World War II, was a major theater of the war between the Allies and the Empire of Japan. It was defined by the Allied powers' Pacific Ocean Area command, which included most of the Pacific Ocean and its islands, while mainland Asia was excluded, as were the Philippines, the Dutch East Indies, Borneo, Australia, most of the Territory of New Guinea and the western part of the Solomon Islands.

An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft. Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighters, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. While heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets. Tactically or even strategically, it replaced the battleship in the role of flagship of a fleet. One of its great advantages is that, by sailing in international waters, it does not interfere with any territorial sovereignty and thus obviates the need for overflight authorizations from third party countries, reduce the times and transit distances of aircraft and therefore significantly increase the time of availability on the combat zone.

  • the Gilbert Islands invasion (21 November – 6 December 1943)
  • Kavieng, New Ireland raids (25 December 1943 – 4 January 1944),
  • Marshall Islands raids (29 January – 7 February),
  • Truk raid (16 – 17 February)
  • Palau-Yap-Woleai raids (30 March – 2 April)
  • assault and capture of Hollandia, New Guinea (21 – 28 April)
  • Truk raid (29 April)
  • bombardment of Satawan (30 April)
  • Ponape raids (1 May)
  • Marcus Island raid (19 – 20 May)
  • Wake Island raid (23 May)
  • strikes in support of the assault on Saipan (1 – 26 June)
  • Battle of the Philippine Sea, during which she rescued four American pilots (19 – 20 June),
  • bombardment of Iwo Jima (4 July),
  • assaults on Guam and on Tinian (12 July – 6 August)
  • Yap raids (26 – 28 July)
  • Chichi Jima raids (4 – 5 August)
  • raids on Palau, Mindanao, Talaud, and Morotai,
  • supporting the capture of the Southern Palaus and Ulithi (6 – 15 September)
  • raids against Luzon and the Visayas (21 – 24 September)
  • raids on Okinawa, Formosa, and Luzon (10 – 19 October)
  • Battle for Leyte Gulf (26 October)
  • raids on Manila and the Visayas (6 November),
  • and raids against northern and central Philippines in support of the seizing of Mindoro Island (15 – 16 December).

The GilbertandMarshall Islands Campaign were a series of battles fought from November 1943 through February 1944, in the Pacific Theater of World War II between the United States and the Empire of Japan. They were the first steps of the drive across the central Pacific by the United States Pacific Fleet and Marine Corps. The purpose was to establish airfields and naval bases that would allow air and naval support for upcoming operations across the Central Pacific. Operations Galvanic and Kourbash were the code names for the Gilberts campaign that included the seizures of Tarawa and Makin. Operations Flintlock and Catchpole were aimed at capturing Japanese Bases at Kwajalein, Eniwetok, and Majuro in the Marshall Islands.

Kavieng is the capital of the Papua New Guinean province of New Ireland and the largest town on the island of the same name. The town is located at Balgai Bay, on the northern tip of the island. As of 2009, it had a population of 17,248.

New Ireland or Latangai, is a large island in Papua New Guinea, approximately 7,404 km 2 (2,859 sq mi) in area with ca. 120,000 people. It is the largest island of New Ireland Province, lying northeast of the island of New Britain. Both islands are part of the Bismarck Archipelago, named after Otto von Bismarck, and they are separated by Saint George's Channel. The administrative centre of the island and of New Ireland province is the town of Kavieng located at the northern end of the island. While the island was part of German New Guinea, it was named Neumecklenburg.

Task Force 88 was caught in a typhoon (17 – 18 December), and strikes against Luzon were canceled in order to search for survivors of three missing destroyers. On 21 December Brown recovered 18 survivors of the destroyer Hull and six survivors of the destroyer Monaghan. Brown then proceeded to Ulithi and received orders to return to Seattle, Washington, for overhaul. Repairs completed on 1 March 1945, she was ready for sea. After a brief stop at Pearl Harbor, Brown headed westward to take part in the Okinawa operation (1 April – 30 June 1945), during which she was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation for her service as a radar picket ship 3d Fleet operations against Japan (30 June – 15 July) and the minesweeping operations southwest of Okinawa.

A typhoon is a mature tropical cyclone that develops between 180° and 100°E in the Northern Hemisphere. This region is referred to as the Northwestern Pacific Basin, and is the most active tropical cyclone basin on Earth, accounting for almost one-third of the world's annual tropical cyclones. For organizational purposes, the northern Pacific Ocean is divided into three regions: the eastern, central, and western. The Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) for tropical cyclone forecasts is in Japan, with other tropical cyclone warning centers for the northwest Pacific in Hawaii, the Philippines and Hong Kong. While the RSMC names each system, the main name list itself is coordinated among 18 countries that have territories threatened by typhoons each year A hurricane is a storm that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean or the northeastern Pacific Ocean, a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and a tropical cyclone occurs in the South Pacific or the Indian Ocean.

The third USS Hull (DD-350) was a Farragut-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Isaac Hull.

USS Monaghan (DD-354) was the last ship built of the Farragut-class destroyer design. She was named for Ensign John R. Monaghan. Monaghan was laid down on November 21, 1933 at the Boston Navy Yard, and launched on January 9, 1935. She was sponsored by Miss Mary F. Monaghan, niece of Ensign Monaghan, and commissioned on 19 April 1935, with Commander R. R. Thompson in command. During the next few years Monaghan operated primarily in the North Atlantic, training US Navy personnel who served in World War II. Monaghan was present during the Pearl Harbor raid on December 7, 1941. She participated in the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway in 1942. Monaghan was sunk in a typhoon east of the Philippines in 1944.

With the cessation of hostilities Brown served with the occupation forces in Japan until 28 October 1945. She then departed for Naval Station San Diego, arriving 17 November 1945. She went out of commission in reserve 1 August 1946 at San Diego.

1950 – 1962

Brown was recommissioned 27 October 1950. She conducted intensive shakedown operations off the west coast and then reported to Commander, Naval Forces, Far East, in March 1951. From March until September she operated with Task Forces 77 and 95 and participated in the siege of Wonsan Harbor on two occasions. Brown returned to California in October 1951. Her next Western Pacific tour was between July 1952 and January 1953, during which time she operated on the Formosan Patrol. She made four further Far Eastern tours and operated along the West Coast.

Brown was decommissioned 9 February 1962.

Greek service

The ship was transferred to Greece on 27 September 1962. She served in the Greek Navy as Navarinon (D63).

In 1981, the ship was stricken and scrapped.


1950–1962

Brown was recommissioned 27 October 1950. She conducted intensive shakedown operations off the west coast and then reported to Commander, Naval Forces, Far East, in March 1951. From March until September she operated with TFs 77 and 95 and participated in the siege of Wonsan Harbor on two occasions. Brown returned to California in October 1951. Her next Western Pacific tour was between July 1952 and January 1953, during which time she operated on the Formosan Patrol. She made four further Far Eastern tours and operated along the West Coast.

Brown was decommissioned 9 February 1962.


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Product Description

USS Brown DD 546

Korean War Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Brown cruise book during the Korean war. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • The Story of the USS Brown.
  • Ports of Call (Pearl Harbor, Subic Bay, Korea Waters, Yokusuka Japan, Kao Hsuing, Hong Kong, Sasebo Japan and Midway Island.
  • Divisional Group Photos with Names and Rank
  • Hawaiian Holiday
  • Change of Command Ceremony

Over 160 Photos on Approximately 36 Pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this destroyer at this point in time.

Additional Bonus:

  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in Korean War era documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Brown DD- 546 - History

    Yap Island Mission Loss&mdash27 July 1944

    The following plane was lost on 27 July 1944 on a mission to Yap Island. I would greatly appreciate anyone's help to locate additional information regarding the information listed below.Submit additional information, updates, newpaper articles, pictures, and supporting documents to: [email protected]

    27 July 1944 TBM-1C Grumman Avenger VT-31 from the USS Cabot Ditched in ocean off Yap.
    27 July 1944 SB2C-1C Helldiver VB-2 from the USS Hornet Dove into the Ground due to aileron failure.
    27 July 1944 F6F-3 Hellcat VF-31 from the USS Cabot Returning from the Yap Island strike Lt. Mulcahy was forced to ditch because of flack damage to his aircraft after returning to the task force but was picked up unharmed and returned to Cabot.

    1. Lt.(jg) John B. Russell of Portsmouth, Ohio
    2. AMM2c. Warren. Niles. Bennett of Jackson, Michigan
    3. PhoMlc. Howard Medford Webster Jr. from Grayslake, IL. Photographer.

    VT-31 History for 27 July 1944: Strikes launched against Yap Island. A TBM flown by Lt. Russell was hit by flack while approaching the target. The fuel tanks were breached and the aircraft set ablaze. He succeeded in dropping his four 100lb bombs on the target and headed out over water where Russell was able to hold the crippled Avenger in the air long enough for the crew bail out just off shore. The shore batteries opened fire on the downed plane crew but were unable to lower their guns enough and they fired over them. The covering F6Fs from VF-31 proceeded to make short order of the shore batteries and flew overhead until an OS2U Kingfisher from the cruiser USS Columbia (CL-56) arrived and picked up the wounded men. Pilot Lt. (jg) Russell along with crewmen AMM2c Bennett and PhoMlc Webster, were taken to the destroyer USS Brown (DD 546) and returned to Cabot. All three men were awarded Purple Hearts. Information from: www.vf31.com

    VF-1 Action Report: Comdr. PETER's section was waiting its turn at the target wehen a TBF was shot down by A.A. and he began to direct rescue operations. The three TBF survivors were just outside the reef off the southeastern shore of the island. Read completed report at: VF-1 Action Report: Rescue operation for TBF crew

    The following data was located at: www.mcallen.lib.tx.us

    TBM #1 missing from strike on Yap, but picked up by USS Brown (DD 546) and returned Lt. (jg) J. B. RUSSELL and crewmen W. M. BENNETT, AMM2c and H. M. WEBSTER, PhoMlc.

    On 5 Sept. Russell, J.B., Lt(jg) was presented the Purple Heart award by Captain S.J. MICHAEL.

    On 15 Sept. Russell, J.B., Lt(jg) was presented the The Navy Cross award by Captain S.J. MICHAEL.

    24 July, the Group approaching Woleai Island. Lt. (jg)? R. O. ZIMMERMAN made a barrier crash landing with no personal injuries. 25 July, the Force bombed and strafed Ulithi Atoll and on the 26th, TBM #1 missing from strike on Yap, but picked up by USS Brown (DD 546) and returned Lt. (jg) J. B. RUSSELL and crewmen W. M. BENNETT, AMM2c and H. M. WEBSTER, PhoMlc.

    The following account about the July 26-27 attack on Yap is from World War II Journal of Lawrence James Kennedy, Jr at: www.its.caltech.edu

    Picture of TBM-1C Avenger Torpedo Bomber over Yap on 26 July 1944:

    The entire flight seemed so simple, so unopposed and so much like training that I was quite anxious to get in another flight if possible during the afternoon. Imagine, then my surprise to learn that one bomber from another squadron accompanying us was shot down as he pulled out and made a water landing offshore. Fortunately he was soon rescued by an OS2U which landed under fire in the water next to it. But that afternoon I was even more sobered by one of our own planes which dove into the ground where it exploded. This hit home rather hard, for he, the gunner, was one of the few men aboard whom I know. He was one of three men transferred into this squadron on July

    Avenger crew rescue by Kingfisher:

    Story about a VS-310 Kingfisher from the cruiser Columbia saving three American airmen from an Avenger on 27 July 1944 in the Yap harbour.

    It is the latter that we selected to present the OS2U Kingfisher. The people of Yaptown, Yap Island in the Carolines, basked in a pleasant, typical Pacific morning sun on the 27th of July 1944. The big harbor was peaceful only an occasional whitecap broke the monotony of its surface. Overhead were scattered, fluffy cumulus clouds, cotton-balls hanging listlessly in the rich blue sky. Then, Task Force 58 with its 125 ships of the line (sixteen carriers) struck from fifty miles away. Around mid-day Avengers and Heilcats of VT-31 and VF-31 from the carrier Cabot struck Yaptown from the inland side of the city. The Avengers, each armed with four 100 pound general purpose bombs, made their bomb runs from 15,000 feet dropping down over the target then levelling off at 500 feet as they raced out over the harbor.

    In mid-run to target a TBM of VT-31 is hit in the main fuel tank by flak. The pilot drops his bombs. The cockpit is burning. Still he holds the big ship at 500 feet until his two crewmen finally clear their aft compartment, which is also burning. Only then does the pilot leave the burning aircraft. Three are burned and down in the harbor. The enemy shore installations begin firing on them, but the shots pass overhead. The guns cannot be depressed low enough to get them, and the three are just beyond the range of smaller weapons. While VF-31 Heilcats go to work strafing the shore batteries, a call is Hashed to the anti-sub patrol for a Kingfisher.

    Within minutes a Kingfisher from the cruiser Columbia was on the scene, its pilot bringing the aircraft in low and straight for the wounded Avenger crewmen. Now the shore batteries took him on as a target. The water came alive from exploding shells, still the OS2U came on to the men. After loading the TBM's pilot into the rear seat, his two crewmen sat on the wings and held on. The OS2U pilot would now dash over the water for the pick-up submarine five miles away. On the way out the Kingfisher pilot must pass through the entire effective range of the guns on the beach- and it is this section of the action that you see in the painting.

    The end of the story is that thanks to a Kingfisher and her pilot and radioman-gunner, three more American lives were saved. After the long taxi to the submarine, the two Avenger-enlisted crew members were transferred. Then, with the Avenger pilot still snuggled down in the rear seat and its usual occupant setting astride the fuselage just behind him, the OS2U pilot took off for a rendezvous with the Columbia.

    The following passage was provided by Mike from the VF-31 web site

    I have found this passage in one of the officers memoirs (the beast was Lt Russell's nickname):

    July 26. Strike Yap. Flack not very much but what there was of it, was very accurate. After all, we are giving them plenty of practice.

    The Beast was hit again. "I had just finished my run and was turning so that Webster (PhotoMate 1/c) could get some pictures. I felt a thud and the plane was tossed up a few feet then came an explosion and I knew we were hit. I climbed and headed out to sea as we were very close to the island".

    Webster - "When I hear the noise, thought it was Bennett shooting because it was only a slight jar. but then there was an explosion, it knocked Bennett out of his turret and when I saw him standing beside me, we knew we were hit. Then the flames came. They blew back from the amidships radio compartment and I picked up the mike and told Mr. Russell we were on fire. By now I had my chute hooked on and Bennett had jettisoned the hatch. There was a solid sheet of flame outside." "Bennett's radio cord was caught so I kicked it loose and shoved him out, then followed. Chute opened easily and I looked up and saw Mr. Russell leaving the cockpit. We were about over the reef so I slipped the chute seaward. the Japs began shooting at us but the range was too great and their stuff fell short. A TBF circled over head and dropped a raft, Bennett got the raft inflated and we helped Mr. Russell on as he couldn't see very well. We had just started paddling when the first shell dropped. It was short about a hundred yards but the next one was closer. The next one was long and went over our heads. I figured they would have the range on the next one and it would plop right on us but it didn't happen. All the rest were long, their gunnery was poor, fortunately. About then some F6Fs appeared overhead, saw what was going on and made runs on the guns which stopped the shooting."

    Russell - "Webster called and said that we were on fire and burning badly. The cockpit filled with smoke but at first the flames weren't too bad. But the smoke choked and gagged me and burned my eyes. I kept calling to the crew to bail out but got no answer. the fire began to burn my feet then my hands. The throttle was too hot to hold but I kept the airplane straight and level as long as I could to give Bennett and Webster a chance to get out. The airplane was like an inferno, didn't realize an airplane could burn like that one did. I held it as long as I could, then I couldn't stand the heat any longer and figured if they are not out yet, it's them or me and I went over the side. I landed close to the raft and after some fighters stopped the shelling an OS2U picked us up, got us to a destroyer and eventually back on the Cabot."

    Pictures of the rescue of the Russell crew by Kingfisher from the cruiser Columbia


    Tham khảo

    • Percival
    • Watson
    • Stevenson
    • Stockton
    • Thorn
    • Turner
    • DD-523 (Chᬊ đặt tên) – DD-525 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
    • DD-542 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
    • DD-543 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
    • DD-548 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
    • DD-549 (Chᬊ đặt tên)
      Hải quân Argentina
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  • (Charles J. Badger đư𞸼 Hải quân Chile mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
    • (nguyên Anthony) (nguyên Ringgold) (nguyên Wadsworth) (nguyên Claxton) (nguyên Dyson) (nguyên Charles Ausburne)
      (nguyên Conner) (nguyên Zerstörer 2) (nguyên Hall) (nguyên Brown) (nguyên Zerstörer 3) (nguyên Aulick) (nguyên Bradford) (nguyên Charrette)
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      (nguyên Benham) (nguyên Isherwood)
    • (La ValletteTerry đư𞸼 Hải quân Peru mua làm nguồn phụ tùng)
      (nguyên Capps) (nguyên David W. Taylor) (nguyên Converse) (nguyên Jarvis) (nguyên McGowan)
      (nguyên Clarence K. Bronson) (nguyên Van Valkenburgh) (nguyên Cogswell) (nguyên Boyd) (nguyên Preston)

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    DD-546 Brown

    Brown (DD-546) was laid down 27 June 1942, launched 21 February 1948 by Bethlehem Steel Co. San Pedro, Calif. sponsored by Mrs. Claude O. Kell wife of Captain Kell, and commissioned 10 July 1943 Lieutenant Commander T. H. Copeman in command.

    On 10 November 1943 Brown departed Pearl Harbor in company with TF 50 enroute to the forward area. During Brown's very active service in the Pacific she screened carriers during the Gilbert Islands invasion (21 November-6 December 1943) Kavieng, New Ireland raids (25 December 1943-4 January 1944), Marshall Islands raids (29 January-7 February), Truk raid (16-17 February) Palau-Yap-Woleai raids (30 March-2 April) assault and capture of Hollandia, New Guinea (21-28 April) Truk raid (29 April) bombardment of Satawan (30 April) Ponape raids (1 May) Marcus Island raid (19-20 May) Wake Ireland raid (23 May) strikes in support of the assault on Saipan (1-26 June) Battle of the Philippine Sea, during which she rescued four American pilots (19-20 June), bombardment of Iwo Jima (4 July), assault on Guam and Tinian (12 July-6 August) Yap raids (26-28 July) Chichi Jima raids (4-5 August) raids on Palau, Mindanao, Talaud, and Morotai, supporting the capture of the Southern Palaus and Ulithi (6-15 September) raids against Luzon and the Visayas (21-24 September) raids on Okinawa, Formosa, and Luzon (10-19 October) Battle for Leyte Gulf (26 October) raids on Manila and the Visayas (6 November), and raids against northern and central Philippines in support of the seizing of Mindoro Island (15-16 December).

    Task Force 88 was caught in a typhoon (17-18 December) and strikes against Luzon were canceled in order to search for survivors of three missing destroyers. On 21 December Brown recovered 18 survivors of Hull (DD-350) and six survivors of Monaghan (DD-354). Brown then proceeded to Ulithi and received orders to return to Seattle, Wash., for overhaul. Repairs completed on 1 March 1945, she was ready for sea. After a brief stop at Pearl Harbor, Brown headed westward to take part in the Okinawa operation (1 April-30 June 1945), during which she was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation for her service as a radar picket ship 3d Fleet operations against Japan (30 June-15 July) and the minesweeping operations southwest of Okinawa.

    With the cessation of hostilities Brown served with the occupation forces in Japan until 28 October 1946. She then departed for San Diego, arriving 17 November 1945. Ordered to duty with the 19th Fleet, she went out of commission in reserve 1 August 1946 at San Diego.

    Brown was recommissioned 27 October 1950. She conducted intensive shakedown operations off the west coast and then reported to Commander, Naval Forces, Far East, in March 1951. From March until September she operated with TFs 77 and 95 and participated in the siege of Wonsan Harbor on two occasions. Brown returned to California in October 1951. Her next Western Pacific tour was between July 1952 and January 1953 during which time she operated on the Formosan Patrol. Since that time she has made four Far Eastern tours and has operated along the west coast.

    She was decommissioned 9 February 1962 and loaned to Greece, 27 Sep 1962 renamed Navarinon. Stricken from the USN list 1 Sep 1975, she was sold to Greece and served until stricken and scrapped in 1981.

    Brown received the Navy Unit Commendation, for services rendered during the Okinawa operation, in addition to 13 battle stars for her World War II service. She was awarded two battle stars for her Korean service.


    Brown DD- 546 - History

    Aircraft History
    Built by Martin as a model 162D. Delivered to the United States Navy (USN) as PBM-3D Mariner bureau number 45216.

    Wartime History
    Assigned to Patrol Squadron Sixteen (VP-16) with squadron code 16-P-13. No known nickname or nose art.

    Mission History
    On June 21, 1944 took off from Tanapag Harbor off Saipan piloted by Lt. Harry R. Flachsbarth on a night patrol mission to the west of Saipan. Before midnight, the last transmission to base was "investigating suspicious vessel". No other messages were received and efforts to reestablish communication were unsuccessful. When this aircraft failed to return it was officially listed as Missing In Action (MIA) on June 22, 1944.

    In fact, this Mariner spotted U. S. Navy (USN) vessels from Carrier Task Group 58 (CTG-58) at 11:12pm at roughly Lat 15-06N, Long 139-20E and made a low approach to within 8,000 yards of destroyers screening the force. In defense, the warships opened fire shooting down the aircraft in flames.

    After the crash, USS Brown (DD-546) investigated the crash site and located a wing tip pontoon and recovered printed matter which identified the plane as friendly. On June 23, 1945 CTG 58 reported the incident as a friendly fire shoot down to squadron VP-16 with profound regrets.

    Memorials
    The entire crew of eleven were officially declared dead on June 22, 1945.

    Seven of the crew are memorialized at the courts of the missing at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific (Punchbowl) on the courts of the missing. Ruth and Plant on court 1. Flachsbarth, Greenfield, Hilton, Hoskins and Grant on court 3.

    Four of the crew are memorialized at at Manila American Cemetery on the tablets of the missing: Benson, Wiggs, Wise and Douglas.

    Hoskins also had a memorial service on August 26, 1945 at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church.

    Wiggs also has a memorial marker at Pinecrest Cemetery in Warsaw, NC.

    Wise also has a memorial marker at Union Center Cemetery in Nappanee, IN.

    Relatives
    Steve Hoskins (nephew of Hoskins)
    "Hoskins was my dads cousin they were the same age and both served in the South Pacific Dad was on the USS North Carolina and as far as I know I am the only one in the family that still has this memorial pamphlet that I had found in dads things so this is all I have to go on."

    References
    Navy Serial Number Search Results - PBM-3D Mariner 45216
    "45216 (VP-16) missing on combat patrol 6/22/1944. 11 MIA"
    USN Overseas Aircraft Loss List June 1945 - PBM-3D 45216
    NARA VP-16 War Diary June 1945 pages 7-8
    (Page 7) 22 June 1944: Six planes returned safely from night patrol operations with the exception of the following. 16-P-13, Lieut. Flachsbarth in command did not return. His last transmission to the base was: 'investigating suspicious vessel.' All efforts to reestablish communications with this plane were unsuccessful, and no report from other units furnished any information as to the planes' fate until 23, when the following dispatch was received from CTG 58:
    'A friendly aircraft was shot down by ships of my division at 2312 King 21 June at Lat 15-06N, Long 139-20E. This plane appeared on the radar screen shortly unidentified aircraft had been picked up. Although it showed no IFF [Identification Friend or Foe] there was doubt as to its identity because of reports of search plane with IFF inoperative. Efforts were made to contact this plane by all communication channels available without success. The Marshall of DESDIV 104 which was in vicinity reported the same result. COMDESDIV 104 upon request stated that he had been unable to identify the aircraft as friendly. The aircraft seemed to be investigating DESDIV 92 and DESDIV 104. It maneuvered just out of range for some time and then started an approach on the Division at an altitude sufficiently low to make it clearly visible on the SG radar screen. Evasive tactics were being employed by the Division during the entire period of contact. Upon observing the apparently hostile approach of the aircraft several ships of the division requested permission to open fire. I granted permission to open fire if the plane approached within 10,000 yds. The plane continued its approach directly toward the division fire was opened at about 8,000 yards and the plane was shot down and burned. The Brown [USS Brown (DD-546] was sent to search the area where the plane crashed and reported locating a wing tip pontoon and recovering printed matter which identified the plane as friendly. NPM H 4454 reporting that a search plane was investigating a radar contact was received in the body at approximately the instant of opening fire. The report of this tragic incident is submitted with my profound regrets.'
    (Page 8) The following personnel were aboard 16-P-13 [crew list]
    Memorial Services Austin E. Hoskins AMM3c USNR Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Program, August 26, 1945 via Steve Hoskins
    News "Austin E. Hoskins Is Killed In Action"
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Harry R. Flachsbarth
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Lyman E. Benson
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Larsen G. Ruth
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Cecil H. Wiggs
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Austin E. Hoskins
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - George Plant
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Robert E. Wise
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - James T. Greenfield
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Lee R. Douglas
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Alexander Hilton Jr.
    American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) - Wallace B. Grant
    FindAGrave - Lt Harry Rudolph Flachsbarth (photo, courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - Ens Lyman Edwin Benson (photo, tablets of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - Ens Larsen G Ruth (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - ARM3C Cecil H Wiggs (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - Cecil Hertford Wiggs (memorial marker photo)
    FindAGrave - AMM3 Austin E Hoskins (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - AMM3 George Plant (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - Robert Eugene Wise (memorial marker photo)
    FindAGrave - ARm3 James T Greenfield (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - S1 Lee R Douglas (tablets of the missing)
    FindAGrave - AMM3 Alexander Hilton, Jr (courts of the missing photo)
    FindAGrave - AOM3 Wallace Blackwell Grant (courts of the missing photo)
    Thanks to Steve Hoskins for additional information

    Contribute Information
    Are you a relative or associated with any person mentioned?
    Do you have photos or additional information to add?


    History

    After intensive shakedown training off the coast of California, Hugh W. Hadley sailed 21 February 1945 in company with HMS Ranee for Pearl Harbor. The ships arrived 27 February, but Hugh W. Hadley was soon underway again, sailing 8 days later for Ulithi and the great Okinawa invasion. The ship departed in company with a large group of LST's and their escorts 25 March bound for the Japanese island stronghold, and arrived off the Okinawa group 31 March. As the night approach was made, Hugh W. Hadley led a group of LST's toward the beach, shooting down an attacking Japanese plane en route. The destroyer escorted her charges safely to the beach, watched them unload their troops and equipment the morning of 1 April, and then took up antisubmarine patrol station outside the transport area. As the bitter fighting ashore continued, Hugh W. Hadley helped protect against submarines and aircraft as the Japanese made a final effort to stop the invasion. The ship remained on patrol until 4 April, when she sailed with a group of transports to Saipan, arriving 14 April.

    Hugh W. Hadley was soon on her way back to Okinawa, however, and arrived from Saipan 27 April to resume her outer patrol. For the next few days the destroyer fought off numerous air raids, picked up a downed fighter pilot, and carried out antisubmarine patrol. She went alongside destroyer USS Brown (DD-546) 1 May for transfer of communication equipment, and then took up additional duties as a fighter direction ship for the Combat Air Patrols, so vital to the invasion's air cover.

    As radar picket ships were scarce, Hugh W. Hadley was assigned this duty on the afternoon of 10 May. Joining destroyer Evans (DD-552) and four smaller craft, she took station 15 west of Okinawa and early the next morning began vectoring aircraft to meet the oncoming Japanese. For nearly 2 hours the morning of 11 May, Hugh W. Hadley and Evans came under severe attack, as the Japanese mounted their sixth attack against American forces at Okinawa. Both ships maneuvered at high speed, downing many suicide planes and directing air attacks on formations of Japanese. The attackers numbered some 150 planes. After Evans took several serious hits and went dead in the water about 0900, Hugh W. Hadley fought on alone. At 0920, she was attacked by 10 planes simultaneously, from both ahead and astern. The ship destroyed all 10, but not without damage to herself. One bomb hit aft, a Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka hit, and two kamikaze crashes were inflicted on the ship as her gunners ran low on ammunition. Finally, as the attack ended, all but 50 of the crew were ordered over the side in life rafts, the remaining men fighting fires and working to control the damage. Though her engineering spaces were flooded and she was badly holed, Hugh W. Hadley was kept afloat by the determination and skill of her damage control parties and eventually arrived at Ie Shima. The attack took the lives of 30 crew members.

    During this remarkable battle. Hugh W. Hadley had succeeded in downing some 23 enemy aircraft and aided in splashing countless others. After temporary repairs, the ship was taken to Kerama Retto 14 May, where men from repair ship Za-niah worked on her battered hull. Hugh W. Hadley subsequently was taken to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, in a floating drydock towed by Avoyel (ATF-150), 15 July 1945, and after 20 days there began the long voyage under tow of the US Navy tug ATA 199 (still in service on the Great Lakes as the M/T Undaunted) to the United States. After encountering heavy weather during the passage the ship arrived at Hunter's Point, Calif., via Pearl Harbor, 26 September 1945. Decommissioned 15 December 1945, she was sold 2 September 1947 to Walter W. Johnson Co., San Francisco, and scrapped.

    In addition to one battle star for her World War II Service, Hugh W. Hadley received the Presidential Unit Citation (US) for her performance in the action off Okinawa 11 May 1945. Also several crew men received fame for their actions during the war.


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