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Livermore I DD- 429 - History

Livermore I DD- 429 - History

Livermore I
(DD-429 : dp. 1,690 1. 34893"; b. 36'1"; dr. 11'10" s. 33 k.; cpl. 208; £.. i 5", 6 20mm., 8 .50 cal. mg., 10 21" tt.2 dct., 1 dcp.; cl. Geaves )

Livermore (DD-429), originally planned as Grayson was renamed Livermore 23 December 1938; laid down 6 March 1939 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine; launched 3 August 1940; sponsored by Mrs. Everard M. Upjohn, a descendant of Chaplain Livermore; and commissioned 7 October 1940, Lt. Comdr. Vernon Huber in command.

Launched in the aftermath of the fall of France, Lirermore, after a brief training period, was assigned 29 April 1941 to the neutrality patrol. With ships like aircraft carrier Wasp (CV-7) and sister destroyers, she escorted to Iceland convoys bound for England. There ensued a shadowy undeclared war with Nazi wolfpacks. She was on convoy duty with Kearing (DD-432) when the latter was torpedoed 17 October. The hazards of this duty for Livermore also included a temporary grounding 24 November during a storm and having a friendly battery on Iceland fire across the ship.

The attack on Pearl Harbor and full U.S. participation in World War II enlarged the scope of her actions. On 7 April 1942 Livemore departed New York for the first of many transatlantic escort missions. Completing her second voyage to Greenock, Scotland, 27 June, she began coastal patrol and convoy duty southward into the Caribbean.

Livermore arrived off Mehdia, French Morocco, 9 November for the north African invasion and was assigned antisubmarine, antiaircraft, and fire support duties. Five days later, the invasion force successfully established ashore, she sailed for Norfolk, arriving 26 November.

The year 1943 began with patrol duty off Recife, Brazil, and concluded with a series of five voyages from 14 April to 17 January 1944 between New York and Ca~ablanca French Morocco. Her departure Hampton Roads 24 January foreshadowed a prolonged stay in the Mediterranean Sea. Two days earlier U.N. forces had landed at Anzio, Italy. Livermore arrived off this embattled beachhead 5 March. She prov. deaf both antiaircraft protection and shore bombardment support. After rotation to the convoy run between Oran Algeria, and Naples, Italy, she participated in the inn' al landing in southern France on 16 August. While supporting minesweepers on Cavallaire Bay with gunfire, Livermore was hit by a shore battery. The damage was slight, and her guns silenced the enemy guns. Lirermore continued on duty in the western Mediterranean until 26 October when she steamed out of Oran for overhaul in New York Navy Yard.

The war ended in Europe while Livermore was on the third of a new series of escort crossings between the east coast and Oran. Completing her last transatlantic voyage 29 May, she prepared for duty in the Pacific.

Though she departed New York June, V-J Day found her still training at Pearl Harbor. She reached Japan 27 September escorting transports carrying soldiers of the Army's 98th Divis Oll for occupation duty. Her stay in the Orient was relatively brief; for, after several voyages between Saipan, the Philippines, and 'vVakayama, Japan, Livermore sailed 3 November for the Aleutians. At Dutch Harbor and Attu she embarked discharges for passage to Seattle and San Francisco. Completing this duty 22 December 1945, she proceeded to the east coast, arriving Charleston, S.C., 18 January 1946.

Designated for use in the Naval Reserve Training Program, she was placed in commission, in reserve 1 May 1946. Livermore then decommissioned and was placed "in service" 24 January 1947, and was assigned to Naval Reserve training in the 6th Naval District. She was reassigned to the 1st Naval District 15 March 1949. While making one of her training cruises. she ran aground off of southern Cape Cod 30 July 1949. Refloated the next day she proceeded to Boston and w as placed out of service 15 May 1950 and inactivated. She was struck from the Naval Vessel Register 19 July 1956. From 1956 to late 1958, her hull was used for spare parts and experimental purposes. During this time, she was anchored off of Indianhead, Md. Upon conclusion of the experiments Livermore was sold 3 March 1961 to Potomac Shipwrecking Co., Pope's Creek Md. She was towed away for scrapping 17 April 1961

Livermore received three battle stars for World War II service.


USS Livermore DD-429 (1940-1947)

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Contents

Launched in the aftermath of the fall of France, Livermore, after a brief training period, was assigned 29 April 1941 to the neutrality patrol. With ships like aircraft carrier Wasp (CV-7) and sister destroyers, she escorted as far as Iceland convoys bound for England. There ensued a shadowy undeclared war with Nazi wolfpacks. She was on convoy duty with Kearny (DD-432) when the latter was torpedoed 17 October. The hazards of this duty for Livermore also included a temporary grounding 24 November during a storm and having a friendly battery on Iceland fire across the ship.


Medium and Signaling Edit

ARINC 429 is a data transfer standard for aircraft avionics. It uses a self-clocking, self-synchronizing data bus protocol (Tx and Rx are on separate ports). The physical connection wires are twisted pairs carrying balanced differential signaling. Data words are 32 bits in length and most messages consist of a single data word. Messages are transmitted at either 12.5 or 100 kbit/s [3] to other system elements that are monitoring the bus messages. The transmitter constantly transmits either 32-bit data words or the NULL state (0 Volts). A single wire pair is limited to one transmitter and no more than 20 receivers. The protocol allows for self-clocking at the receiver end, thus eliminating the need to transmit clocking data. ARINC 429 is an alternative to MIL-STD-1553.

Bit numbering, Transmission Order, and Bit Significance Edit

The ARINC 429 unit of transmission is a fixed-length 32-bit frame, which the standard refers to as a 'word'. The bits within an ARINC 429 word are serially identified from Bit Number 1 to Bit Number 32 [4] or simply Bit 1 to Bit 32. The fields and data structures of the ARINC 429 word are defined in terms of this numbering.

While it is common to illustrate serial protocol frames progressing in time from right to left, a reversed ordering is commonly practiced within the ARINC standard. Even though ARINC 429 word transmission begins with Bit 1 and ends with Bit 32, it is common to diagram [5] and describe [6] [7] ARINC 429 words in the order from Bit 32 to Bit 1. In simplest terms, while the transmission order of bits (from the first transmitted bit to the last transmitted bit) for a 32-bit frame is conventionally diagrammed as

First bit > 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, . 29, 30, 31, 32 < Last bit,

this sequence is often diagrammed in ARINC 429 publications in the opposite direction as

Last bit > 32, 31, 30, 29, . 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 < First bit.

When the ARINC 429 word format is illustrated with Bit 32 to the left, the numeric representations in the data field generally read with the Most significant bit on the left. However, in this particular bit order presentation, the Label field reads with its most significant bit on the right. Like CAN Protocol Identifier Fields, [8] ARINC 429 label fields are transmitted most significant bit first. However, like UART Protocol, Binary-coded decimal numbers and binary numbers in the ARINC 429 data fields are generally transmitted least significant bit first.

Some equipment suppliers [9] [10] publish the bit transmission order as

First bit > 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 … 32 < Last bit.

The suppliers that use this representation have in effect renumbered the bits in the Label field, converting the standard’s MSB 1 bit numbering for that field to LSB 1 bit numbering. This renumbering highlights the relative reversal of "bit endianness" between the Label representation and numeric data representations as defined within the ARINC 429 standard. Of note is how the 87654321 bit numbering is similar to the 76543210 bit numbering common in digital equipment but reversed from the 12345678 bit numbering defined for the ARINC 429 Label field.

This notional reversal also reflects historical implementation details. ARINC 429 transceivers have been implemented with 32-bit shift registers. [11] Parallel access to that shift register is often octet-oriented. As such, the bit order of the octet access is the bit order of the accessing device, which is usually LSB 0 and serial transmission is arranged such that the least significant bit of each octet is transmitted first. So, in common practice, the accessing device wrote or read a "reversed label" [12] (for example, to transmit a Label 2138 [or 8B16] the bit-reversed value D116 is written to the Label octet). Newer or "enhanced" transceivers may be configured to reverse the Label field bit order "in hardware." [13]

Word format Edit

ARINC 429 Word Format
P SSM MSB Data LSB SDI LSB Label MSB
32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Each ARINC 429 word is a 32-bit sequence that contains five fields:

  • In all cases using the SSM, these bits may be encoded to indicate:
  • In the case of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) representation, the SSM may also indicate the Sign (+/-) of the data or some information analogous to sign, like an orientation (North/South East/West). When so indicating sign, the SSM is also considered to be indicating Normal Operation.
  • In the case of two's-complement representation of signed binary numbers (BNR), Bit 29 represents the number's sign that is, sign indication is delegated to Bit 29 in this case.
  • In the case of discrete data representation (e.g., bit-fields), the SSM has a different, signless encoding. [14]

The image below exemplifies many of the concepts explained in the adjacent sections. In this image the Label (260) appears in red, the Data in blue-green and the Parity bit in navy blue.


DD-429 Livermore

Livermore (DD-429), originally planned as Grayson was renamed Livermore 23 December 1938 laid down 6 March 1939 by Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine launched 3 August 1940 sponsored by Mrs. Everard M. Upjohn, a descendant of Chaplain Livermore and commissioned 7 October 1940, Lt. Comdr. Vernon Huber in command.

Launched in the aftermath of the fall of France, Livermore, after a brief training period, was assigned 29 April 1941 to the neutrality patrol. With ships like aircraft carrier Wasp (CV-7) and sister destroyers, she escorted to Iceland convoys bound for England. There ensued a shadowy undeclared war with Nazi wolfpacks. She was on convoy duty with Kearny (DD-432) when the latter was torpedoed 17 October. The hazards of this duty for Livermore also included a temporary grounding 24 November during a storm and having a friendly battery on Iceland fire across the ship.

The attack on Pearl Harbor and full U.S. participation in World War II enlarged the scope of her actions. On 7 April 1942 Livermore departed New York for the first of many transatlantic escort missions. Completing her second voyage to Greenock, Scotland, 27 June, she began coastal patrol and convoy duty southward into the Caribbean.

Livermore arrived off Mehdia, French Morocco, 9 November for the north African invasion and was assigned antisubmarine, antiaircraft, and fire support duties. Five days later, the invasion force successfully established ashore, she sailed for Norfolk, arriving 26 November.

The year 1943 began with patrol duty off Recife, Brazil, and concluded with a series of five voyages from 14 April to 17 January 1943 between New York and Casablanca French Morocco. Her departure from Hampton Roads 24 January foreshadowed a prolonged stay in the Mediterranean Sea. Two days earlier U.N. forces had landed at Anzio, Italy. Livermore arrived off this embattled beachhead 5 March. She provided both antiaircraft protection and shore bombardment support. After rotation to the convoy run between Oran Algeria, and Naples, Italy, she participated in the initial landing in southern France on 16 August. While supporting minesweepers on Cavallaire Bay with gunfire, Livermore was hit by a shore battery. The damage was slight, and her guns silenced the enemy guns. Livermore continued on duty in the western Mediterranean until 26 October when she steamed out of Oran for overhaul in New York Navy Yard.

The war ended in Europe while Livermore was on the third of a new series of escort crossings between the east coast and Oran. Completing her last transatlantic voyage 29 May, she prepared for duty in the Pacific.

Though she departed New York 22 June, V-J Day found her still training at Pearl Harbor. She reached Japan 27 September escorting transports carrying soldiers of the Army's 98th Division for occupation duty. Her stay in the Orient was relatively brief for, after several voyages between Saipan, the Philippines, and Wakayama, Japan, Livermore sailed 3 November for the Aleutians. At Dutch Harbor and Attu she embarked dischargees for passage to Seattle and San Francisco. Completing this duty 22 December 1945, she proceeded to the east coast, arriving Charleston, S.C., 18 January 1946.

Designated for use in the Naval Reserve Training Program, she was placed in commission, in reserve 1 May 1946. Livermore then decommissioned and was placed "in service" 24 January 1947, and was assigned to Naval Reserve training in the 6th Naval District. She was reassigned to the 1st Naval District 15 March 1949.


Livermore I DD- 429 - History

First Impressions

  • Photo-etched parts. Note: Dragon provides both plastic and PE parts so that the inexperienced modeler does not need to use the PE.
  • A simulated wood base with styrene risers that look like the brass ones.
  • Six very detailed sailors in scale. These are better than any 1:350 figures that I have seen.
  • Clear parts for the spotlights.
  • Detailed decals with flags and deck markings.
  • A two piece hull that can be built as a display model or used in a diorama.
  • Camouflage marking guide.

Some of the styrene parts are extremely small requiring great care in handling or you will experience one of those dreaded "Oh Oh" moments. The "Oh Oh" moment is that miniscule segment of time between the moment you see the part fly off your tweezers and when you faintly hear it land in a place where it can never be found. Take, for instance, twenty-four tiny stands that support what looks like barrels on the deck.


Livermore I DD- 429 - History

Benson-Livermore Class Destroyer

Benson-Livermore Class Destroyer
DD 429 USS Livermore

This ship model is 6" long kit# DC153
Two models in each kit. All ships of the class can be built. Price. $30.95

Features:
- Two types of deckhouse newly tooled for Livermore and Monssen
- Extra-fine detail on superstructure walls like hose, ladder patterns delicately reproduced
- Extra gun-tub on Monssen w/20mm gun mounted
- Bridge supports and sky-lookout shield finely represented w/photo-etched parts
- Forward superstructure deck retooled for close mounted 20 mm gun tubs

- Round faced superstructure deckhouse is newly tooled
- Second torpedo mounts and crane w/great details
- Waterline or full hull version can be assembled
- Bilge keels are represented on lower hull by slide mold technology
- Funnels provided w/option of molded on ladders or add on photo-etched ladders
- Lower mount 5-inch guns realistically produced w/extra knuckle
- Turret w/realistic detail
- realistically detailed gun barrels are slide molded w/hollow ends
- Optional barrels w/blast bags provided for fun turrets
- Open topped upper-mount 5-inch gun w/textuted canvas cover
- Rudder is movable
- TRUE-to-scale ultra thin propellers reproduced
- Smoke generator w/fine detail
- Extremely fine detailed parts like davits for 26' whale boats
- 5-inch practice loading machine in great detail
- Quintuple torpedo launcher in fine detail
- 36-inch searchlight w/fine detail
- Special device included to bend specific photo-etched parts to correct angle

Dragon’s Sea Power series has launched a new 1+1 set of ship kits. The two-in-one combo features 1/700 scale replicas of the USS Livermore and USS Monssen. The USS Livermore (DD-429) was a 1,630-ton Gleaves-class destroyer commissioned into U.S. Navy service in October 1940. The release of this set coincides with the 67th anniversary of the famous Naval Battle of Guadalcanal (November 12-15, 1942) in the Solomon Islands, where outnumbered forces of the U.S. Navy, including the USS Monssen, took on a Japanese task force. In the confrontation, the Monssen was hit by 37 shells and turned into a blazing wreck that eventually sank with the loss of 60% of the crew. Despite heavy losses for both sides, the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal turned into a strategic victory for the Allies.

Dragon’s 1/700 scale set includes two complete ships-one each of the aforementioned destroyers. The kits feature a brand new deckhouse and items like additional torpedo launchers to correctly depict these two destroyers as they appeared in 1942. To enable all the fine detail to be incorporated, Dragon has included a plethora of photo-etched parts such as ladders, bridge supports and sky-lookout shields. A jig to help fold some of the etched-metal parts is also offered. Nice touches like a movable rudder, slide-molded gun barrels with hollow muzzles, and canvas-textured gun-turret top add a touch of class to these Gleaves-class destroyers. These model ships are particularly well crafted, and the inclusion of two ships in one box makes them even more attractive. Modelers can thus build a destroyer for both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters of operation.

[_private/ashey2.htm]

United States Benson-Livermore Class Destroyers
Class of 1937-39

There are two types of ships: Destroyers and the destroyed.

Backbone of the Destroyer Navy from 1940-1942

Benson-Livermore destroyer class synonyms::
Benson class, Mayo class, Gleaves class, Livermore class, Bristol class.
Benson-Livermore Class Destroyers :


U.S.S. VULCAN

The USS Vulcan (AR-5) keel was laid 16 December 1939 at the New York Shipbuilding Corporationin in Camden, New Jersey. Sponsored by Mrs. James Forrestal, wife of the Under Secretary of the Navy, Vulvan was launched on 14 December 1940 and commissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 14 June 1941.

After a shake down cruise to San Juan, PR, and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, USS Vulcan underwent a final fit out at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. She was assigned to Argentia, Newfoundland, the western terminus of the convoy routes to and from Europe. As the Summer of 1941 progressed and the war in Europe pulled more US ships into convoy duty, Vulcan was moved to Iceland where she supported a Task Force that included USS Wasp (CV-7), USS Mississippi (BB-41), Wichita (CA-45),and a squadron of four destroyers. Vulcan remained in Iceland through the winter of 1942.

Vulcan arrived in Boston in May 1942, where she underwent repairs. She returned to Argentia from June to November 1942, Vulcan then steamed to Iceland on 18 November, remaining there until April 1943. After repairs in Norfolk during June 1943 , Vulcan departed for the Mediterranean and Oran, then Algiers, Algeria where she spent the next year. In late summer 1944 Vulcan supported the invasion of southern France.

Vulcan returned to Norfolk and overhaul. Exiting the shipyard she steamed to the Pacific, where she operated out of Guadalcanal, Tulagi, Nouma and Ulithi. After the war ended Vulcan moved to Okinawa. Starting in September 1945 USS Vulcan supported various ships of the Occupation Force, at Kure, Kobe and Yokosuka Japan.

In March 1946 Vulcan headed for home. touching at Pearl Harbor and transiting the Panama Canal while voyaging to Brooklyn, New York.

Vulcan was homeported at Newport, Rhode Island after the war. In February 1954 she was transfered to Norfolk, Virginia. USS Vulcan spent most of the next 35 years on the Western side of the Atlantic, servicing the ships of the US Atlantic Fleet. She ranged from Newfoundland to the Caribbean. In October 1962 the Cuban Missle Crisis erupted and Vulcan supported the Naval blockade from San Juan, Puerto Rico.

In September 1964 Vuclan crossed the Atlantic for NATO exercise, returning in Decmeber 64.

Vulcan continued in Service To The Fleet through 1991.

USS Vulcan was decommissioned on 30 September 1991 and laid up at NISMF at James River, Virginia. Her hulk was sold for scrapping.

The USS Sierra (AD-18) operational history and significant events of her service career follow:


Ships of Honor

There is no greater symbol of a country’s determination to defend its freedom than a warship. Despite their name, naval warships are rarely used for wars they are mostly used to prevent them. As President Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed on 2 December 1902 during his second annual message to Congress: “A good Navy is not a provocation to war. It is the surest guaranty of peace.”

For a heroic sailor, honorable leader, or even a faithful chaplain, there is no greater service honor than having a ship named after you. In the U.S. Navy, six ships have been named in honor of 20th-century Navy chaplains, four of whom were killed in action. Two were awarded the Medal of Honor, our nation’s highest military award. Others were awarded medals such as the Purple Heart, Silver Star, and Bronze Star.

Here are their ships and stories.

Father Aloysius Schmitt

On 28 June 1939, Acting Chaplain Schmitt, a lieutenant (junior grade), arrived at his first duty station, the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37). On 7 December 1941, she was moored in Pearl Harbor. When the Japanese launched their devastating surprise attack, he went to the ship’s sick bay to assist and comfort the injured and perform last rites, the final prayers for the dying. The ship was then hit by an aerial torpedo. Water started rapidly gushing into the hull. Not many crew members could find a way out of the sinking battleship, but Father Schmitt and a few others found a small porthole through which to escape.

Father Schmitt helped all the others through the porthole, but when he started to get out himself, he noticed more sailors arriving in the space behind him. He then pleaded with those outside the hull to push him back through to help the remaining sailors. He died in the tragic incident, but he had managed to save several men.

The USS Schmitt (DE-676/APD-76) was commissioned on 24 July 1943. She started World War II service on convoy duty in the frigid North Atlantic. As a destroyer escort, she was primarily designed for antisubmarine warfare. Following that, she was converted to a high-speed transport for landing Marines ashore and was assigned to the warmer Pacific theater.

The Schmitt was decommissioned in 1949 and placed in mothballs. In 1967, she was pulled out of reserve and transferred to the Republic of China (Taiwan) Navy where she became the ROCS Lung Shan. She was finally decommissioned and scrapped in 1976, giving her a life span of 34 years.

Reverend Thomas L. Kirkpatrick

Thomas Kirkpatrick became an acting chaplain in 1918 during World War I. After the war, he joined the crew of the battleship Utah (BB-31) and was appointed as Asian Fleet chaplain and assigned to Samoa and Chefoo, China. He reported for duty in the battleship Arizona (BB-39) on 13 September 1940. Promoted to captain on 1 July 1941, he was slated for retirement on 14 July, but graciously decided to hang on for one last assignment during the tense prewar period that was already being described as a “national emergency.” He had been on board for only 15 months when the Japanese attacked his ship at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. He died when Japanese bombs destroyed gun turrets I and II near where he was assisting wounded sailors. His body was never found, but divers later found a clock that he kept in his stateroom. It is now on display at the USS Arizona Memorial Museum built above the sunken ship at Pearl Harbor.

The USS Kirkpatrick (DE-318) was commissioned on 23 October 1943. She initially served on convoy duty to escort merchants safely from submarines and made a lot of trips to the British Isles. She was reclassified as a radar picket, a ship that detects incoming airplanes. She was decommissioned on 24 June 1960.

Reverend George S. Rentz

George Snavely Rentz graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary, and during his career as a chaplain he served on board the USS Florida (BB-30), Wright (AV-1), West Virginia (BB-48), Augusta (CA-31), and Houston (CA-30). Late on 28 February 1942, the Houston teamed up with the Australian cruiser Perth to resist a Japanese invasion of the Dutch East Indies. They were extremely outnumbered, but they fought bravely. During mid-watch the next day, the Houston was slowly sunk by a barrage of torpedo fire. Commander Rentz gave his life jacket to a wounded shipmate and swam away. His body was never found, but many think he either drowned or was captured.

The USS Rentz (FFG-46) was commissioned on 30 June 1984. She was the first U.S. ship to visit mainland China since 1949, conducting a port call at Qingdao in November 1986. In 1987 she was sent to the Persian Gulf to support Operation Earnest Will. There she escorted tankers carrying fuel. She was decommissioned in May 2014.

Father Joseph T. O’Callahan

Father O’Callahan was ordained to the Roman Catholic priesthood as a member of the Jesuit order in 1934. A professor of mathematics, philosophy, and physics, he served as a director of the mathematics department at the College of the Holy Cross from 1938 to 1940, the year he joined the Naval Reserve Chaplain Corps as a lieutenant (junior grade). In early March 1945 he was assigned to the USS Franklin (CV-13), a large aircraft carrier.

On 19 March, a Japanese plane attacked the Franklin with two bombs, which went through the flight deck to the hangar deck and exploded. The explosion ignited gas tanks and ammunition. O’Callahan helped everyone he could and said some last rites. Later he gathered a group of men to help cool off the magazines so the ship wouldn’t explode. For that action, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. O’Callahan returned to Holy Cross in the fall of 1948 as the head of the mathematics department. In 1956 he published a book about the attack, titled I Was Chaplain on the Franklin (Macmillan Co.).

The first ship sponsored by a nun, the USS O’Callahan (DE-1051/FF-1051) was commissioned on 13 July 1968. She was leased to Pakistan on 31 May 1989 but given back in 1994. The O’Callahan was decommissioned in August of that year and scrapped in Hong Kong.

Father Vincent Robert Capodanno

Catholic priest Vincent Capodanno, a lieutenant in the Chaplain Corps, was stationed with the San Diego-based 1st Marine Division, which deployed to Vietnam in 1966. During Operation Swift in Que Son Valley, on 4 September 1967, elements of his battalion encountered a unit of about 2,500 Viet Cong. The Marines were vastly outnumbered. During the battle, Capodanno went to the injured and dying to do as much as he could. Wounded in the face and hand, he went to help a fellow corpsman who was yards away from an enemy machine gun and was killed. He was buried with military honors. Later, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. In recent years, it has been proposed that he be canonized as a saint in 2006 he was publicly declared a “Servant of God,” the first step toward canonization.

The USS Capodanno (DE-1093/FF-1093) was named for him. She was commissioned on 17 November 1973. An antisubmarine frigate, she is the only U.S. naval ship to be blessed by the Pope. On 30 July 1993, after 20 years of U.S. service, she was leased to the Turkish Navy.

Father John F. Laboon Jr.

John Laboon, a 1943 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, was a bold World War II submarine officer. While assigned to the submarine USS Peto (SS-265) he was awarded a Silver Star for personal heroism. (The Peto was named for a type of fish. All submarines were named for fish at that time.) He left the Navy shortly after World War II ended and became a Jesuit priest in 1946. In 1957, he returned as a Navy Reserve chaplain and was recalled to active duty in 1958.

Over the course of his 22 years as a U.S. Navy chaplain, he demonstrated his fearlessness on the battlefield with U.S. Marines in Vietnam. He was also—very fittingly—the first chaplain of the Polaris submarine program. Captain Laboon ended his career as fleet chaplain of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet. After he retired from the Navy, he returned to Maryland to oversee the building of a Jesuit-retreat facility within view of the U.S. Naval Academy. His final church assignment was as pastor of St. Alphonsus Rodriguez Church in Woodstock, Maryland, where he served until his death on 1 August 1988.

The USS Laboon (DDG-58) was commissioned several years later on 18 March 1995. She fired missiles at targets in Iraq during Operation Desert Strike, becoming the first destroyer of the Arleigh Burke class to launch Tomahawks in anger.

In 2012 the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, was attacked by terrorists, and the ambassador was killed. The Laboon was sent to the waters off Libya in case missile strikes were needed, but they were not conducted. She is still in commission as a U.S. Navy warship.

These fearless chaplains served with integrity. Their namesake ships are truly ships of honor.

Another Notable ‘Chaplain’

Samuel Livermore does not appear as a chaplain in Navy registers and would not qualify as one in the modern Navy. Today he would be considered a lay leader. He spent most of his time in the service as a purser—a ship’s supply officer—but he appears in the 1813 muster roll of the frigate Chesapeake as “Acting Chaplain.” In his era, a chaplain did not have to be ordained clergy that would not be required until the 1830s. Since chaplains often served as the captain’s secretary and schoolmaster for the midshipmen, many captains chose them for their worldly rather than spiritual abilities.

A Harvard graduate and practicing lawyer, Livermore was a friend of the Chesapeake’s captain, the famed James Lawrence. This placed him on the scene of one of the War of 1812’s most famous frigate battles, the fight between the Chesapeake and the HMS Shannon on 1 June 1813, in which a dying Lawrence is remembered as saying, “Don’t give up the ship!” As the British followed their captain, Phillip B. V. Broke, aboard the Chesapeake, Livermore either shot at Broke with his pistol or slashed him with his cutlass (accounts differ)—not typically behavior associated with a chaplain. While severely wounded, Broke survived Livermore was taken captive, returned to America in a prisoner exchange, and served in other ships as a purser until he returned to practicing law in 1816.


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USS Woolsey (DD-437), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was the second ship to be named Woolsey in the United States Navy. It is the first to be named for both Commodore Melancthon Brooks Woolsey and his father Commodore Melancthon Taylor Woolsey.

USS Ludlow (DD-438), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was the third ship of the United States Navy to bear the name. The second and third Ludlow ships were named for Lieutenant Augustus C. Ludlow, second in command of USS Chesapeake . He was, like his captain, mortally wounded in their ship's engagement with HMS Shannon on 1 June 1813, and died at Halifax, Nova Scotia on 13 June.

USS Edison (DD-439), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was the first ship of the United States Navy to be named for Thomas Alva Edison, an inventor and businessman who developed many important devices and received the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for his contributions to the Navy during World War I. Edison was one of the few U.S. Navy ships to be named for a civilian.

USS Ericsson (DD-440), a Gleaves-class destroyer, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named after John Ericsson, who is best known for devising and building the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor .

USS Swanson (DD-443) was a Gleaves-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for Secretary of the Navy Claude A. Swanson (1862�).

USS Eberle (DD-430) was a Gleaves-class destroyer of the United States Navy. The ship is named for Rear Admiral Edward Walter Eberle, who commanded the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets and was Chief of Naval Operations from 1923 to 1927. The destroyer entered service in 1940 and spent the majority of her career in the Atlantic Ocean. Placed in reserve following the war, the ship was transferred to the Hellenic Navy in 1951. Renamed Niki, the destroyer remained in service until 1972 when she was scrapped.

The third USS Decatur (DD-341) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was named for Stephen Decatur.

The second USS Sampson (DD-394) was a Somers-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for William Thomas Sampson.

USS Roe (DD-418) was a World War II-era Sims-class destroyer in the service of the United States Navy, named after Rear Admiral Francis Asbury Roe.

USS Benson (DD-421) was the lead ship of her class of destroyers in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Admiral William S. Benson (1855�).

USS Madison (DD-425) was a Benson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She is the third Navy ship of that name, and the first named for Commander James J. Madison (1888�), who was awarded the Medal of Honor during World War I.

USS Hilary P. Jones (DD-427) was a Benson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Admiral Hilary P. Jones.

USS Charles F. Hughes (DD-428) was a Benson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Charles Frederick Hughes.


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