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History of O-9 SS-70 - History

History of O-9 SS-70 - History

0-9
(SS-70: dp. 520.6 (surf. n.), 629 (subm.); 1. 172'4"; b. 18'~"; dr. 14'5"; s. 14 k. (surf.), 10.5 k. (subm.); cpl. 29; a. 1 3"; 4 18" tt.; cl. 0-1)

O-9 (SS-70) was laid down 15 February 1917 at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quiney, Mass.; launched 27 January 1918 sponsored by Mrs. Frederiek J. Sherman; and commissioned 27 July 1918, Lt. Oliver M. Read, Jr. in command.

During the final months of World War I, O-9 operated on coastal patrol and protected the Atlantic coast from U-boats. She departed Newport 2 November 191S for European waters, but the termination of hostilities brought the 20-sub force back to the United States.
Naval service and trained

submarine crews at the sub school at New London. Proceeding to Coco Solo, C.Z. in 1924, the boat was reclassified to a 2nd line sub during her year there. Returning to operate at New London, O-9 reverted to a 1st line sub 6 June 1928. Sailing up to Portsmouth, N.H. in January 1930, the sub returned to New London in March; the following February, she sailed to Philadelphia, to decommission there 25 June 1931.

Remaining on the Naval Register, O-9 was recalled to training service as U.S. involvement in World War II beca ne more imminent. She recommissioned at Philadelphia 14 April 1941 and went to New London 31 May. O-9 was to Eee but brief pre-war duty, however.

On 19 June, O-9 departed New London with other O-boats for tests off the Isles of Shoals. After the other 2 subs had successfully completed their tests 20 June, O-9 submerged at 0738 to conduct deep submergence tests, the sub did not surface thereafter but was crushed by the pressure of the water 402 feet below. The sub went down 15 miles off Portsmouth in the area where Squalus had been lost

Rescue ships swung into action immediately. O -9 , 0-10, Triton, Falcon, and other ships searched for the sub, and divers went down from 1300, 21 June until 1143, 22 June. Divers went to record depths for salvage operations but could stay but a brief time at the 440' depth, salvage operations were cancelled as they were considered too risky. The boat was declared a total loss as of 20 June at latitude 42-59-48 N, longitude 70-20-27 W. On 22 June, Secretary of the Navy Knox conducted memorial services for the 33 officers and men lost on the boat.

The boat was struck from the Navy Register 23 October 1941 and remains in the depths off Portsmouth.


O-10 served during World War I operating out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on coastal patrol against U-boat until 2 November, when she departed Newport, Rhode Island, with other submarines for service in European waters. The Armistice with Germany was signed before the ships reached the Azores, however, and the ships returned to the United States.

In 1919, O-10 joined others of her class at New London, Connecticut, to train submarine crews at the Submarine School there. In 1924, O-10 steamed to Coco Solo, where she was reclassified as a second line submarine on 25 July 1924. Returning to operations at New London, she reverted to first line on 6 June 1928. She continued at New London until January 1930, when she sailed north to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, returning to New London in February. She continued training duties until February 1931, when she sailed to Philadelphia, decommissioning there on 25 June.

With the approach World War II, there was a recognized need for numerous training submarines. O-10 recommissioned at Philadelphia on 10 March 1941 and went to New London in May. She departed on a trial run to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, on 19 June 1941, the day before O-9 (SS-70) failed to return. O-10 joined in the search for her sister ship but found no trace of her. At 1655 on 22 June, Triton (SS-201), with Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox on board, fired a 21-gun salute for the crew lost on the ill-fated vessel.

Returning to New London, O-10 trained crews there until war's end. She then sailed to Portsmouth, New Hampshire and decommissioned there on 10 September 1945. Struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 11 October 1945, she was sold to John J. Duane Company of Quincy on 21 August 1946.


History of O-9 SS-70 - History

Hunting New England Shipwrecks

Click on thumbnail image for a larger view

O-9 at dock
(U.S. Navy photo)

O-9 side view
(U.S. Navy photo)

O-9 Side-Scan Image
(Image courtesy of Garry
Kozak / Klein Associates)

Report of Loss
from New York Times
(Author's collection)

The table below provides historical and statistical data on the vessel. Some of the information may be incomplete. If you have additions or corrections, please e-mail us at the address listed below.

Attention Divers
The information on this page was obtained from a variety of sources. Although we have attempted to make it as accurate as possible, it may contain errors. For your personal safety, use extreme caution when diving on this wreck.

For more information on this wreck's location and history, and water and diving conditions in the area, contact local dive shop personnel, dive charter boat operators and local fishermen. Also check out the other shipwreck Websites listed on our Favorite Links page.

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SS Bolts

The SS Bolts are a common white supremacist/neo-Nazi symbol derived from Schutzstaffel (SS) of Nazi Germany. The SS, led by Heinrich Himmler, maintained the police state of Nazi Germany. Its members ranged from agents of the Gestapo to soldiers of the Waffen (armed) SS to guards at concentration and death camps.

The SS symbol is derived from the "sowilo" or "sun" rune, a character in the pre-Roman runic alphabet associated with the "s" sound. The Nazis derived many of their symbols from such pre-Roman images. Because the sowilo rune resembles a lightning bolt (with flat ends instead of pointed ends), the SS symbol has come to be associated with a lightning bolt image.

Following World War II, the SS bolts symbol was adopted by white supremacists and neo-Nazis worldwide. Most white supremacists use it in its Nazi form, as two bolt-like images with flattened ends. However, sometimes the symbol may have pointed bottom ends or pointed tops and bottoms. These variants of the SS bolts are most frequently associated with prison tattoos.

The SS bolts are typically used as a symbol of white supremacy but there is one context in which this is not necessarily always so. Decades ago, some outlaw biker gangs appropriated several Nazi-related symbols, including the SS bolts, essentially as shock symbols or symbols of rebellion or non-conformity. Thus SS bolts in the context of the outlaw biker subculture does not necessarily denote actual adherence to white supremacy. However, because there are a number of racists and full-blown white supremacists within the outlaw biker subculture, sometimes it actually is used as a symbol of white supremacy. Often the intended use and meaning of the SS bolts in this context is quite ambiguous and difficult to determine.


History of O-9 SS-70 - History

On October 3, 1973, President Richard M. Nixon signed Executive Order 11740, "Adjusting the Rates of Monthly Basic Pay for Members of the Uniformed Services" which provided for a pay raise of 6.2% for the uniformed members of the Armed Forces.

The United States military pay scales below became effective on October 1, 1973 and continued to be in effect until September 30, 1974. It is the basic pay amounts for the active components of the Navy, Marines, Army, Air Force, Coast Guard.

The pay rates are monthly, US dollar.

1974 Enlisted Basic Military Pay Chart

Enlisted pay for less than 2 to over 6 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Under 2Over 2Over 3Over 4Over 6
E-7538.50581.10602.70623.70645.30
E-6465.00507.30528.30550.20571.20
E-5408.30444.60465.90486.30518.10
E-4392.70414.60438.60473.10491.70
E-3377.70398.40414.30430.50430.50
E-2363.30363.30363.30363.30363.30
E-1326.10326.10326.10326.10326.10
Enlisted pay chart for 8 to over 16 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Over 8Over 10Over 12Over 14Over 16
E-9 919.20940.20961.50983.70
E-8771.30792.90813.90835.20856.80
E-7665.70686.70708.30740.40761.10
E-6592.20613.50645.30665.70686.70
E-5539.10560.70581.10592.20592.20
E-4491.70491.70491.70491.70491.70
E-3430.50430.50430.50430.50430.50
E-2363.30363.30363.30363.30363.30
E-1326.10326.10326.10326.10326.10
Enlisted pay chart for 18 to over 26 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Over 18Over 20Over 22Over 26
E-91,005.301,025.101,079.101,183.80
E-8877.20898.80951.301,057.50
E-7782.40792.90846.00951.30
E-6697.50697.50697.50697.50
E-5592.20592.20592.20592.20
E-4491.70491.70491.70491.70
E-3430.50430.50430.50430.50
E-2363.30363.30363.30363.30
E-1326.10326.10326.10326.10

1974 Officer Basic Military Pay Chart

Officer pay chart for under 2 years to 6 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Under 2Over 2Over 3Over 4Over 6
O-10
Officer pay chart for 8 years to 16 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Over 8Over 10Over 12Over 14Over 16
O-10
Officer pay chart for 18 years to 26 years of service.
Pay GradeYears of Service
Over 18Over 20Over 22Over 26
O-10

NOTE 1. Pay Grades O-9, O-10 and Fleet Admiral(O-10) received an additional "Personal Money Allowance" of $41.67, $183.33 and $333.33, respectively. While in Pay Grade O-9, serving as a member of the United Nations, the Personal Money Allowance of $225.00 was authorized. The Chief of Naval Operations pay is $3976.20, regardless of time in service, but is is limited by section 5308 of title 5, United States Code, as added by the Federal Pay Comparability Act of 1970, to the rate for level V of the Executive Schedule at $36,000 per year ($3000.00 per month).

The Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy's basic pay is $1,439.10 regardless of cumulative years of service.

E pay scale is Enlisted, W scale is Warrant Officer, O scale is Commissioned Officer. Effective October 1, 1973 through September 30, 1974.

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Current Military Pay

1970's Pay Scales

1974 Basic Military Pay Chart for the active duty personnel of the United States Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard.


During the final months of World War I, O-9 operated on coastal patrol and protected the Atlantic coast from U-boats. She departed Newport, Rhode Island, on 2 November 1918 for Britain, in order to conduct her first war patrol. However, the end of the war came before O-9 reached Europe.

After the war, O-9 continued in Naval service and trained submarine crews at the Submarine School at New London, Connecticut. Proceeding to Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, in 1924, the boat was reclassified to a second line submarine during her year there. Returning to operate at New London, O-9 reverted to a first line submarine on 6 June 1928. Sailing up to Portsmouth, New Hampshire in January 1930, the submarine returned to New London in March the following February, she sailed to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to decommission there on 25 June 1931.

Remaining on the Naval Vessel Register, O-9 was recalled to training service as American involvement in World War II became more inevitable. The 12 Tambor-class submarines were already nearing completion and 73 Gato class boats had been already been ordered when O-9 was recommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on 14 April 1941 and went to New London on 31 May.

In all, nine O-boats were recommissioned to serve as training submarines (O-1 through O-10, except for O-5, which had been sunk after a collision in 1923.) O-9, in particular, required extensive work, and still suffered mechanical problems even after being returned to service.

On the morning of 20 June 1941, O-9 and two of her sisters, O-6 and O-10, left as a group from the submarine base in New London, Connecticut, for the submarine test depth diving area east of the Isles of Shoals. Upon reaching their designated training area, some 15 mi (24 km) off Portsmouth, New Hampshire, O-6 made the first dive, followed by O-10. Finally, at 08:37, O-9 began her dive. At 10:32, O-9 had not returned to the surface.

Rescue ships swung into action immediately. Sister ships O-6 and O-10, submarine Triton, submarine rescue ship Falcon, and other ships searched for O-9. That evening, pieces of debris with markings from O-9 were recovered. In water 450 ft (140 m) deep, she was thought to be crushed, since her hull was only designed to withstand depths of 212 ft (65 m). [ 1 ]

Divers went down from 13:00 on 21 June until 11:43 on 22 June. Divers could stay only a short time at the 440 ft (130 m) depth but nonetheless set endurance and depth records for salvage operations until those operations were cancelled, as they were considered too risky. Rescue operations were discontinued on 22 June. The boat and her 33 officers and men were declared lost as of 20 June. On 22 June, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox conducted memorial services for the 33 officers and men lost on the boat.


The "Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps" was published annually from 1815 through at least the 1970s it provided rank, command or station, and occasionally billet until the beginning of World War II when command/station was no longer included. Scanned copies were reviewed and data entered from the mid-1840s through 1922, when more-frequent Navy Directories were available.

The Navy Directory was a publication that provided information on the command, billet, and rank of every active and retired naval officer. Single editions have been found online from January 1915 and March 1918, and then from three to six editions per year from 1923 through 1940 the final edition is from April 1941.

The entries in both series of documents are sometimes cryptic and confusing. They are often inconsistent, even within an edition, with the name of commands this is especially true for aviation squadrons in the 1920s and early 1930s.

Alumni listed at the same command may or may not have had significant interactions they could have shared a stateroom or workspace, stood many hours of watch together… or, especially at the larger commands, they might not have known each other at all. The information provides the opportunity to draw connections that are otherwise invisible, though, and gives a fuller view of the professional experiences of these alumni in Memorial Hall.


Deep Dive

WASINGTON (NNS) -- The Naval Historical Center (NHC) received the official report in April from a September 2004 survey, which shed light on the loss of the submarine USS O-9, which mysteriously sank June 20, 1941, with the loss of all 33 Sailors.

Coordinated with the NHC, the survey was undertaken by the National Undersea Research Center (NURC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the History Channel Series, Deep Sea Detectives.

“The NHC is responsible for archiving the Navy's history and as such, safekeeping this report ensures that the Center and the Underwater Archeology Branch in particular continues to fulfill its mandate," said Dr. Robert Neyland, Underwater Archaeology Branch, NHC.

The wreck of the submarine, renumbered SS-70 in 1941, was examined over three days using a NURC research vessel and remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The Research Center's staff and crew were able to confirm the exact position of O-9, which is situated at an upright angle at an average depth of 409 feet and remains virtually intact despite the decades it has spent permanently submerged on the New London seabed.

“The objectives of the survey included determining the condition of the vessel, collecting video and photographic documentation, and investigating a potential cause for the submarine's loss," said Dr. Susan B.M. Langley, senior scientist/principal investigator. "The report indicates that these aims were largely achieved despite the interference from marine life."

The film crew faced the challenge of navigating the ROV while carefully avoiding entangling fishing nets that surround the submarine's bow. When approaching from the stern, the survey discovered that the most severe damage to the vessel is in the vicinity of the engine room and the aft battery compartment.

"Dr. Langley's survey of the USS O-9 provides the Navy with a fresh look at the wreck and the grave site," said Neyland. "This survey and the following documentary illustrate that the Navy's history, tradition, and sacrifice survives in the sea."

Side-scan sonar image of the remains of the submarine USS O-9 (SS-70) off the Isle of Shoals, New Hampshire in more than 400 feet of water.

Due to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, just six months after the sinking, the tragedy was almost forgotten. This remained the case until 1997, when retired naval officer and diver Glen Reem personally persuaded Klein Associates, a sonar designer and supplier, to run a sonar search to relocate the stricken submarine, reopening interest in the O-9 mystery.

During the survey, a film crew from History Channel’s Deep Sea Detectives documented, filmed and chronicled the research team’s activities, which will be featured on an upcoming episode entitled “The Forgotten Sub of WW II”, which is due to air in May. Descendants of the lost Sailors also participated in the documentary by throwing a commemorative wreath in memory of their relatives who have not received the same attention as their shipmates lost in action during World War II.


Military

WASINGTON (NNS) -- The Naval Historical Center (NHC) received the official report in April from a September 2004 survey, which shed light on the loss of the submarine USS O-9, which mysteriously sank June 20, 1941, with the loss of all 33 Sailors.

Coordinated with the NHC, the survey was undertaken by the National Undersea Research Center (NURC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the History Channel Series, Deep Sea Detectives.

&ldquoThe NHC is responsible for archiving the Navy's history and as such, safekeeping this report ensures that the Center and the Underwater Archeology Branch in particular continues to fulfill its mandate," said Dr. Robert Neyland, Underwater Archaeology Branch, NHC.

The wreck of the submarine, renumbered SS-70 in 1941, was examined over three days using a NURC research vessel and remotely operated vehicle (ROV). The Research Center's staff and crew were able to confirm the exact position of O-9, which is situated at an upright angle at an average depth of 409 feet and remains virtually intact despite the decades it has spent permanently submerged on the New London seabed.

&ldquoThe objectives of the survey included determining the condition of the vessel, collecting video and photographic documentation, and investigating a potential cause for the submarine's loss," said Dr. Susan B.M. Langley, senior scientist/principal investigator. "The report indicates that these aims were largely achieved despite the interference from marine life."

The film crew faced the challenge of navigating the ROV while carefully avoiding entangling fishing nets that surround the submarine's bow. When approaching from the stern, the survey discovered that the most severe damage to the vessel is in the vicinity of the engine room and the aft battery compartment.

"Dr. Langley's survey of the USS O-9 provides the Navy with a fresh look at the wreck and the grave site," said Neyland. "This survey and the following documentary illustrate that the Navy's history, tradition, and sacrifice survives in the sea."

Due to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, just six months after the sinking, the tragedy was almost forgotten. This remained the case until 1997, when retired naval officer and diver Glen Reem personally persuaded Klein Associates, a sonar designer and supplier, to run a sonar search to relocate the stricken submarine, reopening interest in the O-9 mystery.

During the survey, a film crew from History Channel&rsquos Deep Sea Detectives documented, filmed and chronicled the research team&rsquos activities, which will be featured on an upcoming episode entitled &ldquoThe Forgotten Sub of WW II&rdquo, which is due to air in May. Descendants of the lost Sailors also participated in the documentary by throwing a commemorative wreath in memory of their relatives who have not received the same attention as their shipmates lost in action during World War II.


Submarine Force Museum Home of Historic Ship Nautilus

The keel of USS GROTON (SSN-694) was laid down at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, CT, on 3 August 1973. The bow of each new submarine is covered with a custom-designed nose cone when she is launched, so as GROTON neared completion her prospective commanding officer, Commander William Vogel, III, went looking for a design. Traditionally, ideas came from boats’ crews, but Vogel felt that this time, “since this is the first submarine to carry a name that is famous throughout the Submarine Force, it seems only fitting that we give Groton people a chance to design our insignia.” So Vogel announced a contest and within weeks he had 65 entries.

The Saga of the White Hat, Part II

By Education Specialist on Friday, 27 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

Ever wondered how the Navy white hat, also known as a dixie cup, came to be? Author Marke Hensgen told all in the November 1988 edition of All Hands magazine. The title of the article: “To Cap It All Off… A Fond Look at a Navy Trademark: Uses (and Abuses) of the ‘Dixie Cup.’ ” Check out Wednesday’s “Tidbit” for the first part of the article today’s portion is the second and final.

The Loss of USS RUNNER (SS-275)

By Education Specialist on Thursday, 26 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

Built at Portsmouth Naval Yard in Kittery, Maine, and commissioned on 30 July 1942, USS RUNNER (SS-275) remained on the eastern coast of the United States only long enough to conduct shakedown exercises before setting out for Pearl Harbor.

The Saga of the White Hat, Part I

By Education Specialist on Wednesday, 25 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | 4 Comments »

Ever wondered how the Navy white hat, also known as a dixie cup, came to be? Author Marke Hensgen told all in the November 1988 edition of All Hands magazine. The title of the article: “To Cap It All Off… A Fond Look at a Navy Trademark: Uses (and Abuses) of the ‘Dixie Cup.’ ” Today and Friday in “Tidbits” we’ll learn all about white hats, including how you can give them a distinctive style all your own, and what role a toilet can play in keeping them clean.

Baptism in a Bell

By Education Specialist on Tuesday, 24 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | 1 Comment »

As far as we know, only one baby has ever been christened aboard Historic Ship NAUTILUS (SSN-571). Her story, “Nautilus Baby Returns to Submarine as a Bride,” written by Jennifer Grogran and published by the New London Day on 28 June 2008, is the subject of today’s “Tidbit.”

The Loss of USS S-27 (SS-132)–But Not Her Crew

By Education Specialist on Monday, 23 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

In March of 1917, the U.S. Navy authorized the construction of a new S-class submarine which was laid down two years later at the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation in Quincy, MA. She was commissioned as USS S-27 (SS-132) on 22 January 1924. After stints in New London, San Diego, and Pearl Harbor, and an overhaul at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, she was sent to Alaska in May of 1942 to patrol the frigid northern waters in support of the war that America had only recently entered.

The Loss of USS O-9 (SS-70)

By Education Specialist on Friday, 20 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

On 27 July 1918, the United States commissioned USS O-9 (SS-70). Her crew stretched their new boat’s legs in the waters off the United States’ eastern coast, protecting the shores from marauding U-boats. On 2 November 1918 she left Newport, Rhode Island, for Europe, where she was scheduled to undertake her first wartime patrol. Fortunately for the world as a whole, but unfortunately for O-9’s eager crew, hostilities ceased before the boat arrived in Britain.

Where is the First and Finest Ensign?

By Education Specialist on Thursday, 19 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

On 19 May 1959, the New London Day published an article entitled “Nautilus Flag Presented [to] New Junior Naval Cadets,” part of the text of which is transcribed below. It has been 55 years since the ensign was passed to its new caretakers its current location is unknown to the Museum. If you have any idea where it might be, please don’t hesitate to respond to this post. We are looking not necessarily to acquire it, but to know where a piece of our boat’s heritage has found a home.

“Long before the atomic Submarine Nautilus made her historic trip under the polar icecap at the North Pole on Aug. 3, 1958, she came alive to her officers and crew, when she was commissioned as a ship of the fleet, Sept. 30, 1954 at the General Dynamics Corp. Electric Boat Division Shipyard in Groton.

“Capt. Eugene P. Wilkinson, commanding officer of Submarine Division 102, guest speaker and honorary national commandant of the Junior Naval Cadets of America, last night told 75 guests and parents of the 29-member East Lyme Ship Nautilus, ‘When our first colors were raised, it was at that moment we knew the Nautilus was a good ship.’

“ ‘…I treasure our first flag,’ he said, ‘and know that if our colors are entrusted to you cadets of the first ship commissioned under the banner of the Junior Naval Cadets of American, you too will cherish our flag and guard it well.’

“Cadet First Class Paul Bizaillon accepted the flag from Captain Wilkinson, as Cmdr. John McCaffery, organizer of the new group and Lt. Ernest L. Ballachino, commanding officer of the Flagship Nautilus of East Lyme, stood by.”

The Loss of USS BONEFISH (SS-223)

By Education Specialist on Wednesday, 18 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

Built by the Electric Boat Company of Groton, CT, USS BONEFISH (SS-223) was commissioned on 31 May 1943. Less than two months later she was on her way to her new homeport in Brisbane, Australia her first war patrol began on 16 September. The month-long prowl, which earned the boat her first Navy Unit Commendation, resulted in the damage of a freighter and two cargo ships and the sinking of two transport ships (9,900 and 10,000 tons, respectively) and a cargo vessel (4,200 tons). It was an auspicious beginning.

Making a Clean Sweep

By Education Specialist on Tuesday, 17 June 2014 at 8:00 am
Posted in Submarine History | No Comments »

When one thinks about submarines, the image of a straw broom is not likely to be among the first images that crop up. But strangely, these cleaning implements have a long and storied relationship with sea-going vessels. In the mid 1600s, Dutch admiral Maarten Troop, having just won an important naval battle in the First Anglo-Dutch War, had a crewmember hang a broom from one of the ship’s masts to signify that he had swept the British from the seas. Legend has it that his opponent, British admiral Robert Blake, responded by hanging a whip from one of his own masts to indicate that although he had lost this battle, he still intended to whip the Dutch into submission. (Ultimately, Blake and Great Britain would emerge victorious from the conflict.)


Watch the video: Колыма - родина нашего страха. Kolyma - Birthplace of Our Fear (January 2022).