History Podcasts

William Hobby

William Hobby

William Hobby was born in Moscow, Texas, on 26th March, 1878. Later the family moved to Houston and Hobby attended Houston High School.

In 1895 Hobby began working for the Houston Post as a circulation clerk. Later he became a business writer for the newspaper. This was followed by the posts of city editor and managing editor. In 1907 he left the newspaper to become manager and part owner of the Beaumont Enterprise.

Hobby was an active member of the Democratic Party and eventually became secretary of the state executive committee. Hobby was elected lieutenant governor in 1914 and governor of Texas in 1917. At 39, Hobby was the youngest man to hold the office. Hobby became an important figure during the First World War as over half of the country's military camps and most of its airfields were located in Texas. Hobby is credited with setting up an effective military draft system in Texas during the final two years of the war.

After completing his term of office, Hobby returned to the Beaumont Enterprise. Later he was to acquire the Beaumont Journal. In 1924 he became president of the Houston Post. With the help of Jesse H. Jones, Hobby became the owner of the newspaper in 1939. The Houston Post Company also owned the radio station, KPRC, and the television station, KPRC-TV.

Hobby became a member of what became known as the Suite 8F Group. The name comes from the room in the Lamar Hotel in Houston where they held their meetings. Members of the group included Lyndon B. Johnson, George Brown and Herman Brown (Brown & Root), Jesse H. Jones (multimillionaire investor in a large number of organizations and chairman of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation), Gus Wortham (American General Insurance Company), James Slither Abercrombie (Cameron Iron Works), Richard Russell (chairman of the Committee of Manufactures, Committee on Armed Forces and Committee of Appropriations) and John Connally (Governor of Texas). Alvin Wirtz and Edward Clark, were also members of the Suite 8F Group.

William Hobby died in Houston on 7th June, 1964. Three years after his death, the Houston International Airport, was renamed the Hobby Airport.


Hobby Airport (HOU) William P. Hobby Airport is Houston's 2nd busiest airport, after Bush Intercontinental Airport.

Originally established in 1927 as a private airfield named WT Carter Field, the City of Houston purchased the airport in 1937 and renamed it Houston Municipal Airport.

In 1938, the airport was briefly renamed Howard Hughes Airport, in honor of a major benefactor and airport user. The name was soon changed back to HMA, after the US government informed Houston that no federal funds would be granted to any facility named after a living person.

During the 1940's, major improvements were made to runways and airport buildings. It stayed busy during World War II, and by 1950, four airlines provided regular passenger service from HMA.

As national and international flights became commonplace in the 1950's, a new main airport passenger terminal was built, old runways improved, and new & improved runways added to facilitate landing jet aircraft. Dozens of private hangers and aviation facilities were added along Telephone Road on the airport's west side.

The current name was given to the airport in 1967, in honor of ex-governor and Houston Post newspaper owner William P. Hobby

In 1969, the first sections of the new Houston Intercontinental Airport (IAH) were completed, and Hobby's scheduled passenger traffic was relocated to IAH. Hobby Airport continued to serve private aviation as a "general aviation airport", which included FBO operations, corporate flights, flight training, & air-cargo operations.

In 1971, Southwest Airlines reinstituted scheduled domestic passenger traffic at Hobby airport. As IAH became more crowded, other airlines also began operations at Hobby. Twelve commercial airlines currently serve Hobby Airport.

The airport is convenient for business travelers, as it is only a few miles from downtown Houston, as well as near the massive oil refinery complex along the Houston Ship Channel. College students from nearby University of Houston and Rice University alsofind it convenient for travel to destinations in Texas and the surrounding region. Southwest's newly scheduled non-stop international flights to popular Caribbean vacation destinations is expected to greatly expand that traffic.

Financed by SW Airlines, the new international passenger terminal was completed in 2016. It added additional loading gates, customs facilities and a new parking garage.

Southwest Airlines began international flights to Aruba from Houston Hobby International Airport on May 9, 2015 and now provides service to an expanded list of international destinations.

SITE MAP


William Hobby - History

(APD-95: dp. 1,650 1. 306'0" b. 37'0" dr. 12'7" s. 23.6 k. cpl. 201 trp. 162 a. 1 5", 6 40mm., 620mm. 2 dct. cl. Charles Lawrence)

William M. Hobby (DE-236) was laid down on 15 November 1943 at the Charleston (S.C.) Navy Yard. Since she had been constructed in a drydock, there was no launching ceremony per se, and she was floated out on 2 February 1944. The ship was redesignated a fast transport, APD-95, on 17 July 1944, and she was completed as such at her builder's yard. She was simultaneously christened and commissioned at Charleston on 4 April 1945. Miss Catherine Hobby, the sister of the late Commander Hobby, sponsored the ship Lt. Comdr. Frank N. Christiansen, USNR, was her first commanding officer.

Following shakedown training in Guantanamo Bay Cuba, William M. Hobby proceeded to Norfolk, VA. From 16 to 21 May, the new fast transport conducted an "amphibious shakedown," including shore bombardment exercises off Bloodsworth Island in Chesapeake Bay. After post-shakedown repairs at the Norfolk Navy Yard, William M. Hobby held additional shakedown gunnery training in Chesapeake Bay before she departed Hampton Roads, VA., on 3 June, bound for Panama in company with her sistership Amesbury(APD-46).

William M. Hobby reached Christobal on 8 June, completed the transit of the canal on the 10th, and set course for the California coast immediately thereafter. Arriving at San Diego on the 17th, the fast transport got underway for the Hawaiian Islands in company with Ameabury and O'Reilly (DE-330) on the 20th.

Making Pearl Harbor on the 27th, William M. Hobby trained underwater demolition teams (UDT's) at Maaleea Bay, Maui, Territory of Hawaii, in July before she embarked UDT 29 for transportation to the west coast. Departing the Hawaiian Islands on 2 August, Willtam M. Hobby made port at Oceanside, Calif.— near San Diego—one week later.

Shifting briefly to San Pedro, the fast transport returned to Oceanside and disembarked UDT 29 on 13 August. The following day, Japan surrendered, ending the war in the Pacific. On the 16th, William M. Hobby sailed for Hawaii.

Reaching Pearl Harbor on the 22d, the fast transport got underway on the 24th for the Marshall Islands, in company with Ira Jeffrey (APD-44) and Blessman (APD 48), and arrived at Eniwetok on 1 September. Pushing on to the Philippines, she anchored in Manila Bay on the 5th. William M. Hobby cruised in the Philippine archipelago—touching at Subic Bay, Zamboanga, Mindanao, Bugo, Macajelar Bay and San Pedro Bay— until she sailed for Okinawa, and from thence to Japan.

Reaching Wakayama, Japan, on 28 September, William M. Hobby soon got underway for Hiro Wan, Honshu, with UDT 5 embarked. Daybreak on 1 October found the fast transport entering the Inland Sea. There she joined Traug.Thamorning, the ship sighted a floating mine off her port bow and destroyed it with 40-millimeter, 20-millimeter, and rifle fire. The ship's embarked UDT reconnoitered beaches and shore installations at Hiro Wan from 2 to 10 October to prepare the way for the arrival of American occupation troops in the Kure area.

On 11 October, William M. Hobby got underway for the island of Shikoku and arrived at the port of Mitsuhama later that day. The fast transport disembarked the 15 American Army officers, 18 enlisted men, and two Japanese officers whom she had carried as passengers and remained at anchor off Mitsuhama while UDT 5 reconnoitered the beaches there.

After returning once more to Hiro Wan, William M. Hobby got underway for the United States on 14 October. Proceeding via Guam, Eniwetok, Pearl Harbor, San Diego, and the Panama Canal, she arrived at Philadelphia on 9 December. The fast transport subsequently shifted southward via Norfolk to Green Cove Springs, Fla., where she arrived on 6 January 1946. She was decommissioned there and placed in reserve on 6 April 1946

William M. Hobby remained in reserve until she was struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1967. Transferred to the government of South Korea on a grant-in-aid on 23 July 1967, the fast transport was renamed Chr Ju (PG-87). Initially classified as a gunboat (PG), she was later reclassified in Korean service to APD-87 in 1972. She remained in service with the Korean Navy into 1979.


[William P. Hobby, Jr. at Deaf Smith County Museum]

Photograph inside the chapel display in the Deaf Smith County Museum. The people pictured are, from left to right, Ruth McBride, Lt. Gov. William Hobby, Mrs. Kent Hance, Mrs. Max Sherman, and Mrs. William Hobby.

Physical Description

1 photograph : negative, b&w 6 x 9 cm.

Creation Information

Context

This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Bill and Marcella Bradly Collection and was provided by the Deaf Smith County Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 257 times. More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this photograph or its content.

Photographer

Named Persons

People who are significant in some way to the content of this photograph. Additional names may appear in Subjects below.

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this photograph as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this photograph useful in their work.

Provided By

Deaf Smith County Library

Located in the western Texas Panhandle, the Library serves Hereford and the surrounding area. From its start as a small room in the Hereford Bank in 1910 to its current role as a technological and education center, the Library has continued to uphold its mission to provide access and promote learning in the community.


[Visit from William P. Hobby, Jr.]

Photograph inside the chapel display in the Deaf Smith County Museum. The people are, from left to right, Ruth McBride, Lt. Gov. William Hobby, Mrs. Kent Hance, Mrs. Max Sherman, and Mrs. William Hobby.

Physical Description

1 photograph : negative, b&w 6 x 9 cm.

Creation Information

Context

This photograph is part of the collection entitled: Bill and Marcella Bradly Collection and was provided by the Deaf Smith County Library to The Portal to Texas History, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this photograph can be viewed below.

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this photograph or its content.

Photographer

Named Persons

People who are significant in some way to the content of this photograph. Additional names may appear in Subjects below.

Audiences

Check out our Resources for Educators Site! We've identified this photograph as a primary source within our collections. Researchers, educators, and students may find this photograph useful in their work.

Provided By

Deaf Smith County Library

Located in the western Texas Panhandle, the Library serves Hereford and the surrounding area. From its start as a small room in the Hereford Bank in 1910 to its current role as a technological and education center, the Library has continued to uphold its mission to provide access and promote learning in the community.


President William Mckinley And His Hobbies

William McKinley was the 25th president of the United States from 1897 to 1901. He has the dubious distinction of being the third US president to be assassinated after Abraham Lincoln and James Garfield.

As a person, McKinley was known to be a kind and considerate person. Even after being shot two times by Leon Czolgosz, McKinley still called out to the people and the Secret Service not to hurt him. The simple truth is the McKinley was loved and admired by the people of America for his generous and kind nature.

McKinley was born in Niles, Ohio on January 29, 1843. He attended Allegheny College in Pennsylvania. Later he fought in the American Civil War under Rutherford Hayes. He joined the Civil War as private, and at the time of leaving the army, he had attained the rank of a Major. During the Battle of Antietam, McKinley risked his life to bring supplies for the troops. It act of heroism got him the much deserved promotion to a Major.

McKinley studied law, and after being admitted into the Bar, he became the prosecutor for Stark County, Ohio. When McKinley was a congressman, he supported protective tariff and was responsible for the McKinley Tariff Act, which allowed high taxation on imports.

McKinley was known to have an outgoing personality. However, he did not entertain people too often as his wife was emotionally traumatized by the loss of their two daughters. It is believed that McKinley did not have any hobbies, and he preferred to have a quiet evening at home reading poetry. He was not interested in sports.

Therefore, one can say that William McKinley's hobby was reading.

William McKinley was the 25th president of the United States. He was born in Niles, Ohio on January 29, 1843. He was the seventh child of William and Nancy Alison McKinley. McKinley father leased an iron foundry that he used to run. More..


Audio

Written by Cynthia J. Beeman
Read by Sara Hickman

One of the most accomplished Texas women of the 20th century, Oveta Culp Hobby excelled in numerous ways, including as the first director of the Women&rsquos Army Corps. A native of Killeen, Hobby developed an interest in politics and the law at an early age. She worked as a reporter for the Austin Statesman, and at age 20 served as parliamentarian of the Texas House of Representatives. She married former Texas governor William P. Hobby in 1931, and they were the parents of a daughter, Jessica, and a son, future Texas Lieutenant Governor Bill Hobby.

In 1942, with the country deep in the throes of World War II, Oveta Culp Hobby was appointed director of the Women&rsquos Army Auxiliary Corps, which soon became part of the U.S. Army as the Women&rsquos Army Corps. Under Colonel Hobby&rsquos leadership, more than 99,000 women served as WACs during the war. She returned to Houston in 1945, where she helped run the family-owned Houston Postnewspaper. President Dwight Eisenhower appointed her the first Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare in 1953, and she oversaw the creation and organization of the new federal agency. Returning to Houston again in 1955, she served as president of the Postand remained an influential business and civic leader until her death in 1995 at age 90. In 2007, the Texas Historical Commission placed a historical marker in Killeen honoring Mrs. Hobby&rsquos military service.

Oveta Culp Hobby and the Women&rsquos Army Corps historical marker file (Bell County), Texas Historical Commission, Austin.

Biography Source Information

Biographies are reprinted from the Foundation for Women’s Resources (now Women’s Resources), Dallas, Texas. They originally appeared in "From Gutsy Mavericks to Quiet Heroes: True Tales of Texas Women," video study guide, Austin: The Foundation for Women's Resources, 1997. Death dates have been added where needed.

Audio Source Information

Our project, "Texas Women's History Moments," received the 2012 National Council on Public History Outstanding Public History Award and the American Association for State and Local History Leadership in History Award. The audio clips were broadcast on KUT radio from 2011-2016 during Women’s History Month.


Program Overview

The CPM program is a nationally accredited comprehensive statewide management development program specifically for managers in federal, state, and local government and for managers in the not for profit sector. The program’s primary goal is to improve the performance of public and not for profit sector managers and the organizational performance of state, local and federal government. It is a comprehensive course of study by which public managers can acquire and apply the best practices and theory to their management behaviors and strategies using prescribed sets of professional standards. The curriculum uses theory as the foundation and applies it to practical problems facing the participant, their agency/department, and the citizens. Those who complete the program earn a national trademark designation of CPM (Certified Public Manager ® ).

The Texas CPM Program is a 7 course sequence which leads to a nationally accredited public manager certification. The CPM Program is offered by Texas State University's William P. Hobby Center for Public service.

In addition to Texas State University the CPM Program is offered by Texas State University in with the following Texas universities: Texas Tech, The University of Texas at Pan American, The University of Houston, Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin State University. --Corpus Christi.


Houston William P. Hobby Airport (HOU) History, Facts and Overview


The city's very first commercial airfield, William P Hobby Airport originated as a private airfield, which was purchased by the city of Houston in 1937. The airport opened just one year later, complete with its very own control tower. At this stage it was known as the Howard Hughes Airport, although it was soon changed to the Houston Municipal.

In 1950, Pan-Am Airways began operating flights to and from Mexico City and in 1954, the name was changed once more, to the Houston International Airport. Soon after, services began to Amsterdam and the existing terminal was extended and modernized. In 1957, the age of turbo jet planes meant that the runways needed to be extended to around 2,300 metres / 7,545 feet. In 1967, Houston International became the William P. Hobby Airport (HOU), being named after a former governor.


Today, facilities at the single, two-level terminal building of Houston William P Hobby Airport include a currency exchange booth, cash machines and a shoeshine stand. Choices for eating are very good, with over a dozen different eateries of all descriptions, including favorites such as Texas Express Pizza, Subway and Wendy's. Various shops are also spread throughout the airport, offering the chance to purchase some last-minute Texas souvenirs.

A large pre-bookable conference room with basic business facilities is available within Concourse C of the departures area. Also worth noting, the currency exchange center at HOU Hobby Airport offers further facilities, while wireless Internet access is also on offer in the terminal.


William Hobby - History

1742 - November 27, George Downing of Edgecome Co to Thomas Howell of Northampton Co. for value received by me (number of acres not given) a tract of land joining Seizmore, William Braswell and Richard Sumner Wit: James Bryant, Sarah Bryant Reg. Northampton Co. Aug. Ct. 1745 Robert Forster C. Ct. (Northampton Co., NC Pg 202)

1742 - December 20, Thomas Williams of Bertie to William Bryan of Northampton, 200 acres for 20 pounds, adjacent Sandy Run, Norfleet. Witnessed by Green Hill, Davy Stephens. (Northampton Co., NC 1-64)

1743 - February 7, Barnabe Bryant of Northampton to Abraham Bagget of same, 100 acres for 18 pounds, part of a tract granted to Barnaby Bryant 22 Mar 1743, adjacent Bryant 's swamp , Maherin River, Brigers, mouth of Rushing Branch Wit: Nicholas Boon, James Boon Reg. Northampton Co. Feb Ct. 1743 J. Edwards C. Ct. (Northampton Co., NC Pg 111)

1743 - February 21, John Hardy , Gentleman of Edgecombe to Isaac Winston of same, 150 acres for 10 pounds, on Dry Pond , mouth of Ferney Meadow , except all pines growing on land, part of patent to Thomas Bryan 1 Aug 1730, Witnessed by John Mozingo, John Landrien, Ann Mozingo. (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-287)

1743 - February 27, William Bryant and Barnabe Bryant of Northampton to Bartholomew Figures of Surry Co., VA, 170 acres total for 33 pounds, north side of Maherin river, (1) 100 acres joining the river, Abraham Bagget, second branch, part of a patent granted to William Brown for 640 acres 29 Nov 1706. (2) 70 acres, part of patent to Barnebe Bryant for 200 acres granted 22 Mar 1742 adjacent Nicholas Boon , Bryant 's swamp. Wit: James Washington , John Brown, William Vann , James Washington Jr . Reg. Northampton Co. Feb.Ct. 1743 J. Edwards, C. Ct. (Northampton Co., NC Pg 110)

1743 - May 2, James Turner of Virginia to Elisha Williams of Edgecombe 295 acres for 80 pounds, adjacent John Gray, Thomas Turner, the Cypress Swamp , Arthur Bryant . Wit: Thomas Turner. Simon Turner (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-153)

1743 - May 2, John Ryall of Edgecombe to John "Hinniard", 300 acres for 10 pounds, south side of Tarr River, adjacent William Bryan , grant to said Ryall 6 May 1742. Witnessed by Walter McFarlan Jr, Elias Hodges. (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-212)

1743 - August 15, William Bryan , late of Edgecombe, now of "Bartie" Precinct, to James Barnes of Bertie, 315 acres for 25 pounds, south side of Marattock, adjacent John Gray, Cypress Swamp. Witnessed by John Flowers, W. Roads, Thomas Norfleet. (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-169)

1743 - August 22, Thomas Wall of Northampton to William Bryan of same, 150 acres for 15 pounds, part of 340 acres granted Thomas Wall Mar 16 1743, adjacent Thomas Boon , Wild Cat Swamp, now in possession of William Bryan . Witnessed by John Wade, William Carter, Joseph Strickland. (Northampton Co., NC 1-82)

1743 - December 29, Edward Poore of Edgecombe to Joseph Hough of same, 480 acres for 8 pounds, west side of Elk Swamp , between Blue marsh and Little Swamp , plantation Poore purchased from William Weight of Virginia. Wit: John Bryan , Thomas Readney. (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-239)

1744 - May 2, Sarah Lide of Northampton County, widow, to James McManus of same, merchant, 9 slaves, horses, cattle, hogs, household goods, & furniture. Witnessed by Alex. (Alice?) Bryan , Thomas Jones . (Northampton Co., NC 1-157)

1744 - May 15, (?) Christopher Guin Jr merchant of NC to William Bryan of same, 400 acres for 50 pounds, north side of Tar River, part of 200 acres to John Green 20 Jun 1729. Wit: W Rhoads, Drew Smith. (Edgecombe Co., NC 5-262)

1755 - August 27, Arthur Bryant and Elizabeth his wife of Northampton Co., planter to Robert Peele of Northampton Co, carpenter 27 Aug 1755 125 pounds current money of Va. All my plantation whereon I lately lived with all the lands thereunto belonging, with 30 acres the Reverend John Boyd purchased of George Downing , joining other lands of the sd. Bryant and containing in the whole 400 acres which the sd Bryant purchased of his father James Bryant and the sd. James purchased of William Braswell and Mary his wife 20 June 1715 on the south side of Urah swamp Wit: John Duke, William Ruffin, Hance Hofler Reg. Northampton Co Feb. Ct 1756 J. Edwards C. Ct. (Northampton Co., NC Pg 245)

1755 - November 17, William Bryan of Edgecombe to Robert Wright of same, 321 acres for 30 pounds, south side of Town Creek. Witnessed by Solomon Nittle, John Dunn. (Edgecombe Co., NC 2-357)

1756 - February 15, William Bryant of Edgecombe to Thomas Henry of same, 210 acres for 30 pounds, south side of Tar River, bounded by terms in Joseph Lane's grant, and sold by said Lane to said Bryant 25 Mar 1749. Witnessed by Henry Wiatt, William Lane. (Edgecombe Co., NC 2-72)

1756 - April 4, Benjamin Bass of Northampton to Charles Bryant of same, 50 acres for 4 pounds, between Lewis Anderson and Elijah Bass . Witnessed by Benjamin Bryant , John Edwards Jr. (Northampton Co., NC 2-461)

1756 - April 19, John Perritt of Edgecombe to son Nicholas Perrit of same, 370 acre gift to son, north side of Tar River, upper side of Fishing Creek , adjacent McDaniel , and land previously owned by Bryant , patent to said Perritt 20 Nov 1739. Witnessed by John Horn, William Bryant , Ignatius Winsett . (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-17)

1756 - May 13, William Bryan of Edgecombe to Lewis Williams of same, 150 acres for 20 pounds, north side of Tar River, north side of Fishing Creek, part of patent to John Magee 6 May 1742. Witnessed by Samuel Ruffin, John Drew Jr, Joseph Stevenson. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-8)

1756 - October 12, Ignatius Winsett of Edgecombe to Thomas Barrow, Robert Killebrew, Moses Fitzpatrick, Joseph Stevenson, John Alsobrook, William Hobbie, William Bryant , John Wall, John Packer, Thomas Alsobrook, William ONails, John Norwood, Joseph Cotton Jr, Solemon Tharp, Daniel M____, Richard Hendrick, John Perritt Sr, John Hargrove, Henry Horn & Richard Sessums , 1 acre, west side of Fishing Creek, adjacent land said Winsett lives on, to erect a house of Worship, part of land said Winsett bought from Thomas Price, part of 609 acre patent to said Price 1 May 1752. Witnessed by Athur Croker, Sim Horn, Joseph Horn. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-109)

1757 - March 25, Capt Benjamin Lane and William Lane of Edgecombe to William Bryant of same, 100 acres for 125 pounds, north side of Tar River, adjacent John Grantham, land said Benjamin and William purchased of Robert Hardy factor for Hartley and Nicholson 23 Oct 1754. Witnessed by Joseph Lane Jr, Matthew Rushing. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-197)

1757 - April 28, William Lassiter of Edgecombe to James Lawrence , 160 acres for 5 pounds proc money, south side of Tar River , adjacent William Bryant , Rocky Branch. Wit: William Lane, Henry Wyatt. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-170)

1757 - May 14, William Belcher of Amelia Co., VA to Robert Belcher of Edgecombe, 400 acres for love he bears to his nephew & 20 shillings, north side of Tar River, land George Belcher bought from William Bryant , part of patent to John Green. Witnessed by William Irby, Edward Belcher. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-159)

1757 - May 18, Robert Belcher of Edgecombe to Joseph Montfort of same, 400 acres for 50 pounds, north side of Tar River, part of 2000 acre patent to John Green , then sold to William Bryant , then from Bryant to George Belcher, then to Robert Belcher through primogeniture. Witnessed by J Griffin. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-155)

1757 - August 25, John Massey of Greensville Co., VA, planter, to William Bryant of Brunswick Co., VA, 100 acres for 3 pounds 4 shillings 6 pence, adjacent Gilbert Weaver, Jeremiah Smith, John Williams, Robert Jones, and said Massey, Hezekiah Massey willed to son Wm Massey 15 Apr 1727, said Wm departed this life & said land went to said John as eldest son of said Hezekiah. Witnessed by Benjamin Ivie, George Pace, Christopher "Clerk". (Northampton Co., NC 2-403)

1757 - November 23, William Bryan of Edgecombe to John Drew of same, 320 acres for 25 pounds, south side of Fishing Creek, Witnessed by Samuel Ruffin, Thomas Wills, Mary Wills. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-319)

1757 - November 24, William Bryant and Elisabeth Bryant of Brunswick Co., VA to John Amis of Northampton, 100 acres for 61 pounds, adjacent Gilbert Weaver, John Massie, Robert Jones, John Williams, Edward Griffin. Witnessed by Thomas Amis, Thomas Dilliard, John Paul.(Northampton Co., NC 2-408)

1758 - January 17, Robert Webb and Elizabeth my wife of Edgecombe to James Moore, clerk, of same, 150 acres for 30 pounds, south side of Tar River , part of patent to Capt Thomas B r yant 28 Feb 1726. Witnessed by George Brown, Phillip Pettypool, William Haywood. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-249)

1758 - January 17, Robert Webb and Elizabeth my wife of Edgecombe to James Moore of same, 400 acres for 100 pounds proc money, south side of Tar River, adjacent Thomas Bryant and Francis Grice. Witnessed by George Brown, Philip Pettypool, William Haywood. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-251)

1758 - March 16, William Bryan and Arthur Bryan both of Edgecombe to James Smith of same, 190 acres for 20 pounds, on Cypress Swamp, land John Bryant bequeathed to his 2 sons. Witnessed by Drew Smith, John Young, Joshua Williams. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-309)

1758 - April 22, William Lane of Edgecombe to Thomas Fox Hall of same, 139 acres for 20 pounds, south side of Fishing Creek , adjacent Thomas Bryan, William Bryan , mouth of Bryant's Cove , Witnessed by James Speir, Benjamin Hart. (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-324)

1758 - May 7, John Edwards Jr of Northampton to Charles Bryant of same, 50 acres for 8 pounds, between land of John Bass and Edward Bass . Witnessed by Benjamin Bryant , Sarah Duffill. (Northampton Co., NC 2-462)

1758 - September 2, Joseph Bass of Granville to Charles Bryant of Northampton, 50 acres for 3 pounds, between Reuben Bass and James Bass, holding the young orchard where John Bass Jr, son of Edward Bass, did formerly live. (Northampton Co., NC 2-489)

1759 - February 19, Joshua Hendrick of Edgecombe to Ritiana my beloved daughter, all my lands and tenements cattle, hogs, etc. proviso my wife Ann shall have her maintenance out of the said estate. Wit: William Bryant, Drucilla Bryant , William Lane, George Baldwin . (Edgecombe Co., NC 6-362)

1760 - March 21, Richard (R) Bracewell, Senr . to Sampson Bracewell , for L50 lawful money of Great Britain a 119 acre plantation, more or less, on the south bank of Tar River adjoining James Braswell and said Richard Braswell . Of the above mentioned lands, 39 acres was part of a tract granted to Capt. Thomas Bryant on Feb 28, 1726 , and the other 87 acres was part of a tract granted to Francis Griss bearing date June 8, 1739. Wit: Benja. Hart , Mary Bracewell. (DB 00-101)

1760 - November 1, Simon West & Anne his wife of Northampton to Nathaniel Howell of same, 100 acres for 20 pounds, between Catawasky Swamp & Uraha Swamp, part of land from George Downing to Thomas Hollowell, adjacent John Screws, Israel Campbell. Witnessed by Bryan Daughtry, Arthur Bryant , Abm Baggott. (Northampton Co., NC 3-121(75)

1761 - February 28, James Lawrence of Edgecombe to William Ruffin of same, 160 acres for 17 pounds, south side of Tar River , adjacent William Bryant's corner, north to the Rocky Branch, Witnessed by Matt McKennie, John Lawrence , proved by oath of Samuel Bryant . Reg Mar 1761 (Edgecombe Co., NC 00-216 CTC)


Watch the video: Full Tour of Houston William P. Hobby Airport (December 2021).