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Marine Adder T-AP-193 - History

Marine Adder T-AP-193 - History

Marine Adder

A merchant name retained.

(T-AP-193: dp. 10,210; 1. 523'; b. 72'; dr. 26'; s. 17 k.;
trp. 3,674; a. none; cl. Marine Adder; T. C4-S-A3)

Marine Adder (T-AP-193) was laid down under Maritime Commission contract by Kaiser Co., Inc., Richmond, Calif., 7 March 1945; launched 16 May 1945; sponsored by Mrs. L. Jorstad; and delivered to her operator, American President Lines, 5 October 1945.

Marine Adder departed San Francisco early in November and sailed to Saipan where she embarked returning servicemen. She arrived San Pedro in early December, thence sailed on a second trooplift 29 December. She steamed to the Marianas, the Philippines, Korea, and Okinawa before returning to Seattle in March 1946. Between April and June she completed a Pacific run to Calcutta, India, and to Sbanghai, China; and, after returning to San Francisco, she entered the Maritime Commission Reserve Fleet at Suisun Bay, Calif., in 1947.

After the Communist invasion of South Korea, Marine Adder was acquired by the Navy from the Maritime Commission 24 July 1950 and assigned to MSTS I August 1950. Manned by a civilian crew, she carried combat troops to the Par East and arrived Korean waters 14 December 1950. After returning to the west coast in midJanuary 1951, she resumed her valuable support of the U.N. police action in Korea less than 2 months later and continued Far Eastern runs during the protracted struggle to repel Communist aggression in Asia. Between 6 March 1951 and 5 September 1953 she made 17 voyages out of Seattle to ports in Japan and South Korea, including Yokosuka, Sasebo, Pusan, and Inchon. After reaching San Francisco 5 September 1953 with homewardbound veterans of the Korean conflict, she arrived Seattle 8 September and was placed In reduced operational status.

Marine Adder resumed MSTS service 4 June 1954. During the next 2 months she completed two runs to Japanese and Korean waters; thence, -he departed Seattle 21 August to take part in "Passage-to-Freedom" operations along the coast of French Indochina. Steaming via

Yokosuka, she arrived Haiphong 9 September and embarked Vietnamese fleeing Communist oppression in the North to seek a new life of freedom in the South. Departing 14 September, she made six runs to Vietnamese ports including Saigon and Tourane and during the next 2 months carried refugees, French troops, and military cargo. She departed Vietnamese waters 14 November, touched at Yokosuka the 21st, and reached Seattle 6 December. She resumed reduced operational status 14 December.

On 24 December I955 Marine Adder sailed again for the Par East. She reached Inchon 11 January 1956;,Dperated between Korean and Japanese ports until 21 January; thence returned to Seattle via San Francisco 6 February. Placed in reduced operational status 10 February, she remained at Seattle until 3 June 1957 when she steamed to Astoria, Oreg. 'She entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet 8 June 1957 and was transferred permanently to custody of -the Maritime Administration 6 June 1958. Her name was struck from the Navy list 6 June 1958. She was sold to Hudson Waterways Corp., 4 August 1967, converted to a cargo ship, and renamed Transcolorado.

Marine Adder received eight battle stars for Korean service.


Marine Adder T-AP-193 - History

Bob graduated in the June, 1949 North High class. He enlisted in the US Marine Corps on July 5, 1949 in Des Moines, IA. His service number was ________. Bob's next of kin was listed as Mrs. Gladys Willis, 1318 10th Street, Des Moines, IA.

**USS General George M. Randall (AP-115)
Korean War
As an MSTS ship, USS General George M. Randall made scheduled runs between the West coast of the United States and the Orient until fighting erupted in Korea in the summer of 1950. She participated in the amphibious assault at Inchon which routed the North Korean Army and forced Communist evacuation of South Korea. After hordes of Chinese Communist troops poured into Korea and trapped American forces, she served in the evacuation of Hungnam, which saved the embattled G.I.'s enabling them to return to the fight.

She moored at New York, New York, on 26 May 1951, and made four voyages from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton before returning to the Pacific. On 11 March 1951, General George M. Randall departed Yokohama, Japan, with the bodies of 52 men, the first Korean War dead to be returned to the United States, including Major General Bryant E. Moore, who had commanded the IX Corps. Armed Services honor guards were in attendance at the departure, as was an Army Band, and was heavily covered by the press. The ship arrived at San Francisco, also carrying 1500 officers and men of the 1st Marine Division being rotated home for 30 day leave. She then returned to Yokohama on 24 October.

***1st Marine Division
(From the 1st Marine Division Presidential Unit Citation Award)
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting The Presidential Unit Citation to the First Marine Division Reinforced for services as set forth in the following citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the periods 21 to 26 April, 16 May to 30 June, and 11 to 25 September, 1951. Spearheading the first counteroffensive in the spring of 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, engaged the enemy in the mountainous center of Korea in a brilliant series of actions unparalleled in the history of the Marine Corps, destroying and routing hostile forces with an unrelenting drive of seventy miles north from Wonju. During the period 21 to 26 April, the full force of the enemy counteroffensive was met by the Division, north of the Hwachon Reservoir. Although major units flanking The Marine Division were destroyed or driven back by the force of this attack, the Division held firm against the attackers, repelling the onslaught from three directions and preventing the encirclement of the key center of the lines. Following a rapid regrouping of friendly forces in close contact with the enemy, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, was committed into the flanks of the massive enemy penetration and, from 16 May to 30 June, was locked in violent and crucial battle which resulted in the enemy being driven back to the north with disastrous losses to his forces in the number of killed, wounded, and captured. Carrying out a series of devastating assaults, the Division succeeded in reducing the enemy's main fortified complex dominating the 38th Parallel. In the first significant offensive of the action in Korea, from 11 to 25 September 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, completed the destruction of the enemy forces in Eastern Korea by advancing the front against a final desperate enemy defense in the "Punch Bowl" area in heavy action which completed the liberation of South Korea in this locality. With the enemy's major defenses reduced, his forces on the central front decimated, and the advantage of terrain and the tactical initiative passing to friendly forces, he never again recovered sufficiently to resume the offensive in Korea. The outstanding courage, resourcefulness, and aggressive fighting spirit of the officers and men of the First Marine Division, Reinforced, reflect the highest credit upon themselves and the United States Naval Service."


Marine Adder T-AP-193 - History

Bob graduated in the June, 1949 North High class. He enlisted in the US Marine Corps on July 5, 1949 in Des Moines, IA. His service number was 1100566. Bob's next of kin was listed as Mr. and Mrs. Lee Oliver Gates, 408 East Sheridan Avenue, Des Moines, IA.

She moored at New York, New York, on 26 May 1951, and made four voyages from New York to Bremerhaven and Southampton before returning to the Pacific. On 11 March 1951, General George M. Randall departed Yokohama, Japan, with the bodies of 52 men, the first Korean War dead to be returned to the United States, including Major General Bryant E. Moore, who had commanded the IX Corps. Armed Services honor guards were in attendance at the departure, as was an Army Band, and was heavily covered by the press. The ship arrived at San Francisco, also carrying 1500 officers and men of the 1st Marine Division being rotated home for 30 day leave. She then returned to Yokohama on 24 October.

***1st Marine Division
(From the 1st Marine Division Presidential Unit Citation Award)
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting The Presidential Unit Citation to the First Marine Division Reinforced for services as set forth in the following citation:
"For extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy aggressor forces in Korea during the periods 21 to 26 April, 16 May to 30 June, and 11 to 25 September, 1951. Spearheading the first counteroffensive in the spring of 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, engaged the enemy in the mountainous center of Korea in a brilliant series of actions unparalleled in the history of the Marine Corps, destroying and routing hostile forces with an unrelenting drive of seventy miles north from Wonju. During the period 21 to 26 April, the full force of the enemy counteroffensive was met by the Division, north of the Hwachon Reservoir. Although major units flanking The Marine Division were destroyed or driven back by the force of this attack, the Division held firm against the attackers, repelling the onslaught from three directions and preventing the encirclement of the key center of the lines. Following a rapid regrouping of friendly forces in close contact with the enemy, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, was committed into the flanks of the massive enemy penetration and, from 16 May to 30 June, was locked in violent and crucial battle which resulted in the enemy being driven back to the north with disastrous losses to his forces in the number of killed, wounded, and captured. Carrying out a series of devastating assaults, the Division succeeded in reducing the enemy's main fortified complex dominating the 38th Parallel. In the first significant offensive of the action in Korea, from 11 to 25 September 1951, the First Marine Division, Reinforced, completed the destruction of the enemy forces in Eastern Korea by advancing the front against a final desperate enemy defense in the "Punch Bowl" area in heavy action which completed the liberation of South Korea in this locality. With the enemy's major defenses reduced, his forces on the central front decimated, and the advantage of terrain and the tactical initiative passing to friendly forces, he never again recovered sufficiently to resume the offensive in Korea. The outstanding courage, resourcefulness, and aggressive fighting spirit of the officers and men of the First Marine Division, Reinforced, reflect the highest credit upon themselves and the United States Naval Service."

(From the 1st Marine Division Presidential Unit Citation Award)
The President of the Republic of Korea takes profound pleasure in citing for outstanding and superior performance of duty during the period 26 October to 27 July 1953 the First United States Marine Division Reinforced for the award of President Unit Citation:
"Landing at Wonsan on 26 October 1950 the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced) advanced to Yudam-ni where they engaged the Chinese Communist Forces. The heroic and courageous fighting of the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced), which was outnumbered but never outfought by the Chinese Communist Forces coupled with its fight against the terrible winter weather in this return to Hungnam, has added another glorious page to the brilliant history of the United States Marines. After regrouping and retraining, the First United States Marine Division (Reinforced) rejoined the United Nations Forces and began the attack to the north which drove the aggressors relentlessly before them. The enemy spring offensive during April 1951 which threatened to nullify the recent United Nations gains was successfully repulsed by the First Marine Division (Reinforced) and when other Republic of Korea Forces were heavily pressed and fighting for survival the timely offensive by this Division gave heart to the people of Korea."

****Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR)
WWI saw the first use of automatic weapons on a large scale. The Model 1918 Browning Automatic Rifle, known as the BAR, was created by arms designer John Browning to be a light automatic weapon which could be fired from the shoulder or hip. The weapon saw service with the American forces during the last stages of WWI, where it provided "walking fire" for attacks on enemy positions. It fired a standard .30 caliber rifle cartridge that was valued for its range and penetrating power. Between the World Wars, several variations on the basic design were made, including the addition of a folding bipod. The BAR was used extensively in WWII where it became an essential weapon in the American rifle squad. During the Korean War, the BAR again saw active service in all major campaigns. Its accurate automatic fire took a deadly toll on the enemy.

******USS General Walter H. Gordon T-AP-117
In November 1951, upon expiration of APL's charter, she was taken into the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS), reinstated on the Naval Vessel Register and placed in service as a civilian-manned Navy transport. USNS General W. H. Gordon (T-AP-117) departed San Francisco in December 1951 on the first of many trans-Pacific voyages in support of Korean War operations.


Marine Adder T-AP-193 - History

This USNS Marine Adder T-AP-193 License Plate Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each of our MilitaryBest U.S. Navy Frames feature top and bottom Poly Coated Aluminum strips that are printed using sublimation which gives these quality automobile military frames a beautiful high gloss finish.

Please check your state and local regulations for compatibility of these Navy Frames for use on your vehicle.

A percentage of the sale of each MilitaryBest item is forwarded to the licensing departments of each respective branch of service in support of the MWR (Morale, Welfare, & Recreation) program. These payments are made by either ALL4U LLC or the wholesaler from where the item originated. Our team thanks you for your service and your support of these programs.

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Brainwashed

Monica Kim’s new book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History, shows how the conflict set the stage for a new kind of battle—not over land but over human subjects.

In this adapted excerpt, Kim, a professor of history at New York University, examines how the American cultural understanding of “brainwashing” took root around the experiences of U.S. prisoners of war in North Korea and China, their experiences following the cease-fire with the U.S. Counterintelligence Corps, and what happened when some of them chose not to repatriate to the United States.

Monica Kim’s new book, The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History, shows how the conflict set the stage for a new kind of battle—not over land but over human subjects.

In this adapted excerpt, Kim, a professor of history at New York University, examines how the American cultural understanding of “brainwashing” took root around the experiences of U.S. prisoners of war in North Korea and China, their experiences following the cease-fire with the U.S. Counterintelligence Corps, and what happened when some of them chose not to repatriate to the United States.

During the Korean War, the prisoner of war emerged to eclipse the citizen-soldier as the dominant military figure in the American public’s imagination of war-making.

Take the story of Arden Rowley. According to his calculations, Rowley, a 23-year-old Mormon boy from the dairy farms and alfalfa fields of Arizona, had spent “32 months and 18 days” as a prisoner of war in Korea. On Aug. 22, 1953, Rowley boarded the USNS Marine Adder for a two-week-long journey from the port of Incheon to San Francisco. At that point, it had only been four days since the North Korean and Chinese communist militaries processed him for repatriation back to the United States, and he crossed southward over the 38th parallel through the village of Panmunjom. When a U.S. Army colonel greeted him hours after his release and asked him what he would like to eat, Rowley requested “a big bowl of ice cream.” And in Incheon, where the naval ships were docked, Rowley was able to purchase “American goods for the first time in more than three years.” But the pleasure of 1950s America through the taste of ice cream and display of goods was brief. Once he boarded the Marine Adder, Rowley “was told … to proceed to a certain room for … interrogation and knock on the door.”

“About three days after we were freed,” recalled Johnny Moore, another former POW, “we got on the ship. And thanks to the U.S. military, instead of flying us home as they should have, they took their own sweet time on the ocean, because they planned to interrogate us all the way across the ocean.” The U.S. military had indeed prepared for these extensive interrogations by conducting some strategic “carpentry work” on these ships, to use the words of the historian Raymond Lech in his book Broken Soldiers. “Numerous booths, about four by four, were constructed,” noted Lech, and each booth “contained a small field desk and two chairs.” In essence, ships like Rowley’s Marine Adder “became floating interrogation centers for the Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) of the U.S. Army.” Michael Cornwell, one of the POW repatriates, said, “You could call what happened on the ship coming home debriefing or an interrogation, but it lasted all day long—some eight hours.” The soldier, who was supposedly a weapon of American warfare, had now become the target of American military intelligence.

The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War: The Untold History by Monica Kim, Princeton University Press, 452 pp., $35, Feb. 5

Arden Rowley was one of 4,428 U.S. prisoners of war repatriated from the Chinese and North Korean camps during the war. Eighty-eight percent of these men had been captured in the first year of the war, from July 1950 to June 1951, which meant that the majority of U.S. POWs had been living in the Chinese and North Korean POW camps for almost three years. Some of them underwent interrogation repeatedly. When these American POWs were released and found themselves in a U.S. military hospital in Tokyo or on a U.S. naval ship headed for San Francisco, they quickly discovered that repatriation simply marked a turning point—rather than an end—to the demand on them to narrate endlessly their lives and experiences. The U.S. military demanded of these men details, chronologies, and names of those who had been either “collaborators” or “reactionaries.” Agents of the Counter Intelligence Corps and the FBI followed these men far beyond the port of San Francisco. The entire apparatus of the U.S. national security state was mobilized on both sides of the Pacific to diagnose, survey, and punish a critical domain of American warfare: the domestic militarized psyche. And “brainwashing” became the lit match that exploded the tinderbox of American anxiety over being unable to control the meanings of a war that was not a war.

By the time Rowley and other American POWs crossed into the so-called Freedom Village, created by the United Nations to greet repatriating POWs on the 38th parallel, the phrase “brainwashing” had entered heavy rotation on the front pages of American newspapers, specifically in regard to the American POW. In April 1953, Neal Stanford, a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, published an article titled “Red ‘Teaching’ of Prisoners Stirs U.S.,” where he concluded, “It is therefore not entirely fantastic to believe that when a voluntary exchange of PWs in Korea is actually arranged, there may be some Americans, as well as thousands of Communists, who will refuse to be exchanged. … And it would present the United States with a most serious problem—how to insist on the ‘unwashing’ of any Americans who may refuse to be repatriated so they can make a free and honest decision of their own.” During that very same month, Allen Dulles, the director of the CIA, commented on the issue of “brainwashing” in a speech in front of Princeton University alumni: “The Communists are now applying the brainwashing techniques to American prisoners in Korea, and it is not beyond the range of possibility that considerable numbers of our own boys there might be so indoctrinated as to be induced, temporarily at least, to renounce country and family.”

That possibility became a reality with the signing of the cease-fire in July 1953, when 21 U.S. POWs announced that they had chosen to not repatriate to the United States and would instead stay in China at the close of the fighting on the battlefields.

The American POW, under the specter of what the U.S. military referred to as “Oriental” brainwashing, thus became a cipher for American unease about how the fast-moving backdrop of capitalism, the Cold War, and a decolonizing globe was challenging the seemingly assured coherence of the American individual self. Free choice in the liberal individualistic sense was both the beacon of light and the litmus test for the full expression of selfhood. According to the U.S.-proposed plan of POW voluntary repatriation presented at the armistice meetings, at the end of the conflict, a soldier would be able to “exercise his individual option as to whether he will return to his own side or join the other side.” In his argument, Adm. Ruthven Libby, the U.S. delegate, used phrases such as “principle of freedom of choice” and “the right of individual self-determination.” The United States had supposedly offered this choice to the Korean and Chinese prisoners of war and thereby cemented the POW voluntary repatriation proposal within a halo of U.S.-sanctioned redemption from which, if the POW elected the U.S.-backed states of the Republic of Korea or Taiwan, the Korean or Chinese POW could emerge as aspiring liberal subjects. On the other hand, the American citizen-soldier was a priori coherent, whole, and present on the stage of history. But how did that idea transfer if and when the American POW made a choice that rejected this premise?

When confronted with the 21 POWs who chose to stay in China—as well as reports that hundreds of American POWs had collaborated in some form with the Chinese and North Korean authorities in the camps—the U.S. military, government, and public had to neutralize these American POWs and the potential visibility of their politics by rendering them again as “vulnerable” subjects. “Brainwashing” became the term that grabbed the media spotlight—and absorbed the American public’s imagination when it came to comprehending what had happened.

In other words, to make sense of those who remained behind, these American POWs were painted as men who had essentially not made a choice and were instead victims of an “Oriental’ communist regime. Whether in the Hollywood film The Manchurian Candidate or Virginia Pasley’s 21 Stayed, the American POW of the Korean War was emblazoned publicly—with startling rapidity—as the symptom of a social malady, a national pathology, or an even deeper yet unidentified crisis of the United States.

The crisis over the POW during the Korean War would precipitate a formal reconceptualization of the nature of warfare. The “brainwashing” anxiety around the American prisoner of war laid bare that a basic tenet of U.S. imperial warfare vis-a-vis the global order had been challenged: The United States was supposed to be the power that transformed the enemy in wartime encounters, not the other way around.

Monica Kim is assistant professor of history at New York University and author of The Interrogation Rooms of the Korean War.


Origins of Prohibition

In the 1820s and �s, a wave of religious revivalism swept the United States, leading to increased calls for temperance, as well as other “perfectionist” movements such as the abolitionist movement to end slavery. In 1838, the state of Massachusetts passed a temperance law banning the sale of spirits in less than 15-gallon quantities though the law was repealed two years later, it set a precedent for such legislation. Maine passed the first state prohibition laws in 1846, followed by a stricter law in 1851. A number of other states had followed suit by the time the Civil War began in 1861.

Did you know? In 1932, Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated the incumbent President Herbert Hoover, who once called Prohibition "the great social and economic experiment, noble in motive and far reaching in purpose." Some say FDR celebrated the repeal of Prohibition by enjoying a dirty martini, his preferred drink.

By the turn of the century, temperance societies were a common fixture in communities across the United States. Women played a strong role in the temperance movement, as alcohol was seen as a destructive force in families and marriages. In 1906, a new wave of attacks began on the sale of liquor, led by the Anti-Saloon League (established in 1893) and driven by a reaction to urban growth, as well as the rise of evangelical Protestantism and its view of saloon culture as corrupt and ungodly. In addition, many factory owners supported prohibition in their desire to prevent accidents and increase the efficiency of their workers in an era of increased industrial production and extended working hours.


USS Marine Adder - united states navy ship names ..

USNS Marine Adder as MSC Time Charter, a C4 S A3. C4 S B1 only SS Marine Dolphin Became hospital ship USS Tranquillity AH 14. SS Marine Hawk. Today in history, July 29 The Columbus Dispatch Columbus, OH. To asbestos on Navy ships. Contact us now for a free mesothelioma case evaluation if you have been diagnosed. SS Marine Adder SS Marine Jumper. Marjorie Parsons Official Free Methodist World Missions. San Francisco to the islands on USS Admiral CF Hughes and USNS Marine Adder. He also talks of his return home to the states on USS General WF Hase.

Today in history, July 29 The Palm Beach Post West Palm Beach.

The Marine Adder class of transports were Type C4 class ship built for the United States USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 USNS Marine Lynx T AP 194 USNS Marine Phoenix T AP 195 USNS Marine Carp T AP 199 USNS Marine. PAUL WEGNER 1921 1980 SGT US Army WWII & Korea. Hildegard recalls her trip from Shanghai, China to San Francisco, CA, on the board of the U.S. Army transporter Marine Adder, in August 1947. She explains​. Birthday parade held for local World War Leader Vindicator. S. Brandon, Sgt. James Gillespie traveling on the USS Celeno, husband of Mrs. Lacinia Gillespie and Sgt. Gordon E. Kendall on the USS Marine Adder. Christmas 1945: A Mixture of Holiday Joy, Cold Weather, War. From the US merchant marine Website Marias TAO 57 Marine Adder TAP 193 Marine Carp TAP 199 Marine Lynx TAP 194 Marine.

Today in history, July 29 The Florida Times Union Jacksonville, FL.

Eral Charles P. Gross to the Maritime Commission to the U. S. Navy On her next outbound voyage the MARINE ADDER left San Pedro. The WW II Troopship Page S. This USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 Motorcycle Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each frame is made with fiberglass. Seven Mere Operators Sign New 5% Contract Other Talks Continue. USNS Marine Adder. No description defined. In more languages. Spanish. No label defined. No description defined. Traditional Chinese.

USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 wand.

Sea Adder I, US War Shipping Administration. ANMH. New Orleans 6 14 46: Decommissioned at Norfolk and redelivered to U.S. Maritime Commission. Today in history, July 29 Daily Commercial Leesburg, FL. Rear Admiral John D. Ford U. S. Navy. Pages: 1 18 OFFICIAL TRIALS OF SUBMARINE BOATS ADDER AND MOCCASIN ON PRACTICAL REQUIREMENTS AND THE SUCCESSFUL OPERATION OF MARINE WATER‐​TUBE BOILERS.

Morris Lee Palmer Missouri State Society Daughters of the.

The following is a list of U.S. Navy auxiliary ships that may have been USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 USNS Marine Carp T AP 199. 1953 US SOLDIERS on Troopship USNS Marine Adder Press Photo. This page features additional views concerning USNS General M. C. Meigs General R. L. Howze T AP 134, Marine Phoenix T AP 195, Marine Adder.

USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 Visually.

Distinguished Flying Cross from U.S. Vice President Charles Curtis, sit in hospital room of transport Marine Adder that docked in Seattle, Следующая Войти Настройки Конфиденциальность Условия. Type C4 class ship pedia. USNS Marine Adder T AP 193, one of six MSTS troop transports to take part in the operation, loaded her first refugees on September 13.

USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 pedia.

Supporting U.S. forces through nearly a decade of operations who as a Marine lieutenant colonel was. This idea Base Adder, near Nasiriyah, Iraq. MRAPs. A PUBLICATION OF THE HAMPTON ROADS. Following Pearl Harbor in December, 1941, he enlisted in the US Marine Corps Coast Village Solscho Ri aboard the USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 to Kobe,​. All Members Ship List US Navy Armed Guard. USNS Marine Adder T AP 193 USNS Marine Carp T AP 199 USNS Marine Lynx T AP 194 USNS Marine Phoenix T AP 195 USNS Marine Serpent.

MSTS SHIPS yo hi red devils.

USNS Marine Adder was a troop ship for the United States Navy in the 1950s. She was built in 1945 for the United States Maritime Commission as SS Marine Adder, a Type C4 S A3 troop ship, by the Kaiser Company during World War II. Special Report: China expands amphibious forces in challenge to. Served in this Auxiliary? Find People you served with from USS Marine Adder ​AP 193. Join TWS for Free Today!. Roy D. Graves Post 1194 Potsdam Public Museum. Comments: Summer of 1951 sent to Korea Via USS Marine Adder Trained at Camp Chaffee, Arkansas in 1951 with Combat Command B 5th Armored Division​. Guttman, Helga Marcks Birmingham Holocaust Education Center. Marjorie, along with her husband and 16 month old son Karl boarded the SS Marine Adder, a converted Marine troopship, on August 8, 1947. Their total family​. AP 125 and the USNS Gen. John Pope AP 110 Web Template. About the middle of the nineteenth century, an officer of the Austrian Marine Artillery These early A type submarines such as the USS ADDER and USS. World War II troopships US Army Center of Military History. USNS Marine Adder T AP–193 was a troop ship. Soldiers climb down netting on the sides of the attack transport USS McCawley on 14 June. USS Hamblen, a​.

Pluck, Pogy, and Portland: Naming Navy Ships in World War II The.

Where he caught the troop ship USS Thurston AP 77. He sailed to people. Morris sailed back to the United States on the USNS. Marine Adder T AP–193. Auxiliary Ships Asbestos Jobsites Hissey, Mulderig & Friend. Thanks to Wesley for authorizing us to mirror this unique contribution to the history of WW II. Click on any year in the menu appearing above to load a page. A Brief History of U.S. Navy Torpedo Development Part 1. Adder Technology Receives Third Queens Award for Enterprise Marine Fenders Supplies Fendering System at US Naval Base in San Diego. Marine Fenders. Dean Richard Kenny collection: Veterans History Project Library of. War: Korean War, 1950 1953 Vietnam War, 1961 1975. Branch: Navy Unit: USS James OHara USS Marine Adder Service Location: Korea also: Vietnam.

USNS MARINE ADDER OUT OF BREMERTON WA: Reunite With.

1953 US SOLDIERS on Troopship USNS Marine Adder Press Photo $25.00. FOR SALE! 1953 US Soldiers on Troopship USNS Marine Adder Press PhotoYou. Today in history, July 29 The Review Alliance, OH. Marine Board of Investigation collision betworn ISS RICHAMK 117 sad tapicor SS WASI! USS ROCHAM IN VAR 803.706 and to the IS WASHINGTON unknova but relative. 15 less. As a result of Adder ved at full left and engine was going. Complete List Veterans History Project Archives State Historical. USNS Marine Adder T AP–193 was a troop ship for the United States Navy in the 1950s. She was built in 1945 for the United States Maritime Commission as.

Naval Defence News & Views Updated Daily Naval Technology.

S.S.MARINE JUMPER 8 29 45 1O 25 45. ALBANESE ANGELO A S.S.SEA ADDER 45 9 45.USS GRUNDY S.S.MARINE EAGLE 1 45 8 45. BARONE. Marine Adder Naval History and Heritage Command. The Distinguished Flying Cross from U.S. Vice President Charles Curtis, left, sit in hospital room of transport Marine Adder that docked in Seattle, Wash. Marine Adder class transport pedia. Another 123 are en route to the U.S. from Shanghai aboard the S.S. Marine Adder, which left the Chinese port on Sept. 7. More than 6.000 of the Jewish.

USNS General MC Meigs T AP 116 - Part II Ibiblio.

Distinguished Flying Cross from U.S. Vice President Charles Curtis, sit in hospital room of transport Marine Adder that docked in Seattle, Следующая Войти. USS RUCHAMKIN, SS WASHINGTON Deputy Commandant for. Marine Adder Class Transport: Laid down, 7 March 1945, as a Maritime Commission type C4 S A3 hull, under a Maritime Commission contract,. 7.13.12 hearing MSJ of Kaiser Ventures granted Pls expert. After the Communist invasion of South Korea, Marine Adder was acquired by the Navy from the Maritime Commission 24 July 1950 and assigned. Mesothelioma from Asbestos Exposure on Navy Ships. Law as well as cases decided under maritime law. the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Various USS Marine Adder, USS Marine Phoenix, and USS.

Pino - logical board game which is based on tactics and strategy. In general this is a remix of chess, checkers and corners. The game develops imagination, concentration, teaches how to solve tasks, plan their own actions and of course to think logically. It does not matter how much pieces you have, the main thing is how they are placement!

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Zoological and natural hazards in Britain

Volcanic eruptions, lightning strikes, lizard bites and hornet stings caused some of the more unusual injuries listed by the Department of Health (DoH).

From the Guardian here :
Accidents cost the NHS about £1bn a year. The most common cause of injury was falling, which led to 119,203 admissions to casualty.

Thousands suffered attacks from a wide variety of animals. These included 451 people stung by hornets, 46 bitten by venomous snakes and lizards, 24 bitten by rats, 15 injured in contact with a marine mammal, two people bitten by centipedes and one attacked by an alligator. But dogs accounted for most injuries with 3,508 people suffering bites.

Hundreds more fell victims to natural hazards, with 54 people struck by lightning, 37 victims of “volcanic eruption” (sic), 25 injured in “cataclysmic storms”, 12 suffered from avalanches and seven were victims of earthquakes. A further 107 were exposed to “unspecified forces of nature”.

Adder bites in the UK

From the NHS (Plus lots of information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of adder bites)

  • Each year, approximately 100 cases of adder bites are reported in the UK. Most bites occur between February and October, with the number of bites peaking during the summer months. Note: I was bitten by an adder in Norfolk in 1972 when I was seven, though it did not inject much venom).
  • Since records began in 1876 there have only been 14 reported deaths caused by adder bites, with the last death a 5-year-old child in 1975.
  • In addition to the adder, it is estimated that there are 75 species of exotic venomous snakes held in the UK, both legally and illegally, by private snake collectors and enthusiasts. These snakes are thought to be responsible for between five to six cases of snake bites in the UK each year. Most cases involve the snake’s owner

Statistically you have more chance of being killed by a wasp than dying at the teeth of Britain’s only venomous snake. The Independent


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