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Children`s Hospital - St. Paul

Children`s Hospital - St. Paul


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Children's Hospital - St. It is one of the two hospitals of Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota - the largest children’s health care organization in the upper Midwest. The hospital is affiliated with the University of Minnesota Medical School at Minneapolis.Since its inception in 1920, the 126-bed free-standing facility has been providing comprehensive and integrated medical and surgical pediatric services to the community.Some of the areas of specialization are cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, hematology/oncology, neurology, and orthopedics.Kohl’s Powercubed Exercise Center, McNeely Pediatric Diabetes Center and Endocrinology Clinic, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit are included in the medical facilities.The Family Resource Center offers library services and information about local hotels and restaurants.In addition, the hospital campus features outdoor play areas, play rooms, family lounges, chapel, and cafeteria.


Children`s Hospital - St. Paul - History

Cystic Fibrosis

At the request of Toby&rsquos pediatrician, Carrie started a thorough log of Toby&rsquos eating. Toby was referred to a gastrointestinal specialist, and that&rsquos when doctors zeroed in on a diagnosis. &ldquoFor confirmation, we were sent to Children&rsquos of Alabama for a sweat test and blood test,&rdquo Carrie said. &ldquoThat&rsquos when we got the official diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.&rdquo

Maggie & Miles Hillman

Cleft Lip and Palate

Before Chris and Leigh Ann Hillman adopted their two children, Maggie and Miles, they knew Children&rsquos of Alabama would play an important role in their lives. In fact, they met with doctors at Children&rsquos Adoption Clinic and Cleft and Craniofacial Center well before the children came home. Maggie and Miles, both born in China, would need multiple surgeries &ndash Maggie for a cleft lip and palate and ear tube placement, and Miles for a cleft palate and ear tube placement.

Vitamins

If your child is a picky eater and you have concerns about whether they are getting enough variety in their diet, Jackson recommends talking to your child&rsquos pediatrician about their nutrition. In this case she says a multi-vitamin may do the trick. Watch video.

For Healthcare Professionals

Children's of Alabama is committed to improving access to and communication with our pediatric providers and community physicians and their staff. This website will be continually updated with the latest forms, directions and contact information to help facilitate the referral process. If you have any concerns or issues, visit the Physician Link and you'll find the phone number to our dedicated team who will be happy to help.

In addition, we will continually update and improve this website with more information about Continuing Medical Education opportunities, research findings, and better access to our providers and staff.

What is the Patient Portal

Children&rsquos of Alabama offers a convenient way to manage your child&rsquos personal medical records with our online patient portal. This portal can be accessed 24/7 from any computer, smartphone, or tablet.
Our Patient Portal features include:

  • Allergy Information
  • Immunizations
  • Lab Results
  • Discharge Instructions
  • Summary of Inpatient Visits
  • Patient Education
  • Personal Health Journal
  • Easy Reference Link to Children&rsquos of Alabama Online Bill Pay System

The patient portal is powered by FollowMyHealth, a leader in secure online access to personal health information. If you need to sign up for a new proxy account, please provide your email address during your registration process.

Contact Us

For general or technical questions about our patient portal, contact our patient portal support team at 205-638-5580 or email [email protected] Representatives will be available to assist you Monday through Friday.

Frequently Asked Questions

FEATURED SERVICES

COVID-19 Resources

In these challenging times, Children&rsquos of Alabama is still serving children safely. The well-being of our patients, families and staff is our utmost priority. Learn more about the hospital&rsquos response to the pandemic and the safety measures in place.

Behavioral Health

Childhood and adolescence can be challenging times, especially when children have problems with mood, paying attention or face difficulties at home or school. If problems are not treated, children can develop low self-esteem, perform poorly at school, have trouble with relationships or struggle to reach their potential.

Understanding Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): What’s Really Going On In the Brain

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Pediatrics West Celebrates 20 Years with Children’s of Alabama

Typical Winter Virus, RSV, Making Appearance in Summer Months

U.S. News & World Report Names Nine Children’s of Alabama Programs to Best Children’s Hospitals List

Auburn City Schools Recognized as "Heart-Safe" School System

Loehr, Mason Promoted at Children's of Alabama

Children’s of Alabama Invites Public to Help Celebrate Hospital’s 110th Birthday

Alabama Poison Information Center Shares Tips for Enjoying the Great Outdoors

Inside Pediatrics Podcast: Safe Sleep Practices for Infants

CHILD OF CHILDREN'S

Toby Ricard

Cystic Fibrosis

At the request of Toby&rsquos pediatrician, Carrie started a thorough log of Toby&rsquos eating. Toby was referred to a gastrointestinal specialist, and that&rsquos when doctors zeroed in on a diagnosis. &ldquoFor confirmation, we were sent to Children&rsquos of Alabama for a sweat test and blood test,&rdquo Carrie said. &ldquoThat&rsquos when we got the official diagnosis of cystic fibrosis.&rdquo

Maggie & Miles Hillman

Cleft Lip and Palate

Before Chris and Leigh Ann Hillman adopted their two children, Maggie and Miles, they knew Children&rsquos of Alabama would play an important role in their lives. In fact, they met with doctors at Children&rsquos Adoption Clinic and Cleft and Craniofacial Center well before the children came home. Maggie and Miles, both born in China, would need multiple surgeries &ndash Maggie for a cleft lip and palate and ear tube placement, and Miles for a cleft palate and ear tube placement.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Vitamins

If your child is a picky eater and you have concerns about whether they are getting enough variety in their diet, Jackson recommends talking to your child&rsquos pediatrician about their nutrition. In this case she says a multi-vitamin may do the trick. Watch video.

FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS

For Healthcare Professionals

Children's of Alabama is committed to improving access to and communication with our pediatric providers and community physicians and their staff. This website will be continually updated with the latest forms, directions and contact information to help facilitate the referral process. If you have any concerns or issues, visit the Physician Link and you'll find the phone number to our dedicated team who will be happy to help.

In addition, we will continually update and improve this website with more information about Continuing Medical Education opportunities, research findings, and better access to our providers and staff.

PATIENT PORTAL

What is the Patient Portal

Children&rsquos of Alabama offers a convenient way to manage your child&rsquos personal medical records with our online patient portal. This portal can be accessed 24/7 from any computer, smartphone, or tablet.
Our Patient Portal features include:

  • Allergy Information
  • Immunizations
  • Lab Results
  • Discharge Instructions
  • Summary of Inpatient Visits
  • Patient Education
  • Personal Health Journal
  • Easy Reference Link to Children&rsquos of Alabama Online Bill Pay System

The patient portal is powered by FollowMyHealth, a leader in secure online access to personal health information. If you need to sign up for a new proxy account, please provide your email address during your registration process.


Anna Herr Clise

Wisconsin-born Anna Herr Clise, her husband James W. Clise and their newborn daughter Ruth arrive in Seattle on June 7, 1889, after James’s sister urges the family to leave their home and prosperous real-estate business in Colorado and join her in Seattle.

The family establishes a new home at the foot of Queen Anne Hill, just 38 years after the 24-member Denny Party – Seattle’s original settlers – landed on the beach at Alki Point in 1851.

James quickly becomes one of Seattle’s leading real-estate developers and financiers. By 1893, Anna and James have added two more children – both boys – to Seattle’s swelling population of 43,000.

Just as hordes of gold prospectors flood Seattle for provisions on their way to the Yukon Territory, tragedy strikes the Clise family when their youngest son, 6-year-old Willis, becomes seriously ill. For all their money and connections, Anna and James are powerless to help Willis, and he succumbs to untreatable inflammatory rheumatism (acute swelling of the body’s joints) on March 19, 1898.


Parmadale

Parmadale Children's Village of St. Vincent de Paul opened its doors in 1925 on State Road in Parma, Ohio. With funding and organizational support from the Catholic Charities Corporation, Parmadale opened with the mission of caring for orphaned boys aged six to sixteen. Parmadale was among the first orphanages to move away from institutional care, implementing a cottage residential plan meant to foster a sense of family.

The campus was designed by architect George S. Rider and built by John Gill & Sons, a construction company notable for their work on the Terminal Tower and Allen Theatre. Initially, the campus consisted of only twelve cottages, but as nearby orphanages consolidated or closed, Parmadale expanded to meet demand. In addition to the cottages, the grounds consisted of a school, gymnasium, pool, dining hall, administrative building, and convent, making it almost unnecessary for the children to leave the grounds unless they were going on a special outing.

The first occupants at Parmadale arrived from the St. Vincent's de Paul and St. Louisville orphanages, which were both closing their doors as Parmadale was being built. St. Vincent's de Paul Orphanage had been established in 1853 by the Sisters of Charity of St. Augustine. The sisters continued their work at Parmadale before its shift to a residential treatment facility, serving as teachers and housemothers.

As local conditions changed, Parmadale's mission evolved and its campus grew. In 1947, Bishop Hoban blessed the opening of additional cottages as Parmadale saw the arrival of the first girls from the closing St. Joseph's Orphanage. Parmadale also took on the care of children from Home of the Holy Family when that institution closed in 1952.

When Parmadale merged with St. Anthony's Home for Boys and Young Men in 1975, the organization was rechristened Parmadale Family Services. With the orphan population in decline by the 1980s, Parmadale began to focus on serving special needs children. To facilitate these changes, new buildings were constructed, including two Intensive Treatment Facilities (built in 1989 and 1994) and the Multi-Purpose Center. In 2009, Parmadale changed yet again, bringing an end to the cottage residential plan and opening the Parmadale Institute, a residential treatment facility intended to treat up to eighty adolescents with behavioral health needs, such as chemical dependency, trauma, severe depression, and other psychological disorders.


Gallery

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 1976 front entrance
Memphis Commercial Appeal, Thomas Busler, Photographer. Courtesy Special Collections University of Memphis Libraries

When Paul R. Williams offered to design the first building for a children&rsquos hospital in Memphis, Tennessee for his friend Danny Thomas, little did they imagine the international role of St. Jude in protecting children&rsquos health. Over seventy years ago Thomas, a young struggling entertainer with no money and little promise, made a pledge to Saint Jude, the patron saint of hopeless causes: &ldquoHelp me find my way in life and I will build you a shrine.&rdquo Soon after making this promise his career began to flourish through films and especially in television. After his professional success in the early 1950s, Thomas discussed with friends and religious advisors the tangible form for his vow. Eventually the idea of a children&rsquos hospital in Memphis took shape.

For over ten years Thomas, along with his wife Rose Marie and business leaders in Memphis raised money to fund the initial hospital building. Thomas&rsquo vision for the hospital was revolutionary for its time. No child would be turned away because they could not pay and the patients and hospital/staff would be totally integrated, an idea unheard of in segregated Memphis. "Black and white patients were treated in the same rooms Black and white parents waited together . Black doctors treated white patients." (From His Promise: A History of ALSAC and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. 1996) The Memphis community embraced Thomas, his family and the hospital&rsquos concept.

In California Danny Thomas met Paul R. Williams, the architect who would later design the entertainer&rsquos family home. Thomas&rsquo vision of creating a center devoted to both researching and curing catastrophic childhood diseases appealed to Williams and the architect offered to donate plans for the first phase of the hospital construction. His architectural design featured a five-pointed star&mdashthe Star of Hope (image 2). When Williams first presented his ideas to Thomas, he was unaware of the importance of the star as a unifying design motif. He did not know that the star had already been identified as the hospital's symbol. "Some people call this nice coincidence," said Danny Thomas at the time. "I call it the hand of God pushing Williams' pencil." Williams would become a board member of the St. Jude Hospital Foundation, the hospital's fund raising group. (St. Petersburg Times, January 31, 1962)

Williams designed St. Jude as a three level central hub with five radiating wings. The first floor and basement of the hub housed a mix of administrative offices and patient/staff support departments. The second floor was used for staff meeting rooms, patient classrooms and a biomedical library. The library, located over the front entrance, featured small outdoor reading areas where scientists and clinicians could relax as they read. Three of the "wings" were dedicated to research with inpatient rooms that could accomodate only 38 children. As the building was near a major earthquake fault, the structure was engineered to "resist Zone 3 earthquake damage, the first building in the city to follow uniform building code."

The hospital was dedicated in 1962 during weeklong celebrations.
On the tenth anniversary of the hospital&rsquos opening (1972) Paul R. Williams was honored at a gala dinner in Memphis (image 3) for his contributions to the hospital. If the architect had returned in 2000, he would not have been able to locate his original hospital building. All but one "ray" of the original Williams&rsquo star had been replaced to make way for a $1 billion expansion, doubling the size of the original campus to 2.5 million square feet of research, clinical, and administrative space.

The Memphis business leaders identified in the 1959 photograph (image 2) holding Paul R. Williams' proposed sketch of St. Jude Children's Hospital are: Claude H. Coyne, John Ford Canale, Dr. B. M. Brady, Frank T. Tobey, Jr., Fred Gattas, and John T. Dwyer.


Note: Adoption record restrictions may apply to all these collections.

Visit the Library

Researchers can search for and locate materials on-site, usually with assistance from Library staff. Photocopy orders may be placed for a fee at the Copy Services window. Please note that restricted or confidential records are often not available the same day they are requested, that researchers may have to formally apply to view these records, and that an application for access does not guaranteed approval. In addition, some restricted records can only be viewed in a redacted form.

For more details on visiting the library, please see our Using the Library guide.

Order Online

The Minnesota Historical Society Library offers a variety of research services.


St. Christopher's Hospital for Children

A leader in pediatric care since 1875, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children's nationally recognized programs and pediatric specialists provide exceptional care to children from throughout the Greater Philadelphia area and around the world. The mission of St. Christopher's Hospital for Children is to provide quality pediatric services in a caring, progressive environment. St. Christopher's Hospital is committed to quality through teamwork, technology and service in a child-friendly, family-oriented environment.

Information on HIPAA Breach Notice provided by St. Christopher's Healthcare, LLC (previous owner of the hospital)

On July 31, 2020, St. Christopher’s Healthcare, LLC, the previous owner of St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, reported a disclosure of protected health information for certain patients that occurred in May, 2019 to the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Civil Rights. Read the notice letter which contains more information on whom to contact with questions.


Rochester State Hospital

Women reading in library, Rochester State Hospital, c.1930.

Rochester State Hospital opened on January 1, 1879, as Minnesota’s second hospital for the insane. It served as part of Minnesota’s state hospital system until 1982, when changing trends in treatment for the mentally ill and lack of funding led to its closure.

Rochester State Hospital began as the Minnesota Inebriate Asylum. In 1873, the state legislature passed a law that imposed a ten-dollar annual tax on liquor dealers to fund the building of an asylum for sufferers of alcoholism, then commonly called inebriates. The state purchased 160 acres of land in Rochester in 1876, and construction of the asylum began in 1877.

Liquor dealers strongly opposed the tax and successfully lobbied against it, arguing that there was a more urgent need for another hospital for the insane. In 1878, the legislature repealed the tax and abolished the inebriate asylum. In its place, they established the Second Minnesota Hospital for the Insane to ease overcrowding at St. Peter, then the state’s only institution for the mentally ill. A portion of the new hospital was dedicated to treating chronic inebriates.

The hospital opened on January 1, 1879, with one hundred male patients transferred from St. Peter. It was built according to the Kirkbride plan, a design created by Dr. Thomas Kirkbride that set aside open stretches of land for farming, exercise, and occupational therapy. The original structure featured a central administration building with wings for patient wards stretching out behind it on either side. The first building was completed in 1880 but was expanded throughout the 1880s. In 1893, the institution changed its name to the Rochester State Hospital.

Treatment of mental illness at the hospital before the 1920s mainly involved keeping patients occupied with work and recreation, and restraining violent patients. Many patients worked on the hospital’s five-hundred-acre farm. Though physical punishment was not prescribed as a treatment, the hospital came under scrutiny in 1889 when patient Taylor Combs died at the hands of two attendants. Following this scandal, Dr. A. F. Kilbourne replaced the hospital’s first superintendent, Dr. J. E. Bowers.

Kilbourne, who served at Rochester until his death in 1935, was a firm believer in therapeutic occupation and amusement for patients as the most valuable forms of treatment. He tried to improve Rochester’s program so that it offered patients more light exposure and more interesting work. After his takeover in 1889, the hospital developed one of the first nurses’ training programs in the country. The first class graduated in 1892.

Treatment methods evolved throughout the hospital’s history. In the late 1940s, insulin and electroshock treatments were common. In the 1950s, lobotomies were used on some patients, and drug use became more extensive. The hospital’s campus continued to change as well. After World War II, there was an influx of geriatric patients. With the old Kirkbride building unable to accommodate them, a major construction program began in 1948. By 1964, newer buildings served most of the patients and the Kirkbride structures were torn down. In 1965, the City of Rochester purchased 212 acres of the hospital’s farm land and turned it into Quarry Hill Park.

By the 1960s, the hospital was known for its surgical unit. It served as a center for many other state institutions, and by 1971 was the only remaining surgical unit in the state hospital system. In the same year, it became the surgical center for the Department of Public Welfare.

In the late 1970s, as the economy declined, the treatment of mental illness moved from state institutions to community-based facilities. In 1981, the Minnesota Legislature ordered Rochester to close as a cost-saving measure, triggering a state-wide controversy. Hospital staff and community members expressed concern that the closure would traumatize patients and damage the local economy. Unlike other state hospitals, which received patients through court orders, Rochester admitted a majority of its patients voluntarily. Patient advocates feared that closing the hospital would hurt those who sought help willingly. Despite these objections, the hospital closed in June 1982.

The Federal Medical Center, a prison for inmates with medical problems, was built on the hospital’s grounds in 1984. The prison used some of the detached hospital buildings but demolished others to allow for new construction.


What if

Glen McGowan remembers when the doctors at Arnold Palmer Medical Center told him in late 2017 his newborn daughter, Ca’terriunna, would need a heart transplant.

He will never forget how one doctor reacted when he said he was transferring her to All Children’s.

“The doctor grabbed me by the arm and he said, ‘Please, don’t take your baby there,’ ” McGowan recalled.

But the family’s Jeep was having problems. All Children’s was an hour closer than the second nearest option. McGowan felt he had no choice.

Ca’terriunna got a transplant, performed by Do and assisted by the veteran Johns Hopkins surgeon who was flying in from Baltimore. She died at All Children’s in June. Medical records show sepsis contributed to her death.

Months later, McGowan stood outside his Avon Park home, clutching two framed photos of Ca’terriunna. His voice got quiet.

“I should have listened to that doctor,” he said.

Photojournalist Eve Edelheit, data reporter Connie Humburg, reporter Divya Kumar, photojournalist Martha Asencio Rhine and news researcher Caryn Baird contributed to this report.

Reach out to us: To tell us about your experiences at the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Heart Institute, email [email protected] or call the Tampa Bay Times investigations team at (727) 892-2944. For more contact options, go to tampabay.com/tips.

Read the full statements

Johns Hopkins All Children’s: Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital is defined by our commitment to patient safety and providing the highest quality care possible to the children and families we serve. An important part of that commitment is a willingness to learn. When we became aware of challenges with our heart institute we took action to address them. We initially reduced the complexity of cases we would cover and brought in a senior visiting surgeon from the flagship Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. We subsequently halted surgeries after that surgeon accepted a position outside of Hopkins. We are currently reviewing the program and recruiting senior surgical talent with the assistance of our colleagues from Johns Hopkins Medicine and will resume surgeries when all involved are confident that the care being delivered meets the high standards set by this organization.

Johns Hopkins Medicine: Johns Hopkins, a not-for-profit health system, is defined by our commitment to providing world-class care for our patients and compassion for the children and families we serve. The safety of our patients is our first priority. When we learned about the issues within the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Heart Institute, we worked with their leadership to make a number of changes, including suspending all open-heart surgeries. We are working closely with Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital to ensure that care for our smallest patients and their families meets Johns Hopkins’ high standards for excellence.


More than 70 years ago, Danny Thomas was a young entertainer with a baby on the way. Work wasn't easy to come by, and his despair grew. He turned to St. Jude Thaddeus, the patron saint of hopeless causes, and vowed:

Show me my way in life, and I will build you a shrine.

That prayer marked a pivotal moment. Soon after, he began finding work, eventually becoming one of the biggest stars of radio, film and television in his day. He was on Make Room for Daddy , later known as The Danny Thomas Show.

Danny used his fame to fulfill his vow and to change the lives of thousands of children and families. In 1962, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital opened in front of a crowd of 9,000 in Memphis, Tenn.


Watch the video: Exeter Hospital: A Tour of Pediatric Surgery (July 2022).


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