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Scroggins DE-799 - History

Scroggins DE-799 - History

Scroggins
(DE-799: dp. 1,400; 1. 306'; b. 37'; dr. 13'6"; s. 23.6 k., cpl. 213, a. 3 3" 4 40mm., 4 1.1", 10 20mm., 2 dct.8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.;; cl. Buckley)

Scroggins was laid down on 4 September 1943 by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex.; launched on 6 November 1943, sponsored by Mrs. Dartha Hardin, sister of Aviation Radioman Scroggins, and commissioned on 30 March 1944, Lt. Comdr. Herbert Kriloff in command.

After shakedown, Scroggins sailed on 1 June 1944 for the first of three convoy voyages from the east coast to Bizerte, Tunisia. On 12 November, after refrsheing from her third voyage to the Mediterranean, Scroggins underwent refresher training at Casco Bay Maine, and then arrived in Argentia, Newfoundland on 18 December for antisubmarine duty. Except for short periods in port and six days of training off New London between 12 and 17 March, she carried out antisubmarine patrols and sweeps in the approaches to Halifax, N.S., as part of a hunter-killer force until 18

April 1945. Between 30 April and 5 May, Scroggins carried out similar patrols off Long Island before proceeding to Norfolk. On V-E day, she was placed on four hours notice in case she was needed to escort surrendered German submarines to United States ports, but did not have to get underway.

Scroggins departed Norfolk on 15 May to screen Guadalcanal (CVE-60) off Jacksonville while the escort carrier qualified pilots for carrier operations. Detached from this duty on 5 June, she then served as a seagoing training ship for the Naval Training Center at Miami, Fla., from 6 June to 17 July. After overhaul at New York and refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, she served as a training ship with submarines at New London from 5 September to 9 December 1945. Between 9 January and 14 February 1946, the escort served as plane guard for Salerno Bay (CVE-110) off Norfolk, and then returned to New London for more submarine training between 26 February and 1 April. The ship arrived at Green Cove Springs, Fla., on 2 May for inactivation; was decommissioned on 15 June 1946, and was placed in reserve there. Scroggins was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1965 and sold on 5 April 1967 to the Peck Iron and Metals Co., Portsmouth, Va., for scrapping.


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If you are interested in participating in the project as an interviewer or interviewee, or have suggestions on possible interviewees, contact the National Archives History Office: [email protected]

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Keep an open mind when searching through Scroggins records. Years ago many people were unable to read and write, thus a given ancestor's name could be spelled in a variety of ways depending on who recorded it. If you want to know How can I find information on men and women named Scroggins who served in the Revolutionary War?, then read this frequently asked question.

Top Five Genealogy Databases to Search for Scroggins

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Scroggins, TX

Scroggins is on Farm Road 115 fifteen miles southeast of Mount Vernon in southeastern Franklin County. Settlement in the area began in the 1850s. The community grew up around a sawmill operated by Milt Scroggins and became a shipping point on the East Line and Red River Railroad, which was constructed through the area in 1877. A post office was established in 1891, and by 1896 the community had a sawmill and three stores. The population was estimated as twenty-five from 1914 through the 1930s. In the 1930s Scroggins had one store and widely scattered houses. During the period after World War II it began to grow. By 1952 it had three rated businesses and an estimated population of eighty. In 1988 Scroggins had four rated businesses and a population estimated at 125. In 1990 and 2000 the population remained at 125. In June 2004 Scroggins General Store owners Ben and Joann Glaze organized the first annual Catalpa Worm Festival as an event to foster community fellowship and celebration. Catalpa trees and their parasites are common in the area.


USS Scroggins (DE-799)

USS Scroggins (DE-799) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, named in honor of Aviation Radioman Second Class Ted H. Scroggins (1918–1942).

Scroggins was laid down on 4 September 1943 by the Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Texas launched on 6 November 1943 sponsored by Mrs. Dartha Hardin, sister of Aviation Radioman Scroggins and commissioned on 30 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander Herbert Kriloff in command.

After shakedown, Scroggins sailed on 1 June 1944 for the first of three convoy voyages from the east coast to Bizerte, Tunisia. On 12 November, after returning from her third voyage to the Mediterranean, Scroggins underwent refresher training at Casco Bay, Maine and then arrived in Argentia, Newfoundland, on 18 December for antisubmarine duty. Except for short periods in port and six days of training off New London, Conn. between 12 and 17 March, she carried out antisubmarine patrols and sweeps in the approaches to Halifax, N.S., as part of a hunter-killer force until 18 April 1945. Between 30 April and 5 May, Scroggins carried out similar patrols off Long Island before proceeding to Norfolk. On V-E day, she was placed on four-hours notice in case she was needed to escort surrendered German submarines to United States ports, but did not have to get underway.

Scroggins departed Norfolk on 15 May to screen Guadalcanal (CVE-60) off Jacksonville while the escort carrier qualified pilots for carrier operations. Detached from this duty on 5 June, she then served as a seagoing training ship for the Naval Training Center at Miami, Fla., from 6 June to 17 July. After overhaul at New York and refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, she served as a training ship with submarines at New London from 5 September to 9 December 1945. Between 9 January and 14 February 1946, the escort served as plane guard for Salerno Bay (CVE-110) off Norfolk, and then returned to New London for more submarine training between 26 February and 1 April. The ship arrived at Green Cove Springs, Fla., on 2 May for inactivation was decommissioned on 15 June 1946 and was placed in reserve there. Scroggins was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1965 and sold on 5 April 1967 to the Peck Iron and Metals Co., Portsmouth, Virginia, for scrapping.


SCROGGINS Genealogy

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B-LINE’s BUILT-IN QUALITY

The Epiphones of the late 50s to mid-60s are high-quality instruments, comparable to the Gibson models in every respect. However, Gibson kept the full sized humbuckers for its own models and often equipped the Epiphones with the mini-humbuckers, which eventually made it into such iconic Gibson designs as the Firebird.

While the Thin-Line Casino model equipped with P-90 pickups was virtually identical to its Gibson counterpart ES-330 in terms of overall appearance, the Solid-bodys obviously emphasized formal independence. Nevertheless, the differences to the corresponding Gibson designs are within a narrow range. An excellent example for the business policy “similar but different” is the Epiphone model Wilshire (introduced in 1959), which Gibson presented as a counterpart to the Les Paul Special.

The 1961 example presented on these pages is in perfect condition with the original components. This is remarkable because for parts like the old P-90 pickups, the ABR-1 bridge and the lightweight aluminum tailpiece (the latter are identical to those of the original Les Paul Standard) alone, you often pay more than for the complete instrument.

The present Wilshire shows immediately what such a ‘Plane Jane’ model is capable of doing electrically. The construction of a mahogany body with a glued-in mahogany neck plus a Rio rosewood fingerboard together with highly sought-after hardware components provides the best acoustic basis for this. The powerful P-90 pickups strikingly translate the guitar’s intense vibrational characteristics into tight and sparkling fresh sounds, which produce wonderfully raw and drizzling electric tones – a real rock beast!

They built only 243 copies of the Epiphone Wilshire’s early version with large 3+3 headstock and Soapbar P-90 pickups. This makes the model one of the rarest Kalamazoo-produced guitars ever. In 1963, the design already received the famous Batwing head, a slightly modified body shape with a protruding horn on top and two mini-humbucker pickups. The early P-90 versions, although played by Hendrix, Townshend and Marriot among others, are not exactly at the forefront of the public’s interest at the moment. Prices on the vintage market occasionally start at $4500, but they can reach twice that amount in the best condition.


یواس‌اس اسکراگینگ (دی‌یی-۷۹۹)

یواس‌اس اسکراگینگ (دی‌یی-۷۹۹) (به انگلیسی: USS Scroggins (DE-799) ) یک کشتی بود. این کشتی در سال ۱۹۴۳ ساخته شد.

یواس‌اس اسکراگینگ (دی‌یی-۷۹۹)
پیشینه
مالک
آب‌اندازی: ۴ سپتامبر ۱۹۴۳
آغاز کار: ۶ نوامبر ۱۹۴۳
اعزام: ۳۰ مارس ۱۹۴۴
مشخصات اصلی

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Buckley (lớp tàu khu trục hộ tống)

Lớp tàu khu trục hộ tống Buckley bao gồm 102 tàu khu trục hộ tống được Hải quân Hoa Kỳ chế tạo vào những năm 1943–1944. Chúng phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Thế giới thứ hai như những tàu hộ tống vận tải và chống tàu ngầm. Chiếc USS Buckley dẫn đầu được hạ thủy ngày 9 tháng 1, 1943. Các con tàu được trang bị động cơ turbine-điện General Electric, từng bộ phận được tiền chế tại nhiều nhà máy khác nhau khắp Hoa Kỳ, rồi được vận chuyển và lắp ghép hàn lại tại xưởng tàu, giúp rút ngắn thời gian chế tạo.

  • Hải quân Hoa Kỳ
  • Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh
  • Hải quân Chile
  • Trung Hoa Dân Quốc
  • Hải quân Quốc gia Colombia
  • Hải quân Ecuador
  • Hải quân Đại Hàn Dân Quốc
  • Hải quân México
  • Hải quân Philippines
  • 1.400 tấn Anh (1.422 t) (tiêu chuẩn)
  • 1.740 tấn Anh (1.768 t) (đầy tải)
  • 9 ft 6 in (2,90 m) (tiêu chuẩn)
  • 11 ft 3 in (3,43 m) (đầy tải)
  • 2 × nồi hơi ống nước Foster-Wheeler kiểu Express "D"
  • 2 × turbine hơi nướcGeneral Electric công suất 13.500 mã lực (10.100 kW), dẫn động hai máy phát điện công suất 9.200 kilôwatt (12.300 hp)
  • 2 × động cơ điện công suất trục 12.000 shp (8,9 MW)
  • 2 × chân vịt ba cánh mangan-đồng nguyên khối đường kính 8 ft 6 in (2,59 m)
  • 3.700 nmi (6.900 km) ở tốc độ 15 kn (28 km/h 17 mph)
  • 6.000 nmi (11.000 km) ở tốc độ 12 kn (22 km/h 14 mph)
    dò tìm mặt biển Kiểu SL trên cột ăn-ten
  • Radar dò tìm không trung Kiểu SA (chỉ trên một số chiếc) Kiểu 128D hay Kiểu 144 trong vòm thu vào được.
  • Ăn-ten định vị MF trước cầu tàu
  • Ăn-ten định vị cao tần Kiểu FH 4 trên đỉnh cột ăn-ten chính
  • 3 × pháo 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal Mk, 22 đa dụng (3×1)
  • 2 × pháo phòng khôngBofors 40 mm (1×2), hoặc 4 × 1,1 inch/75 caliber (1×4)
  • 8 × pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm (6×1)
  • 3 × ống phóng ngư lôi Mark 15 21 inch (533 mm) (1×3)
  • 8 × máy phóng mìn sâu Kiểu K
  • 1 × súng cốichống tàu ngầmHedgehog (24 nòng, 144 quả đạn)
  • 2 × đường ray thả mìn sâu, mang theo cho đến 200 quả

Buckley là lớp tàu khu trục hộ tống thứ hai, tiếp theo sau lớp Evarts. Một trong những khác biệt chính trong thiết kế là lườn tàu được kéo dài hơn đáng kể, một thành công lớn của lớp Buckley nên được tiếp tục áp dụng cho mọi lớp tàu khu trục hộ tống tiếp theo sau. Lớp này còn được gọi là kiểu TE (Turbo Electric), mà sau này được thay bằng cấu hình động cơ diesel-điện trên thiết kế lớp Cannon tiếp nối (DET: Diesel Electric). [1]

Có tổng cộng 154 chiếc được đặt hàng, trong đó 6 chiếc được hoàn tất như những tàu vận chuyển cao tốc ("APD"). Có thêm 37 chiếc được cải biến sau khi hoàn tất cùng 46 chiếc lớp Buckley được chuyển giao cho Hải quân Hoàng gia Anh theo Chương trình Cho thuê-Cho mượn (Lend-Lease). 46 chiếc này được xếp lớp như những tàu frigate và đặt tên theo các hạm trưởng Hải quân Anh thời Chiến tranh Napoleon, hình thành nên một phần của lớp Captain cùng với chiếc Lend-Lease khác thuộc lớp Evarts.

Sau chiến tranh, một số lớn những chiếc còn sống sót được chuyển cho Đài Loan, Hàn Quốc, Chile, Mexico và các nước đồng minh khác. Những chiếc khác được giữ lại trong thành phần dự bị của Hải quân Mỹ cho đến khi được rút đăng bạ và tháo dỡ.


"This is an excellent time to catch big bass. They've been stressed out for the past several weeks and they want to fatten up. As they get schooled up and start feeding aggressively, you can have some ridiculous days on the water."

“Post-spawn bass fishing is definitely a tricky time of year,” Scroggins said. “Once the bass wrap up the spawning process, they want to move to deeper structure as quickly as possible. This leaves anglers in a tough situation—we have to figure out a way to intercept them throughout their migration route. The fish move daily, which makes it extremely important to adapt each and every day you’re on the water.”

In other words—don’t be stubborn to a specific spot or pattern. Even if you caught a lot of nice bass in an area yesterday, those fish can move hundreds of yards overnight and be gone today.

“A lot of folks want to fish the spots that worked last week or even the previous day, but fishing history doesn’t work this time of year,” Scroggins said. “If your best areas don’t produce, always look for the next hard structure closer to deep water such as shell beds, rock piles or stumps and start your search there.”

Don’t overlook steep banks

Many types of bass fishing structure and cover are most productive on a seasonal basis, but Scroggins has found steep banks to offer outstanding fishing opportunities throughout the entire year. In the early summer months as the majority of bass make their annual trek to deeper water, they use these banks for several different reasons.

  • Travel routes—“A steep bank, such as a bluff wall, is almost always indicative of a deep channel swing,” Scroggins said. “Bass are going to use the path of least resistance when coming in and out of spawning pockets and these channels allow them to move quickly and efficiently. So if you can find a tall, vertical bank, you have a great chance of intercepting some hefty post-spawners.”
  • Forage—“When bass are done spawning, their energy levels are depleted,” Scroggins said. “They’ve had a one-track mind for the past several weeks and haven’t been feeding very much. As a result, post-spawners gorge themselves on shad and crawfish which are often found on steep banks. The shad also use the channels as migratory routes and the crawfish love the clay banks and small rocks often found in these areas.”
  • Lowlight conditions—“If you’ve ever been swimming in a lake this time of year, you’ve probably noticed how the water temperature varies depending upon depth,” Scroggins said. “It may be a 90-degree surface temperature but your feet will be in 70-degree water. This makes lowlight conditions critical in these areas—the bass will move up in the water column and feed in the cool water, making them very easy to catch. As the day drags on and it gets warmer, they’ll slide off into deeper water to take advantage of the cooler temperatures.”

Keep your spinning gear nearby

Although finesse fishing has an unfair reputation for catching smaller fish, always make sure you load your spinning gear before you fish for post-spawn bass. Big females often require a period of recovery following the rigors of the spawn, making small, subtle presentations very effective.

“Before post-spawners start focusing on food, they can be fairly inactive for a short period,” Scroggins said. “The loud thump of a big crankbait and the large profile of a jig may not always be what they’re looking for, so don’t be afraid of spinning gear because it catches some really big fish in the early summer. I caught a 9-pound, 12-ounce bass on Toledo Bend a few years ago using 10-pound braid and with a 6-pound leader.”

Now, you probably won’t catch a 9-pounder each time you break out your spinning gear, but these finesse presentations will generate bites when other tactics fail. In a season when bass are constantly on the move, a few extra bites are all that’s needed to start putting together the daily post-spawn puzzle.

A solid dissection system

Time management is no more critical to your bass fishing success than it is right now. Getting out of rhythm and deviating from your game plan for just a few minutes can totally derail and otherwise perfect game plan.

  • First things first—“A lot of people overlook the shad spawn this time of year,” Scroggins said. “You can absolutely load the boat in the first hour of daylight if you time it just right. Throw a white spinnerbait and keep a close eye on it as it comes back to the boat—if you see a bunch of shad following it and ticking the blades, you can rest assured there are bass in an area. It only lasts for the first few hours each day, so target rocks, grass and marina docks early in the morning and you’ll have a great chance of making something happen.”
  • Mid to late morning—“You’re also going to notice a lot of bream beds in the early summer months,” Scroggins said. “These are outstanding places to catch your kicker fish. If you can’t smell them, look in the shallow bays for glowing white spots that look almost like sunken tires. Once you find ‘em, big bass in these areas are suckers for topwater frogs, swim jigs and bream-colored squarebills.”
  • Lunchtime—“After I’ve taken advantage of the shad spawn and nearby bream beds, I’ll start to concentrate my efforts from the secondary points out to the mouths of creeks,” Scroggins said. “This is largely a run-and-gun type of deal. I’m going to hit every secondary I can find and if I don’t have any luck, I’ll start spending more time at the mouths of creeks”
  • Afternoon—“When the sun gets high and the water really starts warming up, I’m going to hit the main channel and spend the rest of the day there,” Scroggins said. “This is where you’ll often find those mega-schools of bass. Focus on any irregularities on the channel ledges—these can be points, turns, doglegs, rocks or even logs. Anything that breaks up the monotony of a ledge will hold bass.”

Beware of the low-hanging fruit

Many of us are drawn to the bank whenever we go bass fishing. The laydowns, visual bank transitions and docks are tough to bypass, but Scroggins makes a concerted effort to steer clear of the distraction. His reasoning makes a lot of sense.

“On any body of water you’ll visit, there will be shallow fish,” Scroggins said. “There’s no doubt about it. But I like to find deep fish because I’m looking for schools—somewhere I can catch 40 bass several days in a row. Shallow fish can help you in the mornings, but try not to get too caught up with them.”

When you find shallow fish in the summer months, they’re more than likely considered “resident” fish, meaning they spend their entire lives in shallow water. They’re not too difficult to catch which can result in a fun day of fishing, but once you catch them—they’re gone. These areas don’t replenish like deep structure does, which can spell trouble for tournament anglers in a multi-day event.

Crank first, drag later

When fishing deep channel ledges later in the day, Scroggins begins by utilizing faster presentations before slowing down to “mop-up” the more lethargic bass with more deliberate techniques.

  • Deep crankbait—“I’m almost always going to start out with a deep crankbait when I’m fishing ledges for post-spawners,” Scroggins said. “For whatever reason, I catch most of my big fish cranking—they have a hard time passing them up. This approach also allows me to cover water quickly and make the less aggressive fish react.”
  • Big worm and football jig—“This is a great backup plan when the fish won’t each a big crankbait,” Scroggins said. “Both of these baits are still bulky and catch big fish, but they’re a little slower which can produce a lot of extra bites.”
  • Drop shot and shaky head—“In a lot of reservoirs, the bass tend to be extremely current-oriented throughout the entire summer,” Scroggins said. “If you’re stuck fishing these ledges on a day with no water movement, don’t get discouraged—instead, rely on your finesse presentations. They will definitely still eat, but you might have to downsize your gear and coerce them into biting.”

Don’t let the finicky nature of post-spawn bass mess with your confidence this summer. If you can spend some extra time on the water and experiment in new places, target steep banks, get comfortable with spinning gear and develop a solid, systematic game plan, you’ll enjoy a lot of success and get a lot of satisfaction from your hard work.


Watch the video: Ausstellung BRUCHSTÜCKE 45 im Haus der Brandenburgisch-Preußischen Geschichte (January 2022).