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Augustus Mausoleum - Largest Circular Tomb On Earth To Reopen In Rome

Augustus Mausoleum - Largest Circular Tomb On Earth To Reopen In Rome

The massive tomb of Augustus, will reopen in March after a 10-million-euro ($12.25 million) project, which includes a virtual reality plug-in and has restored the ancient building to its former glory. Built by Rome’s first emperor, the Augustus tomb is the largest circular tomb in the world.

With Julius Caesar as his great-uncle, Augustus reigned over the empire for four decades from 27 BC. At 35 years old he commissioned the construction of a massive burial tomb on the Campus Martius, at the heart of Rome, Italy. The Mausoleo di Augusto (Mausoleum of Augustus) was built in 28 BC.

The Augustus tomb has received a much needed new lease of life, thanks to a multi-million Euro investment. ( Sovrintendenza Capitolina / Rome Culture)

After the fall of the Roman Empire, the mausoleum became a castle and military look-out. Later it was used as an auditorium for bull fighting and then for operas. However, having deteriorated so badly it had become extremely dangerous and it was closed fourteen years ago. But now, after a 10-million-euro ($12.25 million) restoration project , the ancient tomb will reopen to the public on March 1st 2021.

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Still Standing after 2000 Years of Turmoil

After Augustus’ massive ancient tomb had become a castle and military look-out, Roman elites used it to host lavish parties. According to an article in The Daily Mail it became “a hanging garden and then an auditorium for bullfighting and firework displays.” It was repurposed for concerts and operas before Benito Mussolini , Italian prime minister from 1922 to 43 and the first of 20th-century Europe's fascist dictators, ordered it to be dismantled.

Latterly, nature reclaimed the site and trees began growing through the floors and walls, and the public had treated it as a dumping site for many years. So, fourteen years ago Italian authorities closed it down. Now, after a three-year-long restoration project, and a costly one at that, the massive tomb is set to reopen in March 2021.

After years of misuse, and being taken over by nature, the Augustus tomb was closed to the public more than fourteen years ago. It has now been rehabilitated thanks to a costly investment. (TIMnewsroom / CC BY 2.0 )

Reopening the Largest Circular Tomb Ever Built

Augustus’s mausoleum in Rome is the largest circular tomb in the world. The massive sepulchral structure stands 42 meters (137 feet) high and measures 90 meters (295 feet) in diameter. According to British historian Anthony Everitt in his 2006 book, Augustus: The Life of Rome's First Emperor , in 31 BC Augustus’ forces battled with the armies of Antony at Actium, and the former pursued the later to Alexandria, Egypt. After successfully “dispatching” Antony and Cleopatra , Augustus became the undisputed leader of the Roman Empire, and fittingly, he visited the tomb of another such man: Alexander the Great .

Alexander was thirty-three when he died and Augustus was thirty-three when he ridded himself of Antony, essentially uniting the east with the west. Thus, Alexander's tomb inspired Augustus to build his own grand mausoleum in Rome. Everitt describes the impact this building had on the young Roman. After gazing at Alexander's body for a time, Augustus was asked, “would you now like to visit the Mausoleum of the Ptolemies?” He retorted, “I came to see a king, not a row of corpses.”

Respiritualizing Rome in the Face of Pandemic Fears

A Wanted In Rome article quotes Rome Mayor, Virginia Raggi, as saying that “we need to work for the future and maintain our traditions.” Reopening a monument like this, according to Raggi, “is a signal of hope as we look with good faith towards the future despite the uncertainties of the pandemic.” Italian officials have now confirmed that the site will reopen to tourists on March 1, with free entrance for all until April 21, the day the city marks its founding in 753 BC.

The original Augustus tomb was build in solid marble, that was destroyed and robbed many centuries ago. With the restoration a virtual reality reconstruction at the ancient site will now allow visitors to interact with it as it was 2,000 years ago. At the center of the structure, visitors will see chambers that once held the cremation urns of the Imperial family and Augustus' heirs, and in the very innermost chamber of the ancient mausoleum they will see the sacred spot were the emperor's remains were held, just like Alexander’s.


Mausoleum of Augustus

The Mausoleum of Augustus (Italian: Mausoleo di Augusto) is a large tomb built by the Roman Emperor Augustus in 28 BC on the Campus Martius in Rome, Italy. The mausoleum is located on the Piazza Augusto Imperatore, near the corner with Via di Ripetta as it runs along the Tiber. The grounds cover an area equivalent to a few city blocks nestled between the church of San Carlo al Corso and the Museum of the Ara Pacis. The mausoleum has been restored and reopened to the public in March 2021, after fourteen years of closure. [1] [2] [3]


Description of the Mausoleum

This great tomb is the largest in the Roman world. It was only matched, not bettered by Hadrian&rsquos Mausolem &ndash now on the other side of the Tiber River, the Castel Sant Angelo is open to the public.

Given the poor state of preservation, the original appearance is not known. Some suggest it was a large mound on a 12 metre high foundation that had an external facing of travertine. Others suggest the structure had a stepped profile, facilitated by a series of concentric walls made of concrete, joined to each other by buttresses. The completed circular mausoleum had a diameter of 87 metres and it is thought a height around 42 metres. At the heart of the mausoleum there were a series of chambers, which once held the urns of the Imperial family. The innermost probably held the remains of Augustus himself.

These inner chambers were reached by a narrow corridor from the entrance, on either side of which stood two pink granite obelisks. These were removed and now stand in the Piazza dell&rsquoEsquilino (north west side of the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore) and at the Quirinal fountain.


Mausoleum of Rome’s first emperor Augustus restored, set to reopen. See pics

After decades of neglect, one of ancient Rome’s most important monuments, the mausoleum of the first emperor Augustus, has been restored and will reopen early next year, city officials announced on Friday.

The mausoleum is the largest circular tomb in the world and was constructed in 28 BC near the banks of the river Tiber to house the remains of Augustus and his heirs, including the emperors Tiberius, Caligula and Claudius.

“This is a historic moment,” Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi told reporters, saying the site would open to tourists on March 1, with entrance free for all until April 21, the day the city marks its founding in 753 BC.

“To reopen a monument like this is a signal of hope as we look with good faith towards the future despite the uncertainties of the pandemic. We need to work for the future and maintain our traditions,” she said.

A general view of the mausoleum of Rome's emperor Augustus. (REUTERS)

Once one of the most magnificent buildings in the city, it underwent many changes after the fall of the Roman empire, at one point becoming a fortified castle, then a hanging garden and subsequently an amphitheatre for bullfighting and firework displays.

At the start of the last century it was transformed into a huge theatre for concerts and operas before the fascist dictator Benito Mussolini ordered the dismantling of the auditorium as he sought to restore the landmarks of ancient Rome.

Mausoleum of Rome's emperor Augustus during a preview of the reopening after years of restoration. (REUTERS)

The site fell into disrepair over the years, trees grew from the walls and rubbish filled the pathways.

All that has been cleared and the structure has been made safe thanks to a 10-million-euro ($12.25 million) restoration, partly financed by phone company TIM.

A sculpture of a lion is seen at the mausoleum of Rome's emperor Augustus. (REUTERS)

Augustus helped transform Rome into a world-class city with his infrastructure projects. On his deathbed, he reportedly said: “Marmoream relinquo, quam latericiam accepi” (I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble).

A general view of the mausoleum during a preview of the reopening. (REUTERS)

The original marble cladding that adorned his tomb was plundered centuries ago and a statue that once towered over the building has long vanished, but tourists will get the chance to glimpse its past glories thanks to virtual reality tours.


Rome reopens the Mausoleum of Augustus, the Emperor of Christmas

The Gospel of St. Luke explains that Emperor Augustus ordered a census to be taken, and that is why Mary and Joseph traveled to Bethlehem, where Jesus was born.

Now, just before Christmas, Rome’s city officials announced that this emperor’s tomb will be opened once again.

VIRGINIA RAGGI
Mayor of Rome

“To reopen a monument like this is also a gesture of hope: to look with confidence at a future that is still uncertain because of the developments of the pandemic. We must already work and build for the future because no matter what, we will adapt to change.”

The mausoleum was built in the year 28, as the tomb of Emperor Augustus and his family. Therefore, Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius were also buried here.

At the center, the burial chamber was reconstructed but still retains many original elements. It is the largest circular tomb in the world.

After the fall of the Roman Empire, the building was used for many purposes over the centuries.

MARIA VITTORIA MARINI CLARELLI
Superintendent of Rome

“During the Middle Ages it was a fortress in the Renaissance, an Italian garden, with plants that followed the layout of the mausoleum during the years of the 'grand tour,' it hosted bullfights and fireworks at the beginning of the 20th century it was a concert hall run by Toscanini.”

Workers are racing against the clock because the mausoleum will open to the public on March 1.

As of April, it will feature a virtual reality display in order to show the mausoleum’s original appearance when it was first built.

This is a possible reconstruction.

This is undoubtedly one of the most impressive architectural works in the history of mankind, both then and now.


Mausoleum of Rome's first emperor restored and ready to reopen

ROME (Reuters) - After decades of neglect, one of ancient Rome’s most important monuments, the mausoleum of the first emperor Augustus, has been restored and will reopen early next year, city officials announced on Friday.

The mausoleum is the largest circular tomb in the world and was constructed in 28 BC near the banks of the river Tiber to house the remains of Augustus and his heirs, including the emperors Tiberius, Caligula and Claudius.

“This is an historic moment,” Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi told reporters, saying the site would open to tourists on March 1, with entrance free for all until April 21, the day the city marks its founding in 753 BC.

“To reopen a monument like this is a signal of hope as we look with good faith towards the future despite the uncertainties of the pandemic. We need to work for the future and maintain our traditions,” she said.

Once one of the most magnificent buildings in the city, it underwent many changes after the fall of the Roman empire, at one point becoming a fortified castle, then a hanging garden and subsequently an amphitheatre for bullfighting and firework displays.

At the start of the last century it was transformed into a huge theatre for concerts and operas before the fascist dictator Benito Mussolini ordered the dismantling of the auditorium as he sought to restore the landmarks of ancient Rome.

The site fell into disrepair over the years, trees grew from the walls and rubbish filled the pathways.

All that has been cleared and the structure has been made safe thanks to a 10-million-euro ($12.25 million) restoration, partly financed by phone company TIM.

Augustus helped transform Rome into a world-class city with his infrastructure projects. On his deathbed, he reportedly said: “Marmoream relinquo, quam latericiam accepi” (I found Rome a city of bricks and left it a city of marble).

The original marble cladding that adorned his tomb was plundered centuries ago and a statue that once towered over the building has long vanished, but tourists will get the chance to glimpse its past glories thanks to virtual reality tours.

Reporting by Crispian Balmer and Cristiano Corvino Editing by Janet Lawrence


Contents

The mausoleum was one of the first projects initiated by Augustus in the city of Rome following his victory at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC. The mausoleum was circular in plan, consisting of several concentric rings of earth and brick, faced with travertine on the exterior, and planted with cypresses on the top tier. The whole structure was capped (possibly, as reconstructions are unsure at best) by a conical roof and a huge bronze statue of Augustus.

Vaults held up the roof and opened up the burial spaces below. Twin pink granite obelisks flanked the arched entryway these have been removed one now stands at the Piazza dell'Esquilino (on the north-west side of the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore) and the other at the Quirinal fountain. The completed mausoleum measured 90 m (295 ft) in diameter by 42 m (137 ft) in height.

A corridor ran from the entryway into the heart of the mausoleum, where there was a chamber with three niches to hold the golden urns enshrining the ashes of the Imperial Family. Two pillars flanking the entrance were mounted with bronze plaques inscribed with the Res Gestae Divi Augusti, the document describing Augustus' accomplishments and victories. [4] Surrounding the mausoleum was landscaped parkland akin to modern public parks, affording a place of retreat at the heart of Rome's heavily urbanized Campus Martius.

The Roman poet Martial wrote about the building:

Pour me a double measure, of Falernian, Callistus,

and you Alcimus, melt over it summer snows,

let my sleek hair be soaked with excess of perfume,

my brow be wearied beneath the sewn-on rose.

The Mausoleum tells us to live, that one nearby,

it teaches us that the gods themselves can die. [5]

The traditional story is that in 410, during the sack of Rome by Alaric, the pillaging Visigoths rifled the vaults, stole the urns and scattered the ashes, without damaging the structure of the building. [6] Platner and Ashby, however, posited that "The story of its plundering by Alaric in 410 has no historical foundation, and we know nothing of its destruction". [7]

By the end of the 10th century, the mausoleum had become largely buried under earth and overgrown with trees, to the point where it was referred to as the Mons Augustus. A legend of the time referred to a supposed decree by Augustus who ordered that a basketful of earth from every province of the empire was to be thrown upon his tomb, so that he could rest on the soil of the whole world over which he ruled. Atop the Mausoleum stood a chapel built to the Archangel Michael, while alongside was the Church of Santa Maria (or perhaps Martina) in Augusto (later transformed into San Giacomo degli Incurabili). [8]

By the 12th century, the tumulus was fortified as a castle – as was the mausoleum of Hadrian, which was turned into the Castel Sant'Angelo – and occupied by the Colonna family. After the disastrous defeat of the Commune of Rome at the hands of the Count of Tusculum in 1167, the Colonna were disgraced and banished, and their fortification in the Campo was dismantled. Throughout the Renaissance it passed through the ownership of several major Roman families, who used it as a garden at the beginning of the 19th century it was in use as a circus. [7]

In the early 20th century, the interior of the Mausoleum was used as a concert hall called the Augusteo, [7] until Benito Mussolini ordered it closed in the 1930s and restored it to the status of an archaeological site. The restoration of the Mausoleum of Augustus to a place of prominence featured in Mussolini's ambitious reordering of the city of Rome which strove to connect the aspirations of Italian Fascism with the former glories of the Roman Empire. Mussolini viewed himself especially connected to the achievements of Augustus, seeing himself as a 'reborn Augustus' ready to usher in a new age of Italian dominance.

In January 2017, Italian authorities announced that due to a €6 million grant from Telecom Italia the Mausoleum of Augustus would receive a comprehensive restoration that will allow it to open to the public for the first time since the 1970s. When the Mausoleum opens it will be fully restored and incorporate a multi-media exhibition that will project images of modern and ancient Rome onto the interior walls of the structure. While it was announced in 2017 that the full restoration would be completed by April 2019, the Mausoleum was still not open to the public at the end of 2019. [3]

An earlier intention to restore the Mausoleum in time to commemorate the 2,000th anniversary of Augustus' death in 2014 failed due to funding shortfalls. [9] The neglect of the Mausoleum, closed to the public, overgrown with vegetation and used as a dumping ground for litter, had long attracted criticism, especially after the opening of the Ara Pacis museum across the street in 2006. [2] Following the renovations the press reported that the Mausoleum was due to reopen to the public in the Spring of 2021. [10]

Included among those whose remains were laid inside the mausoleum before the death of Augustus were:


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The original marble that adorned Augustus' tomb was destroyed centuries ago and a statue that once towered the tomb has long vanished, but tourists will get the chance to feast their eyes on the ancient relics in virtual reality tours.

As part of the restoration work engineers carried out structural consolidations that included stabilising the walls and adding iron girders to the vaulted ceilings.

Augustus had the mausoleum built for himself and the imperial family, and it also houses the bones and ashes of Emperors Vespasian, Nero and Tiberius, each indicated with a marble plaque.

The circular structure measures 295 feet in diameter and stands 137 feet high, and is said to have been inspired by the mausoleum of Alexander the Great located in Alexandria, Egypt

The chambers were reached by a narrow corridor that started at the entrance where two large pink granite pillars were once constructed, which now stand in the Piazza dell'Esquilino and at the Quirinal fountain

He was 35 when he had the mausoleum built, shortly after his victory in the naval Battle of Actium, where he defeated the fleets of Antony and Cleopatra.

This resulted in Augustus consolidating his power and making him the undisputed leader of the Roman Empire.

'Augustus built the mausoleum as a way of underlining and reinforcing his rapport with Rome,' historian Tania Renzi told The Telegraph.

'He built a huge bath complex and the Pantheon, but the mausoleum was the biggest project of all. Its dimensions were incredible. Every time an emperor or one of his relatives died, funeral ceremonies were held inside.'

Augustus had the mausoleum built for himself and the imperial family, and it also houses the bones and ashes of Emperors Vespasian, Nero and Tiberius, each indicated with a marble plaque

The original marble that adorned Augusts' tomb was destroyed centuries ago and a statue that once towered the tomb has long vanished, but tourists will get the chance to feast their eyes on the ancient relics in virtual reality tours

As part of the restoration work engineers carried out structural consolidations that included stabilising the walls and adding iron girders to the vaulted ceilings

Augustus was the first Roman emperor and led the transformation from republic to empire after his great-uncle and adoptive father Julius Caesar was murdered.

He was born in 63 BC with the name Octavius and adopted by Caesar in 44 BC.

However, before coming into power in 26 BC the Roman Senate dubbed him the name Augustus which means exalted one, and he reigned for 40 years before dying in 14 AD.

His reported last words were to his subjects: 'I found Rome of clay I leave it to you of marble,' but to the friends who had stayed with him in his rise to power he added, 'Have I played the part well? Then applaud me as I exit.'

The Mausoleum of Augustus is in Rome's historic centre close to the River Tiber and the Vatican City

MAUSOLEUM OF AUGUSTUS: THE LARGEST CIRCULAR FUNERARY MONUMENT IN THE WORLD

The Mausoleum of Augustus was built in 28 BC on the Campus Martius in Rome, dedicated the first first Roman emperor Augustus and his heirs.

It was one of the first projects started by Augustus int he city of Rome and was circular in plan with a number of concentric rings of brick and earth.

It featured two pink granite obelisks that flanked the arched entrance and it measured 295ft in diameter by 137ft high.

During the sack of Rome by the Visigoths in 410 it is thought they stole the urns and scattered the ashes, but left the structure of the building intact.

It has been through a number of different uses over the course of its long 2,000 year history including as a theatre, concert venue and bullfighting ring.

In the early 20th century it was turned into a concert hall called Augusteo until it was ordered closed by dictator Mussolini in the 1930s.

He wanted it restored as an archaeological site, as part of a wider mission to restore ancient Roman monuments throughout the city of Rome.

A restoration project started in 2017 including a $8 million donation from the telecom firm Telecom Italia and money from the government.

It reopened to the public in March 2021 after nearly two decades closed due to the state of disrepair.


He was the first Roman emperor who took over from Julius Caesar and established an empire that would eventually spread from the United Kingdom to Egypt, boasting that “I found Rome built of bricks and left it marble” on his dying mattress.

But when Emperor Augustus died in 14CE, he didn’t exactly obtain a commission courteously. For hundreds of years, his tomb, an enormous circular mausoleum that was the largest in the metropolis when it was completed, was abandoned.

It has long been a far cry from the fastidiously preserved Colosseum and Roman Forum with its roof dropped in and the cypresses planted around it left to develop wild.

In reality, for a lot of the previous 80 years, it has been closed to the public, with transient openings in the yr 2000 to rejoice the metropolis’s Jubilee yr, after which once more, earlier than being closed in 2007 for archaeological investigations.

It was hoped that it will reopen in 2014, to mark 2,000 years since Augustus died. In the finish, although, with conservation work nonetheless ongoing, it was opened on the day itself.

But lastly, a 13-year restoration has come to an finish, and it’s due to be opened to the public in March 2021.

A full scale renovation

After many years of disrepair, it would open once more to the public.

The restorations, accomplished in two levels, have price over €10 million ($12 million). Stage one, funded partly by the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities, and the Roman authorities, was accomplished in 2019. It oversaw the restoration of the monument.

Stage two, funded by the Fondazione TIM, the social arm of Telecom Italia, to the tune of €6 million ($7,300,000), has targeting the inside areas, and setting it up for excursions.

Huge structural works to shield the mausoleum have been undertaken, and a spiral staircase that leads to the roof of the monument, has been reconstructed.

The Fondazione TIM has additionally funded the restoration of the burial area, and the landscaping round the mausoleum.

Even the sq. exterior, the Piazza Augusto Imperatore, is being refurbished. Until now, the mausoleum has been one thing of a roundabout, with vehicles parked up throughout it. The works are due to end in December 2021.

Grand neighbors

The mausoleum was initially as massive as the Pincian hill.

It’s not the first facelift for the archaeological stays in the space. Nearby is the Ara Pacis — a grand, ceremonial altar constructed to rejoice Augustus’ return from his campaigns in Gaul and Spain in 13BCE, with intricate sculptures of the imperial household that includes as a part of a procession.

In 2006, the outdated pavilion round it was changed by a glass and metal construction by architect Richard Meier, which is extra of a murals in itself. The altar is now seen from the river Tiber, with the mausoleum behind it.

Augustus had nice plans for his tomb. The emperor — who was born in 63BCE, and took energy in 14CE — had work began on it in 28BCE, after his victory over Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium, again when “Augustus” was merely Octavian — his title earlier than he turned emperor.

A gargantuan, marble-sheathed tomb

The interiors had been severely broken over the centuries.

Built for him and his household, it’s the greatest circular tomb in the ancient world, with a diameter of just about 90 meters and a peak of no less than 45 meters, from what might be surmised from the stays. Only a 3rd of the unique monument has survived.

Its gargantuan measurement made it virtually as massive as the close by Pincian hill, and it was located by the Tiber in order to be seen from most of the metropolis.

Although in the present day it seems fabricated from brick, initially, these partitions have been coated in travertine marble, of which solely traces stay in the present day.

It is assumed to have served as a tomb for greater than 100 years, earlier than data have been misplaced. It was subsequent talked about in the tenth century.

From a fortress to an amphitheater

The mausoleum seen in 1963, with the Tiber past it.

In the medieval interval, a fortress was constructed on high of the stays, however was destroyed in 1241. Following that, the construction was step by step dismantled, with the marble being eliminated to use as constructing matierials.

In the sixteenth century, the homeowners of a palazzo close by turned the inside of the tomb right into a backyard. By the 1780s it was getting used as an amphitheater, with bullfighting and jousting on show. In the nineteenth century it was coated by a glass dome and used for theater reveals by the twentieth century it was getting used as a live performance corridor, the Auditorium Augusteo.

Only in 1936 did its new life come to an finish, when the fascist regime — which was intent on excavating and preserving the metropolis’s heritage, in a bid to align itself with ancient Rome — demolished the cupola and the trendy buildings, to unveil the tomb as soon as extra.

Restoration work was halted throughout World War II, and began up once more in the Nineteen Fifties.


Mausoleum of Augustus to Reopen in Rome

One of the most important monuments of Ancient Rome, the Mausoleum of Augustus, will reopen to the public in 2021.

The Mausoleum of Augustus, the burial place of Rome’s first emperor, is set to reopen to the public in 2021 after years of restoration work on the neglected site.

“To reopen a monument like this is a signal of hope,” said Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi when she announced the news. “We need to work for the future and maintain our traditions.”

The Mausoleum of Augustus will open on March 1, 2021, with free admission (via timed tickets) for all visitors until April 21, Rome’s birthday. The site was originally set to reopen in spring 2020 but that was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic.

Construction on the Mausoleum of Augustus began in 28 B.C., one of the emperor’s first major building projects in the city. According to contemporary historian Strabo of Amasia, the mausoleum was “one of the most remarkable monuments in Rome.”

At 87 meters in diameter, the tomb is the largest of its kind in the world — even larger than Hadrian’s tomb which forms the foundation of the Castel Sant’Angelo on the other side of the Tiber River.

Originally clad in travertine marble, the Mausoleum of Augustus was planted with cypress trees along its top tier and capped with a bronze statue of Augustus. The tomb also featured two granite obelisks at its entrance which were long ago transferred to the Esquiline and Quirinal Hills to decorate their respective squares.

Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome / Photo via Sovrintendenza Roma

Caesar Augustus died on 19 August 14 A.D. But he was not the only one to have his ashes buried in the mausoleum. It also contains the “ashes of the emperors of the Julio-Claudia dynasty, with the exception of Nero, and their family members, with the exclusion of Julia, Augustus’ only natural daughter.”

The remains of five members of Augustus’ family, including his adopted grandsons, were buried in the tomb prior to the death of Augustus. After his death, the ashes of emperors Tiberius, Caligula, and Claudius, among others, were all interred in the tomb.

The official website of the Mausoleum of Augustus tracks the timeline of the mausoleum, from its time as an Ancient Roman burial ground to today.

In the years in between, the mausoleum served as a fortified castle (12th century) to a bullfighting amphitheater (18th century) to an auditorium known as the Augusteo in the early 20th century. Seeking to restore the mausoleum as an archeological site and claim the area for his own monumental tomb, Mussolini closed the Augusteo in 1936.

The Mausoleum of Augustus is located in Rome’s Campo Marzio (Campus Martius) neighborhood near the Ara Pacis Augustae, where you can read view the Res Gestae, the engraved autobiography of Augustus. Like the Ara Pacis, the mausoleum will offer visitors the opportunity to view the site using virtual reality headsets.


Watch the video: Ara Pacis Augustae, Rome (November 2021).