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This Day in History: 11/02/1947 - Spruce Goose Flies

This Day in History: 11/02/1947 - Spruce Goose Flies

On This Day in History, November 2, Harry Truman defeated Thomas E. This was a surprise to the Chicago Tribune whose front page the night before had declared Dewey as the winner. On November 1, 1983 Martin Luther King's birthday was made into a national holiday. It is still the only national holiday to honor a single American. On November 2, 2000, the first multi-national space crew reached its destination of the International Space Station. Lastly, on November 2, 1947, Howard Hughes flew his Spruce Goose. This was the largest aircraft ever built, and it was more like a flying boat. However, Hughes proved his critics wrong as he flew the craft for one mile. This was the first and only flight of the Spruce Goose.


Famous Birthdays

    Rolando Garbey, Cuban light middleweight boxer (Olympic silver 1968 World C'ship gold 1974), born in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba

Jim Steinman

Nov 1 Jim Steinman, American Grammy Award-winning songwriter and record producer (Bat Out of Hell, Total Eclipse of the Heart), born in NYC, New York (d. 2021)

    Bob Weston, English, guitarist and songwriter (Fleetwood Mac), born in Devon (d. 2012) Ted Hendricks, American College and Pro Football Hall of Fame linebacker (8 x Pro Bowl Super Bowl 1971, 76, 80, 84), born in Guatemala City, Guatemala Dave Pegg, British pop bassist (Jethro Tull-Crest of a Nave), born in Birmingham, England David Anthony Ahern, Australian composer, born in Sydney Hilary Tann, Welsh composer (Shakkei), and educator (Union College, 1980-present), born in Llwynypia, Glamorgan, Wales Mazie Hirono, American politician Joseph "Joe" Lala, American musician, actor and singer notable for co-founding the rock band "Blues Image", born in Ybor City, Florida (d. 2014) Alexei Ulanov, Russian pairs figure skater (Olympic gold [with Irina Rodnina] 1972), born in Moscow, Russia Rod Marsh, Australian cricket wicket-keeper (96 Tests, 355 dismissals Australian selector), born in Perth, Western Australia Oļegs Antropovs, Latvian volleyball player (Olympic gold 1968), born in Shymkent, Kazakh SSR Peter Noone, English rock singer, sometimes known as "Herman" (Herman's Hermits - "I'm Into Something Good" "Mrs. Brown, You've Got A Lovely Daughter"), born in Davyhulme, Lancashire, England Edward Yang, Taiwanese film director (Yi Yi), born in Shanghai, China (d. 2007) Larry James, American track athlete, 4X400m relayer (Olympic gold 1968), born in Mount Pleasant, New York (d. 2008) Jack Arnold, character on TV programme The Wonder Years Jim Rosenthal, English sports presenter, born in Oxford, England Bob Anderson, English darts player (BDO World Champion 1988), born in Winchester, Hampshire, England Yutaka Fukumoto, Japanese professional baseball player, born in Osaka, Japan Margaret Rhea Seddon, American physician and NASA astronaut (STS 51D, 40, SK:58), born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee Minnie Ripperton, American singer (Loving You), born in Chicago, Illinois Robert David Hall, American actor (Dr. Albert Robbins M.D, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation), born in East Orange, New Jersey Bechir Gemayel, President-elect of Lebanon (8/23-9/14, 1982), born in Achrafieh, Beirut, Lebanon (d. 1982) Greg Lake, English rock vocalist and bassist (King Crimson, Emerson, Lake & Palmer), born in Bournemouth (d. 2016) Glen Buxton, American guitarist (Alice Cooper) and composer, born in Akron, Ohio (d. 1997) Brad Lee Sexton, American bass guitarist (Little Charlie and the Night Cats), born in North Carolina (d. 1995) Callum Alexander MacDonald, Scottish historian, born in Eaglesham, Renfrewshire (d. 1997) Pat "Dirty" Daugherty, American rocker (Black Oak Arkansas) Donald Roeser, rock guitarist/vocalist (Blue Oyster Cult) J. C. [John Charles] Crowley, American musician, born in Houston, Texas Patrice Leconte, director (Monsieur Hire, Hairdresser's Husband) Ron Bryant, American baseball player Joe Mantegna, American actor (House of Games, Weeds), born in Chicago, Illinois Gene Garber, American baseball player, born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania Toy Caldwell, American Southern-rock musician (Marshall Tucker Band), born in Spartanburg, South Carolina (d. 1993)

P. J. O'Rourke

Nov 14 P. J. O'Rourke, American journalist and satirist (Parliament of Whores, Easy Money), born in Toledo, Ohio

    Buckwheat Zydeco [Stanley Dural, Jr.], American B-3 organist, accordionist and singer (Where There's Smoke, There's Fire), born in Lafayette, Louisiana (d. 2016) William B Richardson, (Rep-D-New Mexico, 1983- ) Ebby Thust, German boxing promoter and writer, born in Frankfurt-Sossenheim, Germany Rod Clements, English rocker (Lindisfarne), born in North Shields, Tyne and Wear Stewkey [Robert Antoni], rocker Steven E. de Souza, American scriptwriter and producer (Die Hard, Commando), born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Inky Mark, Canadian politician Jameson Parker, actor (American Justice, Simon & Simon), born in Baltimore, Maryland Michael Carabello, American percussionist and songwriter (Santana, 1968-71), born in San Francisco, California Bob Boone, baseball player and manager (Phillies, Angels), born in San Diego, California Julian Graham Theodore Hough, actor (Deathwatch, Jabberwocky) Lamar Smith, American politician (Rep-R-Texas 1987-2019), born in San Antonio, Texas Joe Walsh, American guitarist ("Life's Been Good" "Rocky Mountain Way" Eagles - "In The City"), born in Wichita, Kansas Alfredo Cristiani, president of El Salvador (1989-94) Rod Price, British rock and blues guitar and slide guitar player (Foghat - "Slow Ride"), born in 1947 Willesden, North London, England (d. 2005) Valerie Wilson Wesley, American author Rod "The Bottle" Price, British electric and slide guitarist (Foghat - "Slow Ride"), born in Willesden, North London, England (d. 2005) Geoffery Michael Roberts, vintner Dwight Schultz, American actor (A-Team - "Murdock" Star Trek: The Next Generation - "Barclay"), born in Baltimore, Maryland Dave Sinclair, British progressive rock keyboard player (Caravan - In the Land of Grey and Pink), born in Herne Bay, Kent, England Tracey Walter, American character actor (Repo Man Best of the West), born in Jersey City, New Jersey John Larroquette, actor (Dan Fielding-Night Court), born in New Orleans, Louisiana Jonathan Kaplan, French film director (Heart Like a Wheel), born in Paris, France Linda Laflamme, rocker Val Fuentes, rocker (It's A Beautiful Day) Larry Gura, American MLB baseball player, born in Joliet, Illinois Richie Hebner, American baseball player, born in Norwood, Massachusetts Susanne Zenor, American actress (Days of Our Lives), born in Louisville, Kentucky Michel Berger [Hamburger], French pop singer and songwriter, born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France (d. 1992) Maria Farantouri, Greek folk and jazz singer, born in Athens Michel Berger, French singer & songwriter, born in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France (d. 1992) Petra Kelly, Gunzburg, Bavaria, German politician and activist (German Green Party) Ronnie Montrose, American rock guitarist (Montrose, Gamma), born in Denver, Colorado (d. 2012) Clare H. Torry, British session singer (Pink Floyd - "The Great Gig in the Sky"), born in Marylebone, London

David Mamet

Nov 30 David Mamet, American playwright (Speed the Plow, House of Games), born in Chicago, Illinois


Famous Deaths In 1947

Famous People Died In This Year In History

Jan 04 In the year 1947 forrest Reid, Irish author/critic (Young Tom, Apostate), dies at 71

Jan 09 In the year 1947 karl Mannheim, sociologist (Diagnosis of Our Time), dies at 53

Jan 11 On this day in history death of eva Tanguay, Canadian-born singer and entertainer (b. 1879)

Jan 12 Jonas Cohn, German/English philosopher (Wertwissenschaft), dies at 77 on this day in history.

Jan 13 In the year 1947 veit Valentin, German/US historian (German People), dies at 61

Jan 15 On this day in history death of elizabeth Short, the Black Dahlia (b. 1924)

Jan 17 Pyotr Krasnov, Russian counter-revolutionary (b. 1869) died on this day in history.

Jan 20 In the year 1947 josh Gibson, Negro League slugger, dies of a brain tumor at age 35


Perspectives

On this day in 1517, the priest and scholar Martin Luther approaches the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany, and nails a piece of paper to it containing the 95 revolutionary opinions that would begin the Protestant Reformation.

In his theses, Luther condemned the excesses and corruption of the Roman Catholic Church, especially the papal practice of asking payment—called “indulgences”—for the forgiveness of sins. At the time, a Dominican priest named Johann Tetzel, commissioned by the Archbishop of Mainz and Pope Leo X, was in the midst of a major fundraising campaign in Germany to finance the renovation of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Though Prince Frederick III the Wise had banned the sale of indulgences in Wittenberg, many church members traveled to purchase them. When they returned, they showed the pardons they had bought to Luther, claiming they no longer had to repent for their sins.
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Nov 02, 2018 #25 2018-11-02T10:23

1947 Spruce Goose flies

H-4 a reality. Because of wartime restrictions on steel, Hughes decided to build his aircraft out of wood laminated with plastic and covered with fabric. Although it was constructed mainly of birch, the use of spruce (along with its white-gray color) would later earn the aircraft the nickname Spruce Goose. It had a wingspan of 320 feet and was powered by eight giant propeller engines.

Development of the Spruce Goose cost a phenomenal $23 million and took so long that the war had ended by the time of its completion in 1946. The aircraft had many detractors, and Congress demanded that Hughes prove the plane airworthy. On November 2, 1947, Hughes obliged, taking the H-4 prototype out into Long Beach Harbor, CA for an unannounced flight test. Thousands of onlookers had come to watch the aircraft taxi on the water and were surprised when Hughes lifted his wooden behemoth 70 feet above the water and flew for a mile before landing.

Despite its successful maiden flight, the Spruce Goose never went into production, primarily because critics alleged that its wooden framework was insufficient to support its weight during long flights. Nevertheless, Howard Hughes, who became increasingly eccentric and withdrawn after 1950, refused to neglect what he saw as his greatest achievement in the aviation field. From 1947 until his death in 1976, he kept the Spruce Goose prototype ready for flight in an enormous, climate-controlled hangar at a cost of $1 million per year. Today, the Spruce Goose is housed at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville, Oregon.


This Day in History for November 2

1852 – Franklin Pierce elected as President of US.

1867 – Women’s fashion magazine “Harper’s Bazaar” is 1st published.

1889 – North Dakota becomes 39th & South Dakota becomes 40th state in the United States.

1907 – US banker J.P. Morgan locks over 40 bankers in his library to force them to find ways to avert New York banking crisis.

1920 – Warren G. Harding is elected President of the United States, defeating Democrat candidate James M. Cox.

1947 – Howard Hughes flies “Spruce Goose”, a huge wooden airplane for the first and last time.

1948 – US President Harry Truman is re-elected in an upset victory over Republican candidate Thomas E. Dewey.

1950 – The Clover Dairy Company test-market the first concentrated milk (Sealtest) in the U.S. in Wilmington, Delaware.

1954 – Charles Diggs,Jr. is elected Michigan’s 1st black congressman to the House of Representatives.

1954 – Strom Thurmond is the 1st US senator elected by write-in vote (South Carolina)

1959 – Charles Van Doren confesses that TV quiz show “Twenty One” was rigged.

1960 – Penguin Books cleared of obscenity for publishing DH Lawrence’s “Lady Chatterley’s Lover”

1976 – Democrat candidate Jimmy Carter is elected President of the United States, defeating incumbent Republican President Gerald Ford.

1983 – US President Ronald Reagan signs bill establishing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.

1984 – Velma Barfield (NC) becomes the first female executed in the United States since 1952.

1988 – The Morris worm, first internet-distributed computer worm to gain mainstream media attention launched from MIT, strikes Pentagon, SDI research lab & 6 universities.

1993 – Rudy Giuliani wins the New York mayoral election, becomes 1st Republican mayor since 1965.

2012 – New York City Marathon cancelled because of the effects of Hurricane Sandy in NYC the week before.

2017 – Jerome Powell nominated by US President Donald Trump to be next Chair of the Federal Reserve.


This Day in History: 11/02/1947 - Spruce Goose Flies - HISTORY

Today in 1947, the Hughes H-4 Hercules made its one and only flight off Long Beach, California for a distance of one mile and a maximum height of 70 feet. The man at the controls was Howard Hughes, the eccentric millionaire who had seen this plane, dubbed by the press the Spruce Goose, grow from a wartime drawing board fantasy all the way to a flying modern marvel.

The story of the Spruce Goose begins in early 1942, several months after the United States entered the Second World War. The convoys carrying precious cargo to the Allies in Europe were being decimated by German U-boats. If Britain and Russia could not be supplied from the Arsenal of Democracy, it was doubtful that they would remain in the war. The only solution open to the war planners in Washington was to build a plane large enough to act as a replacement for the cargo ships of the era.

It was Henry J. Kaiser, the man who built the Liberty ships, who first approached Howard Hughes about building a gigantic flying boat. But Kaiser knew almost nothing about the aircraft industry and soon turned the entire project over to Hughes. Almost every metal used in manufacturing was in short supply during the early years of the war, so the Hughes design team drew up plans for an aircraft made largely of laminated birch, not spruce. It would hold 700 troops and have a range of 3000 miles. It would be able to take off and land from any calm body of water.

The H-4, on display today at The Evergreen Aviation Museum in Oregon, is a monster. At 319 feet, her wingspan is the largest of any aircraft built to this day. She is nearly 220 feel long and stands 80 feet high at her tail. She is pulled through the air by 8 Pratt & Whitney engines, each capable of production 3,000 horsepower. Even by today’s standards, she is an aviation masterpiece.

The Spruce Goose was not completed in time for using during the war. In fact, the construction ran so far over on time that Hughes was called to testify before the US Senate War Investigation Committee to explain his usage of the government funds for some of the aircraft’s development costs. The committee was far from friendly to Hughes, who was already starting to display many of the obsessive traits that would plague him for the rest of his life. During a break in the testimony, Hughes flew back to California. He had a point to prove.

And so it was the Howard Hughes ended up at the controls of his airplane on November 2, 1947. The event was only supposed to be for engine tests, but as the speed of the craft increased, it became clear that the Spruce Goose was going to fly. Although the flight was short and some critics said that the plane was using ground effect and was too underpowered to fly any higher, Hughes had disproved those in the Senate who were claiming that the plane could not fly at all.

The H-4 was never put into production and never flew again after that day. Until his death in 1976, Hughes paid to have the plane kept in a climate-controlled hangar and ready for flight. The US Navy nearly flew the plane in 1977 as part of a program to study low level heavy lift aircraft, but the project was cancelled. The Spruce Goose will probably never fly again, but it will always remain as a testament to one man’s vision and determination.


Hughes H-4 Hercules

The Hughes H-4 Hercules (commonly known as the Spruce Goose registration NX37602) is a prototype strategic airlift flying boat designed and built by the Hughes Aircraft Company. Intended as a transatlantic flight transport for use during World War II, it was not completed in time to be used in the war. The aircraft made only one brief flight, on November 2, 1947, and the project never advanced beyond the single example produced.

H-4 Hercules
Role Heavy transport flying boat
National origin United States
Manufacturer Hughes Aircraft
First flight November 2, 1947
Status On display
Produced 1947
Number built 1
Career
Other name(s) Spruce Goose
Registration NX37602
Flights 1
Preserved at Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum

Built from wood (Duramold process) because of wartime restrictions on the use of aluminum and concerns about weight, the aircraft was nicknamed the Spruce Goose by critics, although it was made almost entirely of birch. [1] [2] The Hercules is the largest flying boat ever built, and it had the largest wingspan of any aircraft that had ever flown until the Scaled Composites Stratolaunch first flew on April 13, 2019. [3] [4] The aircraft remains in good condition. After having been displayed to the public in Long Beach, California, from 1980 to 1991, it is now on display at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum in McMinnville, Oregon, United States. [5]


This Day in History for November 2

1867 – Women’s fashion magazine “Harpers Bazaar” is 1st published.

1889 – North Dakota becomes 39th & South Dakota becomes 40th state in the United States.

1907 – US banker J.P. Morgan locks over 40 bankers in his library to force them to find ways to avert New York banking crisis.

1920 – Warren G. Harding is elected President of the United States, defeating Democrat candidate James M. Cox.

1934 – MLB All-Star team lead by Connie Mack and including Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx and Lou Gehrig starts 18-game tour against Japanese Big-Six University League.

1944 – US 28th Infantry division opens assault on Schmidt Hurtgenwald.

1947 – Ryder Cup Golf, Portland GC: US wins first post WWII event, 11-1 Ben Hogan American captain Henry Cotton GB skipper.

1947 – Howard Hughes flies “Spruce Goose”, a huge wooden airplane for the first and last time.

1948 – US President Harry Truman is re-elected in an upset victory over Republican candidate Thomas E. Dewey.

1950 – The Clover Dairy Company test-market the first concentrated milk (Sealtest) in the U.S. in Wilmington, Delaware.

1954 – Strom Thurmond is the 1st senator elected by write-in vote (South Carolina)

1960 – New York Yankee outfielder Roger Maris beats teammate Mickey Mantle for American League MVP Award, 225-222 second closest vote ever.

1969 – Quarterbacks Billy Kilmer of New Orleans and St. Louis’ Charlie Johnson each pass for 6 touchdowns for combined NFL record 12 passing TDs in a game Saints beat Cardinals, 51-42 at Busch Memorial Stadium.

1976 – Democrat candidate Jimmy Carter is elected President of the United States, defeating incumbent Republican President Gerald Ford.

1983 – US President Ronald Reagan signs bill establishing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.

1984 – Velma Barfield becomes the first woman executed in the United States since 1962.

1991 – Nevada makes biggest comeback in NCAA football history, overcoming a 35 point 3rd quarter deficit to rally and beat Weber State, 55-49.

1994 – NFL announces the expansion Carolina Panthers would play in the NFC West, while the Jacksonville Jaguars is assigned to the AFC Central.

2004 – George W. Bush is re-elected as President of the United States, defeating Democrat candidate John Kerry.

2012 – New York City Marathon: cancelled because of the effects of Hurricane Sandy in NYC the week before.

2017 – Jerome Powell nominated by US President Donald Trump to be next Chair of the Federal Reserve.


Watch the video: September 16 - This Day in History (January 2022).