History Podcasts

Audrain- APA-59 - History

Audrain- APA-59 - History

Audrain

A county in Missouri.

(APA-59: dp. 7,000; 1. 426'; b. 58'; dr. 16'; s. 16.9 k.; cpl. 849; a. 15", 8 40mm., 10 20mm.; cl. Gilliam; T. S4-SE2-BD1)

Audrain (APA-59) was laid down on 1 December 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1852) at Wilmington, Calif, by the Consolidated Steel Corp.; launched on 21 April 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Arthur G. Rystrom; acquired by the Navy on 1 September 1944; and placed in commission at San Pedro, Calif., on 2 September 1944, Lt. Comdr. George 0. Forrest in command.

The newly commissioned transport held shakedown training off the southern California coast. In late October, she sailed to San Francisco, Calif., and took on passengers and cargo. On the 21st, Audrain got underway for Manus, Admiralty Islands. While en route, the ship developed leaks in the tubes of one boiler and, upon ' her arrival at Manus on 9 November, began a period of repair work. The transport then proceeded to Noumea, New Caledonia, to embark Army troops for training exercises in reparation for landings on Luzon, Philippine Islands. During Member, she held exercises off Noumea as well as at Guadalca- and Tulagi, Solomon Islands.

Audrain got underway on 2 January 1945 with Task Group (TG) 77.9 with troops embarked for the assault on Luzon. She anchored in the transport area in Lingayen Gulf on the morning of 9 January and landed her troops without opposition. The unloading was completed by the evening of the 12th, and the transport retired with her task unit to Le te, Philippine Islands. On the 18th, Audrain shaped a course for Biak, Schouten Islands. There, she took on troops and equipment for transportation to Mindoro, Philippine Islands. She discharged these passengers and their gear on secured beaches in the San Jose area of Mindoro on 9 February and retired to Leyte Gulf.

During the next several weeks, Audrain was involved in exercises in Philippine waters. On 27 March, the vessel training got underway with TG- 55 1 for the invasion of Okinawa. She
arrived off th that Island on 55.1 day, 1 April, began lowering her boats, and sent them to other transports to assist in landing their assault troops. On the morning of the 3d, Audrain began
landing her troops and cargo in the Hagushi area.

She experienced several air attacks while in the area. On 6 June, Audrain opened fire on a lone Japanese "Val" but scored no hits. However, two 40-millimeter projectiles fired by neighboring vessels hit her on the forward bulkhead of the navigation bridge, slightly wounding three members of her crew. The landings were completed on 9 April, and the vessel left the Okinawa area bound for Hawaii. The ship paused at Guam on the 14th to transfer casualties from Okinawa to hospitals ashore, and then she continued on to Pearl Harbor.

Audrain arrived there on 1 May and underwent a 10-day period of voyage repairs. She then sailed on to San Francisco, arriving there on 18 May. The ship entered the yards of Hurle Marine Works, Oakland, Calif., for repairs and alterations. Af- ter leaving the yard, the ship took on passengers and cargo for transportation to forward areas. She got underway for Fear] Harbor on 31 May. Following a brief layover in that port, Audrain shaped a course for Leyte. She made stops en route at Eniwetok and Ulithi before arriving at Leyte on 30 June.

The ship discharged her cargo ashore and embarked Navy passengers bound for the United States. She shaped a course back to the west coast via Pearl Harbor and reached San Francisco on the 29th. After discharging her passengers, the transport returned to Hurley Marine Works to undergo repairs and alterations. While she was in the yard, the Japanese capitulated on 15 August. The ship returned to duty on 18 August and got underway for Guam. She paused en route at Eniwetok before arriving at Guam on 2 September. Audrain proceeded to Saipan and dropped anchor there on the 10th. She loaded cargo and troops of the 2d Marine Division earmarked for occupation duty in Japan.

The transport sailed for Japan on 18 September. She touched at Nagasaki five days later and landed her forces without incident. On the 26th, A Audrain left Jap an, via Manila, and sailed to Subic Bay, Philippines. She embarked more troops there and reversed her course to Japan. She put these passengers ashore for occupation of Wakayama. On 1 November, the ship arrived back at Manila. She took on military passengers for return to the United States. Audrain touched at Portland, Oreg., on 27 November. She then entered a shipyard there for repairs.

The vessel commenced another voyage to Japan on 26 December. She arrived at Yokohama on 14 January 1946 and debarked troops and supplies. She left Japanese waters on the 27th and set a course for San Pedro via Pearl Harbor. Audrain left California, sailed back to Hawaii in early April, and remained in port at Pearl Harbor for the duration of her naval career. She was decommissioned at Pearl Harbor on 15 May 1946 and was transferred to the Maritime Commission on 25 July 1947 for layup with the National Defense Reserve Fleet group berthed at Suisun Bay, Calif. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947, and the ship was sold on 11 July 1972 to the National Metal & Steel Corp., Terminal Island, Calif., and was subseq quently scrapped.

Audrain won one battle star for her World War II service.


Welcome to AUDRAIN COUNTY, MISSOURI

Audrain County has approximately 26,000 citizens in eight municipalities. Our largest community of Mexico has a population of 11,320 and it is also the county seat. Governance of Audrain County is performed by a County Commission.

Located in central Missouri, Audrain County is a mix of productive farms, rural enterprises, manufacturing companies, biofuel refining, education, and the best of mid-western towns.

Recognized as the Biofuel Capital of Missouri, Audrain County is an established leader in this rapidly growing industry.

In addition, Audrain County and the City of Mexico have welcomed the Missouri Plant Science Center to our region. The Plant Science Center is a joint venture between the University of Missouri-Columbia, the Missouri Technology Corporation, the City of Mexico, and applied industrial agricultural companies. It is anchored by a research-driven private nutraceutical company supplying next-generation soy-based ingredients for health science products.


What Audrain family records will you find?

There are 1,000 census records available for the last name Audrain. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Audrain census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 369 immigration records available for the last name Audrain. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 260 military records available for the last name Audrain. For the veterans among your Audrain ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.

There are 1,000 census records available for the last name Audrain. Like a window into their day-to-day life, Audrain census records can tell you where and how your ancestors worked, their level of education, veteran status, and more.

There are 369 immigration records available for the last name Audrain. Passenger lists are your ticket to knowing when your ancestors arrived in the USA, and how they made the journey - from the ship name to ports of arrival and departure.

There are 260 military records available for the last name Audrain. For the veterans among your Audrain ancestors, military collections provide insights into where and when they served, and even physical descriptions.


Operational history

Audrain (APA-59) was laid down on 1 December 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1852) at Wilmington, Calif., by the Consolidated Steel Corp. launched on 21 April 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Arthur G. Rydstrom acquired by the Navy on 1 September 1944 and placed in commission at San Pedro, Calif., on 2 September 1944, Lt. Comdr. George 0. Forrest in command.

The newly commissioned transport held shakedown training off the southern California coast. In late October, she sailed to San Francisco, Calif., and took on passengers and cargo. On the 21st, Audrain got underway for Manus, Admiralty Islands. While en route the ship developed leaks in the tubes of one boiler and, upon her arrival at Manus on 9 November, began a period of repair work The transport then proceeded to Noumບ, New Caledonia, to embark Army troops for training exercises in preparation for landings on Luzon, Philippine Islands. During December, she held exercises off Noumບ as well as at Guadalcanal and Tulagi, Solomon Islands.

World War II

Audrain participated in two combat operations, the landings at Lingayen Gulf (9 January 1944) and the massive invasion of Okinawa (1 to 9 April 1945).

Audrain got underway on 2 January 1945 with task Group (TG) 77.9 with troops embarked for the assault on Luzon. She anchored in the transport area in Lingayen Gulf on the morning of 9 January and landed her troops without opposition. The unloading was completed by the evening of the 12th, and the transport retired with her task unit to Leyte, Philippine Islands. On the 18th, Audrain shaped a course for Biak, Schouten Islands. There, she took on troops and equipment for transportation to Mindoro, Philippine Islands. She discharged these passengers and their gear on secured beaches in the San Jose area of Mindoro on 9 February and retired to Leyte Gulf.

During the next several weeks, Audrain was involved in training exercises in Philippine waters. On 27 March, the vessel got underway with TG 55.1 for the invasion of Okinawa. She arrived off that island on D day, 1 April, began lowering her boats, and sent them to other transports to assist in landing their assault troops. On the morning of the 3d, Audrain began landing her troops and cargo in the Hagushi area.

She experienced several air attacks while in the area. On 6 June, Audrain opened fire on a lone Japanese "Val" but scored no hits. However, two 40-millimeter projectiles fired by neighboring vessels hit her on the forward bulkhead of the navigation bridge, slightly wounding three members of her crew. The landings were completed on 9 April, and the vessel left the Okinawa area bound for Hawaii. The ship paused at Guam on the 14th to transfer casualties from Okinawa to hospitals ashore, and then she continued on to Pearl Harbor.

Audrain arrived there on 1 May and underwent a 10-day period of voyage repairs. She then sailed on to San Francisco, arriving there on 18 May. The ship entered the yards of Hurley Marine Works, Oakland, Calif., for repairs and alterations. After leaving the yard, the ship took on passengers and cargo for transportation to forward areas. She got underway for Pearl Harbor on 31 May. Following a brief layover in that port, Audrain shaped a course for Leyte. She made stops en route at Eniwetok and Ulithi before arriving at Leyte on 30 June.

The ship discharged her cargo ashore and embarked Navy passengers bound for the United States. She shaped a course back to the west coast via Pearl Harbor and reached San Francisco on the 29th. After discharging her passengers, the transport returned to Hurley Marine Works to undergo repairs and alterations. While she was in the yard, the Japanese capitulated on 15 August. The ship returned to duty on 18 August and got underway for Guam. She paused en route at Eniwetok before arriving at Guam on 2 September. Audrain proceeded to Saipan and dropped anchor there on the 10th. She loaded cargo and troops of the 2d Marine Division earmarked for occupation duty in Japan.

Voyage Home & Decommission

The transport sailed for Japan on 18 September. She touched at Nagasaki five days later and landed her forces without incident. On the 26th, Audrain left Japan, via Manila, and sailed to Subic Bay, Philippines. She embarked more troops there and reversed her course to Japan. She put these passengers ashore for occupation of Wakayama. On 1 November, the ship arrived back at Manila. She took on military passengers for return to the United States. Audrain touched at Portland, Oreg., on 27 November. She then entered a shipyard there for repairs.

The vessel commenced another voyage to Japan on 26 December. She arrived at Yokohama on 14 January 1946 and debarked troops and supplies. She left Japanese waters on the 27th and set a course for San Pedro via Pearl Harbor. Audrain left California, sailed back to Hawaii in early April, and remained in port at Pearl Harbor for the duration of her naval career.

Audrain was decommissioned at Pearl Harbor on 15 May 1946, and transferred to the Maritime Commission 25 July 1947, for laying up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Suisun Bay, California.

Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947, and the ship was sold for scrap 11 July 1972 to the National Metal & Steel Corporation of Terminal Island, California.


Related Research Articles

The second USS Chenango (CVE-28) was launched on 1 April 1939 as Esso New Orleans by the Sun Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, in Chester, Pennsylvania, sponsored by Mrs. Rathbone acquired by the United States Navy on 31 May 1941 and commissioned on 20 June 1941 as AO-31, with Commander W. H. Mays in command.

The second USS Mercy (AH-8) was a Comfort-class hospital ship laid down under Maritime Commission contract by Consolidated Steel Corporation at the Wilmington Yard, Wilmington, California, on 4 February 1943. She was acquired by the US Navy from the Maritime Commission on 25 March 1943 and launched the same day, sponsored by Lieutenant Doris M. Yetter, NC, USN, who had been a prisoner of war on Guam in 1941. She was converted from a cargo ship to a hospital ship by Los Angeles Shipbuilding & Drydock Company, San Pedro, California and commissioned 7 August 1944, with Captain Thomas A. Esling, USNR, in command.

The sixth USS Relief (AH-1), the first ship of the United States Navy designed and built from the keel up as a hospital ship, was laid down 14 June 1917 by the Philadelphia Navy Yard launched 23 December 1919 and commissioned 28 December 1920 at Philadelphia, Commander Richmond C. Holcomb, Medical Corps, USN, in command.

The second USS Solace (AH-5) was built in 1927 as the passenger ship SS Iroquois by the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia. The liner was acquired by the Navy from the Clyde Mallory Steamship Line on 22 July 1940, renamed Solace (AH-5) converted into a hospital ship at the Atlantic Basin Iron Works, Brooklyn, N.Y., and was commissioned on 9 August 1941, Captain Benjamin Perlman in command.

USS Hope (AH-7) was a Comfort-class hospital ship launched under Maritime Commission contract by Consolidated Steel Corporation, Wilmington, California, 30 August 1943 sponsored by Miss Martha L. Floyd acquired by the Navy the same day for conversion to a hospital ship by U.S. Naval Dry Dock, Terminal Island, Calif. and commissioned 15 August 1944, Commander A. E. Richards in command.

USS Haven (AH-12) was the lead ship of her class of hospital ships built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. Laid down as SS Marine Hawk, she was transferred from the Maritime Commission for conversion to a hospital ship, and served in that capacity through the end of the war. She was redesignated APH-112 in June 1946 for participation in Operation Crossroads, returning to her original AP-12 designation in October 1946. Haven participated in the Korean War and eventually ending her military career acting as a floating hospital in Long Beach, California. She was later converted to a chemical carrier and scrapped in 1987.

USS Bullard (DD-660) was a Fletcher-class destroyer of the United States Navy, named for Rear Admiral William H. G. Bullard (1866�).

USS Saranac (AO-74), originally named the SS Cowpens, was a Type T2-SE-A1 Suamico-class fleet oiler of the United States Navy, and the fourth ship of the Navy to bear the name.

USS Bosque (APA-135) was a Haskell-class attack transport built and used by the US Navy in World War II. She was a Victory ship design, VC2-S-AP5. She was named after Bosque County, Texas, United States.

USS Samaritan (AH-10) was a hospital ship that served with the US Navy in World War II. Prior to that, she served as a US Navy transport ship under the name USS Chaumont (AP-5).

USS Pinkney (APH-2) was a Tryon-class evacuation transport that was assigned to the U.S. Navy during World War II. Pinkney served in the Pacific Ocean theatre of operations and returned home safely post-war with six battle stars but missing 18 crew members who were killed in action.

USS Excel (AM-94) was an Adroit-class minesweeper of the United States Navy. Laid down on 19 December 1941 by the Jakobson Shipyard, Inc., Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York, launched on 10 May 1942, and commissioned on 11 December 1942. The ship was reclassified as a submarine chaser, PC-1598 on 1 June 1944.

USS Cahaba (AO-82) was an Escambia-class replenishment oiler acquired by the United States Navy for use during World War II. She had the dangerous but necessary task of providing fuel to vessels in combat and non-combat areas primarily in the Pacific Ocean. For her brave efforts, she received eight battle stars during the war.

USS Cabell (AK-166) was an Alamosa-class cargo ship commissioned by the US Navy for service in World War II. She was responsible for delivering troops, goods and equipment to locations in the war zone.

USS Tryon (APH-1) was laid down as SS Alcoa Courier on 26 March 1941, by the Moore Dry Dock Company, Oakland, California and launched on 21 October 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Roy G. Hunt. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, she was designated for U.S. Navy use and assigned the name Comfort in June 1942. Comfort was renamed Tryon on 13 August 1942, acquired by the U.S. Navy on 29 September 1942, and commissioned on 30 September 1942, with Comdr. Alfred J. Byrholdt in command.

USS Bland (APA-134) was a Haskell-class attack transport acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II for the task of transporting troops to and from combat areas.

USS Oxford (APA-189) was a Haskell-class attack transport acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II for the task of transporting troops to and from combat areas.

USS Audrain (APA-59) was a Gilliam-class attack transport that served with the US Navy during World War II.


Contact Information

Use the button link below to find contact information for Circuit Courts, including Municipal Courts and the Juvenile Office, in Audrain, Montgomery and Warren counties.

Please Note: Accessing this site does not create or constitute, in any manner, an agreement or contract between the Court and the visitor. While some of the information on this site is about legal issues, it is not legal advice.

This collection of legal resources is here as a service for those wishing to find out more regarding local and state ordinances, regulations and laws. Many of these resources are also helpful for those wishing to represent themselves in a court proceeding or another legal matter.

None of these resources should be considered legal advice and you may need to seek legal counsel if you are unable to complete or understand any of the information included here. The 12th Judicial Circuit Court does not control the content on any of these web pages and any specific questions regarding the content on these resources should be directed to the specific website resource.

These are electronic forms developed and approved for use in Missouri courts. Court staff are happy to help you if they can. However, courts staff are allowed to help you only in certain ways since they must be fair to everyone. It's best to learn what court staff can and cannot do for you before you ask for help. You may need to seek legal counsel if you are unable to complete or understand the forms.

Attention Required: If you plan to represent yourself in court in a family law matter (divorce, modification of child custody or support, or paternity), you are required to complete the Litigant Awareness Program. The program will help you understand the Missouri court system and the type of case that interests you. You also will learn about the dangers and duties of representing yourself in court. The program may be helpful for other types of cases as well.


Service history

World War II

At the conclusion of this conversion, Neshoba took her shakedown, a coastal run from San Francisco to San Diego. During this cruise she attained her top speed of 19   kn (35   km/h 22   mph ) . At San Diego, she was committed to Amphibious Training at which time the new boat crews got a feel of their craft. She acted as flagship for Transport Squadron Thirteen whose commanding officer at that time was Commodore John G. Moyer, USN. The training was supposed to last a period of two weeks, but sudden changes in the Pacific Fleet organization made Neshoba ' s entrance on the scene of action imperative and the training was cut short. She proceeded to San Pedro, California, where final repairs and checkups were performed. [4]

Ten days were allotted for this work, then she loaded with a cargo of food at San Francisco and received her first set of combat sailing orders – telling her merely to "Proceed Pearl Harbor". Upon arriving at Pearl Harbor, the cargo was dispatched and its place was taken by a "human cargo" of hundreds of Seabees. Neshoba was instructed to sail for the Philippine Islands, stopping off at Eniwetok, Ulithi, and Palau on the way. After twenty days at sea, Neshoba arrived in Leyte Gulf on 20 February 1945. The Seabees were taken off and brought into Samar Island. While at Leyte Gulf, Neshoba was designated as the flagship of Commander Transport Division Forty Two, Captain Edwin T. Short, USN. Preparations were underway at this time for the eventual invasion and occupation of Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Islands. [4]

Combined with Transport Divisions Forty and Forty-one, they made up Transport Squadron Fourteen commanded by Commodore Richardson, USN. It was decided to hold extensive maneuvers in Leyte Gulf for the ships and troops scheduled to take part in the forthcoming operation. Transport Squadron Fourteen was to carry troops and equipment of the 96th Infantry Division to the assault, so these troops were made subject to the maneuvers in Leyte Gulf. Maneuvers were to last for six days, during which time, two "dry runs" were made on the island of Leyte. Everything worked out as planned, and the high command set the date for the invasion of Okinawa on 1 April, Philippine time. Transport Squadrons Thirteen and Fourteen got underway from Leyte Gulf on 27 March 1945, for the four-day trip north to Okinawa. [4]

Boats from Neshoba were assigned to take in the first six waves of assault troops. Since the landings were virtually unopposed, no casualties were inflicted on the crew, and upon completion of the unloading phase, many transports were ordered by Admiral Richmond K. Turner to return to Pearl Harbor. Captain Short, aboard Neshoba, was named Officer in Tactical Command

The convoy arrived on time at Pearl Harbor on 22 April, and many of the ships received sailing orders for the United States. Neshoba was not among them. Instead, she was ordered by AdComPhibspac to take part in training maneuvers at Maui. OTC for the training schedule was ComTransRon 19. It was during these practice runs that Neshoba achieved the remarkable record of lowering all her boats into the water in the record time of nine minutes. Upon conclusion of these maneuvers, she proceeded back to Pearl Harbor where her new orders read, "REPORT SAN FRANCISCO FOR LOADING". She was on her way early the next day, and 24 May, saw Neshoba passing under the Golden Gate Bridge. Most of the crew took a few days' leave and when they returned, Neshoba was ready to sail again. This time, it was Okinawa with a load of Naval Ship Repair Unit personnel. The first leg of the trip carried her all the way to Eniwetok Island non-stop. Due to unloading difficulties in Okinawa, ships were held at all ports in the Pacific to wait their turn to go there. Neshoba was held for three weeks at Eniwetok. [4]

On 9 July 1945, Neshoba sailed in convoy to Ulithi, then to Okinawa. This trip to Okinawa did not find the same peaceful conditions as prevailed on D-Day. Attacks by kamikazes of the Japanese air forces were in full swing at the time. During the ship's five-day stay there, she was under several air raids, which did not come near the berth, and all hands were relieved when her orders came to depart on 29 July. Once again, it was convoy duty for Neshoba, but one of a very different nature. She was not in a convoy of ships of her type, but was the mother ship to upwards of seventy craft, ranging in size from LST's down to fleet ocean tugs. Captain Mack was in command of this convoy as it set out for Saipan. During the trip, a small, but very annoying typhoon was encountered, but all ships and craft weathered the storm and sailed into Saipan harbor on 6 August. [4]

Army and Navy dischargees were taken aboard as passengers, and on 8 August 1945, Neshoba was told to take to the Pacific. The original orders read to proceed at top speed to San Francisco, but through some change of administrative orders, Neshoba was told to change course and head for Pearl Harbor. This order was carried out, but not for long, because further orders were soon forthcoming with instructions to bypass San Francisco and report to the Thirteenth Naval District, Seattle, Washington. The arrival at Seattle was heralded by a shore-based ovation. Following the debarkation of the passengers, the ship was brought over to the Bremerton Navy Yard for repairs. The yard workers concentrated mostly on the boilers, which were in serious need of attention. Temporary repairs took one week after which the headquarters detachment of the 97th Infantry Division was embarked at Pier Forty-two. [4]

The commanding general aboard was Brigadier General Partridge. Neshoba once again put out to sea with original orders to carry her passengers to Leyte Island in the Philippines. A stop at Pearl Harbor was ordered and Neshoba made her reappearance there on 17 September 1945. Since there were only seven hundred army passengers on board, the Navy found it very convenient to embark an additional seven hundred men – sailors, marines, and Seabees – who were bound for Guam. The ship left Pearl Harbor on 20 September, a three-day stopover was made at Guam to disembark the new passengers, and the ship received her orders to continue with the 97th Infantry on to Yokohama, Japan. [4]

Following her arrival, the troops were disembarked and Neshoba lay at dock, her holds and compartments empty, waiting to receive more passengers. It was during the brief stay in Yokohama that Neshoba was assigned to Task Group 16.12, popularly known in the Navy as "The Magic Carpet". Commanded by Rear Admiral Kendall, USN, in Pearl Harbor, the "Magic Carpet" fleet had the specific duty of moving eligible dischargees from overseas to the United States. [4]

The remaining units of the 43rd Infantry Division were embarked at Pier Four in Yokohama for return to San Francisco over the shortest possible route. The Captain and the Commodore jointly agreed on taking the Great Northern Route, which is about 4,700   mi (7,600   km) , so it cuts off about 2,000   mi (3,200   km) from the southern route. [4]

Upon arriving in San Francisco and debarking troops, Neshoba headed for Mare Island Navy Yard for minor repairs. [4]

Captain Drury and Lieut. Comdr. Davis were relieved of duty by Captain E. J. Sweeney, USNR, and Lt. D. M. Newbern as the executive officer, later promoted to lieutenant commander. Neshoba at this time was in dry dock, its first time, and only five short days were taken in the repairs, before she once more had to be readied for a non-stop voyage to Guam. On this trip the crew expected to celebrate the first birthday of the ship, but it so happened that they crossed the International Date Line, thereby "gaining" a day and skipping 15 November, the ship's "birthday", so the anniversary was celebrated on 16 November. (Neshoba was commissioned on 16 November 1944, so 16 November 1945, was her actual "birthday".) The ship arrived at Guam 23 November, where she was loaded with Marines to carry to China. With the escort of the Haverfield to clear mines in the Yellow Sea, the crew experienced cold weather for the first time and for most of the trip. On 30 November the hook dropped in the Yellow Sea about 20   mi (32   km) from the coast and liberty was granted for all hands in Tientsin. After a short stay in China the orders read once more for statewide and on 5 December, the ship departed for San Diego, California. [4]

Post-war duties

Christmas and New Year's Day were spent tied up at the Destroyer Base in San Diego, awaiting more orders and passengers. They both came, and the ship headed for Guam on 11 January, and arrived on 26 January, debarking troops. After a very short stay in Guam, orders arrived for a return to San Francisco. There it was learned that Neshoba would be put out of active service on 13 March. With a new paint job, sealing of guns, compartments and everything ready for the storeroom, Neshoba, commonly known as the "Mighty N", left Mare Island for Stockton, California. She was to be a "mother ship" for five other ships tied together. [4]


When the Hand That Rocks the Cradle Is Suspicious of the Baby Inside

When you purchase an independently reviewed book through our site, we earn an affiliate commission.

THE PUSH
By Ashley Audrain

Is my child’s behavior normal? It’s a parenting question for the ages, particularly at a time when a certain type of parent (present company included) frets over every childhood quirk, no matter how mundane. Does the preschooler with a predilection for hitting need a professional intervention, or maybe just a taekwondo class? Is the kid who drops naps but not tantrums a future rageaholic? This sort of hand-wringing, at its most extreme, is at the center of Ashley Audrain’s taut, chilling debut novel, “The Push.”

Blythe Connor is reluctant to become a parent — understandably so. Her own mother abandoned her when she was 11, after years of cruelty. Her grandmother, also abusive, departed in a more gruesome way: by hanging herself from a tree in the front yard. Blythe is primed, perhaps even genetically programmed, for maternal struggle. “I think the baby hates me,” she says just days after giving birth to her first child, a daughter named Violet. Their relationship goes downhill from there.

Blythe’s postpartum experience is familiar, and Audrain renders it flawlessly. Breastfeeding isn’t a spontanous success, for one thing a nurse “stood over us and stared at Violet and my huge brown nipple as she tried to latch again.” Blythe struggles to adapt to motherhood and she sees seismic shifts in her relationship to her husband, Fox. Noticeably absent is any sense of joy or wonder. “I was so disappointed she was mine,” Blythe says of Violet. She admits to ignoring her baby’s cries for hours on end.

It would be easy to chalk up these difficulties to postpartum depression if it weren’t for the periodic reminders of Blythe’s traumatic family history, woven through the book in stand-alone chapters. Blythe’s mother hit her and often disappeared for a night or two at a time. Blythe’s grandmother routinely locked Blythe’s mother out of the house after school and once held her head underwater in the bathtub, nearly drowning her.

Audrain nimbly stokes the mystery as to whether nature or nurture is at play in Violet’s increasingly hostile disposition. When a toddler standing near Violet on a play structure falls to his death, Blythe’s suspicions intensify. But Fox, ever protective of their daughter, won’t hear of it. And since Blythe herself is more than a little off-kilter, it’s hard to know whose side to take. She’s a classic unreliable narrator who, after her marriage to Fox collapses, lurks outside his new home and pulls a “Single White Female” move on his new partner.

The book is written almost entirely in the second person as one long missive from Blythe to Fox. It serves both as a post-mortem of their relationship and as an urgent call for him to reckon with Violet’s disturbing behavior.

Audrain has a gift for capturing the seemingly small moments that speak volumes about relationships. While Blythe was in labor with Violet, Fox was “standing two feet away, drinking the water the nurse had brought for me.” And a couple of years later, after Violet’s cries interrupt a sexy shower, their relationship has moved to a phase where Fox “tossed me a towel like my teammate in a locker room.”

Audrain conjures the disintegration of marriage, along with the legacy of intergenerational trauma and the pain of parental grief, so movingly that the extent to which Blythe goes off the rails doesn’t seem that far-fetched — which is saying a lot since it involves donning a wig in order to befriend Fox’s new partner, and then lying pathologically to her. Blythe’s experiences are relatable on one level and full-stop alarming on another, a hallmark of the psychological thriller genre that’s executed with gripping precision here.

Occasionally the second person gets repetitive, and I found myself longing to hear Fox’s voice — or anyone else’s, really. But the chapters examining Blythe’s family’s past provide texture, and the narrative feels more balanced once Fox’s partner is tricked into dishing on their life, even asking Blythe for parenting advice. Finally, someone thinks she’s a good mother.


Jay Leno on His Love for Newport's Historic Mansions and Jazz-Age Cars

So enchanted with Newport, Rhode Island, was Jay Leno, that he bought his nine-acre, 14-bedroom, $13.5 million estate on the spot in 2017, totally on impulse. “My wife and I were driving on Ocean Drive and she said, ‘Look at that house!’” he recalls. At the same time, a gardener happened to be exiting the gate, so Leno jokingly asked his wife if they should find out if it was for sale, turned the car around, and knocked on the door. “They said it was, but it’s not currently listed. So, I said, ‘Get the owner on the phone!’ and I bought it on the spot.”

Hopedene is the private home of Nicholas Schorsch, owner of the Audrain Automobile Collection, who will have his private collection on view.

“Here’s the thing,” Leno says. “You don’t get water in California. Not for anything less than $150 million.” He bought the estate fully furnished, too. “I didn’t have to sit there and look at swatches and be like, ‘Let me see that fabric on the wall.’ I’m not a spontaneous purchase guy, but just living in California, for the price of a condo on Wilshire Boulevard you get a home in Rhode Island.”

Yet, being that Leno is an avid car collector, it makes total sense that he found a dream home in the historic Newport area. The town’s automotive history is extensive: Many call it the birthplace of motor racing, courtesy of Willie K. Vanderbilt and the 1900 Vanderbilt Cup, the first American car race. Now, to celebrate all that history and his love of Newport, Leno is chairing the city’s Audrain’s Newport Concours & Motor Week at the beginning of October. “I tend to like the ’20s and ’30s cars,” says Leno of what he’s most looking forward to. “That’s when the automobile was here to stay. I like that era because anything goes.”

An aerial view of Leno's Newport estate.

Courtesy of Lila Delman Real Estate

Doris Duke's art-filled mansion also has camel-shaped trees (a nod to the real camels she once owned on the property).

From October 3 through 6, over a billion dollars’ worth of rare and vintage cars will gather in the town, and some of the most historic mansions will be open like they never have before. The legendary Breakers (the Vanderbilt mansion located on Ochre Point Avenue) will remove its ropes and barriers for guests of certain events to explore the Loggia, Ballard Room, Dining Room, Music Room, Entrance Hall (where Kenny Loggins is performing), and the Terrace. Elsewhere, Rough Point, the stunning former home of stylish tobacco heiress Doris Duke, will have its gorgeous mother-of-pearl furniture and high windows on display as the Great Hall, Solarium, Music Room, and the lawn hosts guests for cocktails and car viewing. The significant aspect of it all is that Newport has never allowed public events at this scale to happen within these historic homes.

The Breakers, designed by renowned architect Richard Morris Hunt, with interior decoration by Jules Allard & Sons and Ogden Codman Jr., is the main site of Motor Week.

A 1939 Alfa Romeo from the Audrain Automobile Museum will be on display during the event.

Beyond fancy cars and classic New England architecture, the events vary—there’s a private Opus wine event at the National Museum of American Illustration, a John Legend concert at Bill Talbert Stadium, seminars at the Casino Theater, and more. Bugatti, Mercedes-Benz, and Rolls-Royce will be there to showcase one-of-a-kind cars, and Leno believes the event will rival the legendary Pebble Beach Concours dɾlegance.

“I’m from [the Northeast], so I have some history here, which is great,” explains Leno, who was born in New Rochelle, New York, grew up in northeastern Massachusetts, and studied at Emerson College in Boston. "I like New England architecture, and I like the fact that in California you’re never really on the water. There’s your house and then there’s Pacific Coast Highway. Newport is ocean all around. Newport is also one of those places that has that New England attitude—it’s funnier than any place in America. That suspicious ‘What brings you here?’” he says with a laugh. “We moved to Andover, Massachusetts in 1959, and we’re still the new people in town.”


Audrain- APA-59 - History

“Cargo for the fighting troops”

Alex Chavez was born April 24, 1927 in Miami, Arizona. His parents were emigrants from Mexico. His father, Matias, was from the Province of Jalisco and his mother, Josefa, came from the Province of Durango. His father lost his first wife from an influenza epidemic and his mother’s first husband was killed in the revolution. His family was Catholic and at the time of their emigration to the United States, Catholics were extensively persecuted by the Stalinist-leaning, brutal government under the rule of President Plutarco Elias Calles. Calles presided over the worst persecution of Catholics and clergy in the history of Mexico, including the killing of hundreds of priests and clergy.

The Catholics’ formed a resistance group called the Cristeros. They used the symbol of the Virgin of Guadalupe (the Blessed Virgin Mary) as their banner.

The Cristeros’ battle cry was “Viva Cristo Rey” (Long live Christ the King) and “Viva Santa Maria de Guadalupe!”. The rebellion claimed the lives of approximately 90,000 people: 56,882 on the Federal Government side, and 50,000 Cristeros. Approximately 250,000 mostly non-combatants fled to the United States.

The rebellion was ended by diplomatic means, in large part because of the pressure of United States Ambassador Dwight Whitney Morrow, who was the father-in-law of Charles Lindbergh.

The Chavez family members included five children, three boys and two girls. Josefa Chavez passed away at the age of thirty-six when Alex was three years old. His older sister, Carmen, helped their father raise Alex and his siblings. Alex grew up in the town of his birth.

The town of Miami, Arizona was a Western Copper boomtown. Mexican emigrants were recruited by the Copper Mine to work in the smelter and the mine. Matias Chavez obtained employment there upon arriving in Miami. Miami is located near the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation. The town hit its peak in population of 7,693 when Alex lived there as a child. Today, the census states that there are 1,936 residents. Copper mining accounts for the largest number of jobs in Miami, 330 at the smelter and 187 at the mine.

Miami school children were segregated until high school. There were schools for white children and schools for all other ethnic groups. The family spoke only Spanish at home and when Alex first went to school, he could not speak English. He remembers well that if a student spoke Spanish within earshot of a teacher, they had to stand in a corner as punishment. The local YMCA operated the public pool and restricted Mexican children to using the pool only on Saturday and required the payment of a dime to enter.

These were the Great Depression years and Alex, an eight-year old, would go to a government warehouse daily and pick up a quart of milk, bread and a bag of food for his family. High school in Miami fully integrated the students and Alex had the opportunity to meet white children but was still hampered by his poor command of the English language. He did not finish high school but was able to improve his ability to speak English when he got a job at a local gas station. His father, who worked in the copper mine, encouraged him to join the military and leave Miami for greater opportunity and to seek a career that would provide a pension. He attempted to join the Navy at the age of fifteen and was rejected because he was underage.

When he turned seventeen, he was accepted by the Navy and reported to San Pedro, California for basic training on May 6, 1944. After basic training, he received orders to join a newly commissioned transport ship named the USS Audrain (APA-59). The USS Audrain was named for a county in Missouri and was place in commission on September 2, 1944 at San Pedro, California. Lt. Commander George O. Forrest was assigned to command.

By September of 1944 he was sailing out to sea as a new sailor on the USS Audrain towards the war in the Pacific only five months after leaving home. Alex had never even seen a large lake in his life let alone an ocean, prior to sailing off to war in the vast Pacific Ocean!

Navy Department, USS Audrain after-action reports provide the following information:

  • November,1944 loading elements of the 35 th Infantry, 25 th Division, Sixth Army, in preparation for the projected assault landing at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands.
  • January, 1945 troops and cargo were landed on beaches in the San Fabian area, Lingayen Gulf, Luzon P.I. The landings received occasional artillery fire on the beaches and an air attack.
  • Upon arrival at Leyte, the ship proceeded to Biak, Schouton Islands, Netherland East Indies, to load troops and equipment of the 186 th Infantry and transported them to Bubug Point, Mindoro, Philippine Islands.
  • April 1945 orders were received to land embarked troops and equipment of the 24 th Corps headquarters. Several air attacks were experienced while in the area, and many enemy planes were shot down.
  • During the period of 6 to 9 April a total of fifty-two Army and seventeen Navy casualties were received and on the 10 th of April, the ship left Okinawa for Guam, Marianas Islands, where wounded were disembarked.
  • August 1945, the Audrain departed Saipan with cargo and troops of the Second Marine Division for Nagasaki, Japan. One of the bloodiest battles was fought on Saipan and the ship was nicknamed the “Savior of Saipan”.

Government records acknowledge that 3 rd Class Petty Officer, Alex A. Chavez, and his shipmates were exposed to hazardous material. During his military service he was exposed to asbestos while working in the engine room as a fireman and water tender. He and his shipmates were also exposed to radiation for an approximately eighty (80) hour period, aboard the USS Audrain APA 59. The ship was in Nagasaki, Japan, from September 23-26, 1945, and was tied up at Delma Wharf.

Alex was awarded the American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with 2 Battle Stars, WWII Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Medal with Japan Bar, Philippine Liberation Medal with 1 Star, Combat Action Ribbon and Philippine Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon. He received and Honorable Discharge on 20 February 1948.

Upon decommissioning on May 15, 1946, the USS Audrain provided their shipmates with the following salute:

“Now Relieve the Watch” on the USS Audrain

Shipmates, from the 2 nd day of September in the Year of Our Lord 1944, when the USS Audrain was commissioned until the 15 th day of May in the Year of Our Lord 1946, when the USS Audrain was decommissioned, “YOU STOOD WATCH”. During those tumultuous, terrifying years late in World War II, from San Francisco to the Admiralty Islands “YOU STOOD WATCH”. Through good duty, bad duty, long separations, short turnarounds, extended deployments, mid-watches, hot wars, cold showers, water hours and long workdays, all often without praise, comfort, understanding or letters at mail call, “YOU STOOD WATCH” so that Americans and Freedom Loving people around the world could feel safe and secure from tyranny and the evils of an empire bent on conquest and destruction. Before most of us were born…..”YOU STOOD THE WATCH”. On this day, YOU, Our Heroes from the Greatest Generation Stand Relieved. We who stand before you have “ASSUMED THE WATCH”. So with pride and honor, WE RELIEVE YOU, and assume the watch that you so faithfully stood and with the greatest admiration, we thank you!! We wish you the best and send you away with the prayer for the sailor on the seas, “He who sailed Galilee grant you Fair Winds and Following Seas”. Go forth and Never…Never forget that You were…You are…and You always will be, part of the greatest Navy, in the Greatest Country, in history.”

Alex was married to his wife Frances for 68 years when she passed away on September 10, 2016. They have four children, Dave, Ted, Geraldine and Michael and four grandchildren. Alex retired from PG&E as a Steam Driven Electric Power Plant Operator. PG&E records acknowledge that Alex was exposed to asbestos and other possible hazardous material while employed with the Public Utility. At ninety-two years old, he enjoys visiting with his children and grandchildren.


Watch the video: Audrain Auto Museum, Newport, RI (December 2021).