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Heinkel He 111Z

Heinkel He 111Z

Heinkel He 111Z

The He 111Z was the most unusual variant of the aircraft ever developed. It was built to tow the massive Me 321 Gigant glider, which weighted in at 75,000lbs when full. Heinkel’s solution to this problem was to take two He 111H-6s, place them side by side and then connect them with a new central wing section. A fifth engine was placed at the centre of the new central wing, producing a five engined aircraft with two full fuselages, with the seven man crew split between the two sides. The port fuselage carried the chief pilot (and the throttle controls), as well as a mechanic, radio operator and gunner, while the starboard fuselage carried the co-pilot along with a second mechanic and gunner.

The composite aircraft could tow the Me 321 to a target up to 1,000 miles from its start point. It entered service early in 1943 during a mission to re-supply German troops isolated in south west Russia. Only ten He 111Zs were built, before production was cancelled after engines were mounted directly on the Me 321 to produce the Me 323 powered transport aircraft. Only one unit (LLG 2) used the He 111Z, between February 1943 and September 1944, when only two aircraft remained.

Development - Combat - He 111A - He 111B - He 111C - He 111D - He 111E - He 111F - He 111G - He 111H - He 111J - He 111P - He 111R - He 111Z


Heinkel He-111Z

The Heinkel He-111Z was a five engine, twin fuselage aircraft of the Luftwaffe, used to tow large cargo gliders.

With the introduction of the Me-321 Gigant heavy cargo glider in 1940 the Luftwaffe had a need for suitable towing aircraft. To solve the need, two existing bombers were joined by sharing their main wing and adding a center section.

In 1941 the first two prototype Heinkel He-111Z (Zwilling – Twin) aircraft were produced, with a fifth engine added to the center section of the wing.

The glider tug was very successful, well liked by its crews, and enjoyed a trouble free career.

A total of 12 Heinkel He-111Z glider tugs were produced, with eight either shot down or destroyed from bombings. The fate of the remaining four is unclear.

Heinkel He-111Z Specifications
Primary Function:
Crew:
Engines:
Power:
Weight Empty:
Max. Weight:
Length:
Wingspan:
Cruise Speed:
Towing Me-321:
Towing 2 Go-342:
Ceiling:
Range:
Year Deployed:
glider tow
seven
Junkers Jumo
5- V 1,350 hp ea.
47,000 lbs.
53,000 lbs.
53′ 10″
115′ 6″
270 mph
137 mph
155 mph
32,500 feet
1,200 miles
1942

Radio Control Airplane

RC Heinkel He-111Z from Traplet plans.

Radio Control Airplanes:

Pictured above is the rc Heinkel He-111Z from Traplet Publications plans. The radio control airplane was featured in the March 2001 Electric Flight International magazine. Wingspan is 96″. Recommended power can come from five Speed 480 to Speed 600 type geared motors. All up weight will be around 14 lbs.

The first picture below is of a great looking He-111 radio control airplane scratch built by Johnr of the Watt Flyer forum. It has a 100″ wingspan. Power comes from two AXI 4130/16 motors. It weighs about15 lbs.

If you are looking for 3-view drawings to help build your rc Heinkel He-111Z radio control airplane, check out Pic Mosaic.

For those who enjoy building plastic scale models, the next picture down is of the 1/72 scale plastic model built by Bob Bartolacci from an Italiari kit. Bob remarked that the wings and drop tanks take some doing to properly mate with their respective parts. However, Bob reports that the decals are very good.

Pictured last is the 1/72 scale Heinkel He-111Z kit for sale by Hasegawa. Dave Johnson reviewed the kit and found 286 sharply detailed pieces which fit together well. Decals are excellent. He remarks that the kit will not be difficult to build for anyone with prior model building experience.

Please email us if you have built a rc Heinkel He-111Z or if you know of any other sources for it.


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He-111Z-1

The Heinkel He111Z, although representing the last alphabetical subtype, was not really the last He 111 series developed. Development of the He111Z was a direct result of the success of a Messerschmitt design. Messerschmitt had developed a huge cargo glider, the Me321, and there were unfortunately not too many German aircraft in the Luftwaffe that were big and powerful enough to tow it when the Me 321 was fully loaded. Those aircraft capable of doing the job had other duties from which they could not be spared.

An idea was hit upon to take a sturdy airframe already in production and add more power to it, in the form of additional engines, so that it could tow the Me 321. The most obvious way to meet this idea was to develop an existing aircraft further, by extending the wings so that it could hold more engines. The Heinkel staff tackled the problem, but not in the most obvious way. Redesign of an existing aircraft would take a lot of time with testing and production of new and redesigned parts. The Heinkel staff simply took two He111H-6 bombers, cut the starboard wing from the engine to the wingtip off one of them, and the port wing from the engine to the wingtip from the other, added a wing section with an installed engine between the two shortened wings and joined the three parts together. The result was two He 111 fuselages, two tail assemblies, two wings and five big Jumo engines. Since the two fuselages were joined by a common wing, the nickname "twins" stuck, and the He111 variant was given the designation He111Z, for "Zwilling", meaning "twin". The five Jumo engines developed a total of 7,500 horsepower more than enough to tow the huge Me 321 glider.

The design was radical, yet simple and airworthy. It didn't require a great amount of expense for testing, design and retooling. It was flown from the port fuselage by a standard crew and was capable of 270 miles per hour. It was used from 1942 onwards in small numbers to tow both Me321 gliders and Gotha Go 242 gliders. Two fully loaded Go 242s could be towed for almost 1,000 miles. The range was extended by the gliders themselves, once they were cut loose from the He 111Z and allowed to glide in for their landings.

Not really a line-up of Heinkel bombers, but only one aircraft — the giant He111Z glider tug showing off all five of its Jumo 211F-2 engines and huge external belly tanks. This He 111Z has a 20mm MG/FF cannon in its right nose, and an MG15 machine gun in its left nose, from which the aircraft was piloted.

A big He 111Z composite aircraft starts to warm up her five engines on this icy Russian airfield. Already the first, third and fifth engines are slowly turning over. Equally visible are the belly drop tanks, similar to those carried by Bf110s and the typical yellow wingtips and belly bands of aircraft that operated on the eastern front.


Contents

Following the successful career of Ernst Heinkel as the chief designer for the Hansa-Brandenburg aviation firm in World War I, Heinkel's own firm was established at Warnemünde in 1922, after the restrictions on German aviation imposed by the Treaty of Versailles were relaxed. By 1929, the firm's compressed air-powered catapults were in use on the German Norddeutscher Lloyd ocean-liners SS Bremen and Europa to launch short-range mail planes from the liners' decks. [1] The company's first post-World War I aircraft design success was the design of the all-metal, single-engined Heinkel He 70 Blitz high-speed mail plane and airliner for Deutsche Luft Hansa in 1932, which broke a number of air speed records for its class. It was followed by the two-engine Heinkel He 111 Doppel-Blitz, which became a mainstay of the Luftwaffe during World War II as a bomber. Heinkel's most important designers at this point were the twin Günter brothers, Siegfried and Walter, and Heinrich Hertel. The firm's headquarters was in Rostock later known as Heinkel-Nord (Heinkel-North), located in what used to be named the Rostock-Marienehe neighborhood (today's Rostock-Schmarl community, along the west bank of the Unterwarnow estuary), where the firm additionally possessed a factory airfield along the coastline in the Rostock/Schmarl neighborhood roughly three kilometers (1.9 miles) north-northwest of the main offices, with a second Heinkel-Süd engineering and manufacturing facility in Schwechat, Austria, after the Anschluss in 1938.

World War II Edit

The Heinkel company is most closely associated with aircraft used by the Luftwaffe during World War II. This began with the adaptation of the He 70 and, in particular, the He 111, to be used as bombers. Heinkel also provided the Luftwaffe's only operational heavy bomber, the Heinkel He 177, although this was never deployed in significant numbers. The German Luftwaffe equipped both of these bombers with the Z-Gerät, Y-Gerät, and Knickebein, developed by Johannes Plendl, and thus they were among the first aircraft to feature advanced night navigation devices, common in all commercial airplanes today.

Heinkel was less successful in selling fighter designs. Before the war, the Heinkel He 112 had been rejected in favour of the Messerschmitt Bf 109, and Heinkel's attempt to top Messerschmitt's design with the Heinkel He 100 failed due to political interference within the Reichsluftfahrtministerium (RLM — Reich Aviation Ministry). The company also provided the Luftwaffe with an outstanding night fighter, the Heinkel He 219, which also suffered from politics and was produced only in limited numbers, but was the first Luftwaffe front-line aircraft to use retractable tricycle gear for its undercarriage design, and the world's first front-line military aircraft to use ejection seats. By contrast, the only heavy bomber to enter service with the Luftwaffe during the war years – the Heinkel He 177 Greif – turned out to be one of the most troublesome German wartime aircraft designs, plagued with numerous engine fires from both its inadequate engine accommodation design and its general airframe design being mis-tasked, for a 30-meter (100 ft) class wingspan design, to be built to be able to perform moderate-angle dive bombing attacks from the moment of its approval by the RLM in early November 1937, which would not be rescinded until September 1942. [2]

From 1941 until the end of the war, the company was merged with engine manufacturer Hirth to form Heinkel-Hirth, giving the company the capability of manufacturing its own powerplants, including its Heinkel Strahltriebwerke turbojet engine manufacturing firm.

The Heinkel name was also behind pioneering work in jet engine and rocket development, and also the German aviation firm that attempted to popularize the use of retractable tricycle landing gear, a relative rarity in early WW II German airframe design. In 1939, flown by Erich Warsitz, [3] the Heinkel He 176 and Heinkel He 178 became the first aircraft designs to fly under liquid-fuel rocket and turbojet power respectively.

Heinkel was the first to develop a jet fighter to prototype stage, the Heinkel He 280, the first Heinkel design to use and fly with retractable tricycle gear. In early 1942, the photographic interpretation unit at RAF Medmenham first saw evidence of the existence of the 280 in aerial reconnaissance photographs taken after a bombing raid on the Rostock factory. Thereafter, the Allies began intensive aerial reconnaissance intended to learn more about the German jet aircraft programme. [4]

The He 219 night fighter design was the first German frontline combat aircraft to have retracting tricycle gear, and the first operational military aircraft anywhere to use ejection seats. Heinkel's He 280, the firm's only twin-jet aircraft design to fly never reached production, however, since the RLM wanted Heinkel to concentrate on bomber production and instead promoted the development of the rival Messerschmitt Me 262. Very late in the war, a Heinkel single-jet powered fighter finally took to the air as the Heinkel He 162A Spatz (sparrow) as the first military jet to use retractable tricycle landing gear, use a turbojet engine from its maiden flight forward, and use an ejection seat from the start, but it had barely entered service at the time of Germany's surrender.

Slave labour during World War II Edit

Heinkel was a major user of Sachsenhausen concentration camp labour, using between 6,000 and 8,000 prisoners on the He 177 bomber. [5]

Post-war Edit

Following the war, Heinkel was prohibited from manufacturing aircraft and instead built bicycles, motor scooters (see below), and the Heinkel microcar. The company eventually returned to aircraft in the mid-1950s, licence building F-104 Starfighters for the West German Luftwaffe. In 1965, the company was absorbed by Vereinigte Flugtechnische Werke (VFW), which was in turn absorbed by Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm in 1980 and later became part of Airbus.

The company designed a VSTOL aircraft called the Heinkel He 231 (VJ 101A), intended to protect West Germany's airfields against Soviet attack. [6]

Aircraft Edit

    low-wing floatplane (monoplane) improvement on the HE 1 reconnaissance (monoplane) reconnaissance (monoplane) reconnaissance (monoplane)
    bomber + trainer reconnaissance fighter (biplane) reconnaissance + dive bomber (biplane) fighter + close-support (biplane) Heron reconnaissance (biplane seaplane) ship-borne reconnaissance (biplane seaplane) reconnaissance seaplane trainer biplane sports plane "Blitz" (Lightning), single-engine transport + mailplane, 1932 single-seat monoplane Kadett (Cadet), trainer fighter + advanced trainer (prototype) fighter bomber fighter (fictitious alternative designation for He 100D-1) reconnaissance seaplane general-purpose seaplane transport + reconnaissance single-engine high-speed bomber (prototypes), reconnaissance aircraft, 1937 four-engine long-range passenger flying-boat (project), 1938 Spatz (sparrow), Volksjäger (People's Fighter) design competition choice, fighter (jet-engined) trainer (prototype) pioneering liquid-fueled rocket-powered experimental aircraft (prototype) Greif (Griffon), the Third Reich's only long-range heavy bomber world's first jet-engined aircraft Uhu (Eagle-Owl), night-fighter four-engine long-range passenger flying-boat (project), 1939 high-altitude bomber, He 177 development, two prototypes completed post-war in France four-engine bomber project only heavy bomber, paper-only Amerika Bomber He 177 development (by February 1943) with four BMW 801E radial engines, never built four-engine turboprop bomber project only fighter (jet-engined) four-engined bomber (jet-engined project), 1944 , high-speed bomber (He 119 derivative project only), 1944 - He 111 for service with the IJNAS He 112 development for the IJAAS He 100 development for the IJNAS
  • Heinkel P.1054
  • Heinkel P.1062
  • Heinkel P.1063
  • Heinkel P.1064
  • Heinkel P.1065
  • Heinkel P.1066
  • Heinkel P.1069
  • Heinkel P.1070
  • Heinkel P.1071
  • Heinkel P.1072
  • Heinkel P.1074
  • Heinkel P.1075 , A nearly conventional 1944 design, with slightly forward swept wings and contra-rotating propellers at the front. Julia rocket-propulsion point-defense interceptor , fighter (jet-engined) (project) , tailless fighter (jet-engined) (project) , tailless fighter (jet-engined) (project), 1944 , two-engine night-fighter (jet-engined) (project) , all-weather heavy fighter (flying wing design) (jet-engined) , all-weather heavy fighter (flying wing design) (jet-engined), 1945

Microcar Edit

Heinkel introduced the "Kabine" bubble car in 1956. It competed with the BMW Isetta and the Messerschmitt KR200. It had a unit body and a four-stroke single-cylinder engine. [7]

Heinkel stopped manufacturing the Kabine in 1958 but production continued under licence, first by Dundalk Engineering Company in Ireland and then by Trojan Cars Ltd., which ceased production in 1966. [7] [8]

Scooters Edit

Heinkel introduced the "Tourist" motor scooter in the 1950s which was known for its reliability. A large and relatively heavy touring machine, it provided good weather protection with a full fairing and the front wheel turning under a fixed nose extension. The "Tourist" had effective streamlining, perhaps unsurprising in view of its aircraft ancestry, and although it had only a 174 cc (10.6 cu in), 9.5 bhp 4-stroke engine, it was capable of sustaining speeds of up to 70 miles per hour (110 km/h) (official figures 58 miles per hour (93 km/h)), given time to get there.

Heinkel also made a lighter 150 cc (9.2 cu in) scooter called the Heinkel 150. [9]

Mopeds Edit

Heinkel built the Perle moped from 1954 to 1957. [10] The Perle was a sophisticated cycle with a cast alloy unit frame, rear suspension, a fully enclosed chain with part of the chain enclosure integral with the swingarm, and interchangeable wheels. This high level of sophistication came at a high cost. [11] [12] As with most mopeds, it had a two-stroke engine with a displacement of 50cc that operated on a mixture of gasoline and lubrication oil. [13] Approximately twenty-seven thousand Perles were sold. [10]


Heinkel He 111Z - History

The He 111Z Zwilling was basically two standard He 111's joined at the wing and with an additional engine added in between. It was originally designed to tow gliders, in particular the large Messerschmitt Me 321. The He 111Z Zwilling was to replace the previous tow aircraft for the Me 321, which consisted of a trio of Bf 110 heavy fighters flying in a V formation.

Despite its odd appearance, the Heinkel He 111Z Zwilling was rated highly by its pilots. Four aircraft were originally ordered, with a further 10 later being built, along with 5 more constructed from existing standard He 111s.

Powered by five Jumo 211F engines, each producing 1,340 horsepower, the Heinkel He 111Z Zwilling had a range of 2,500 miles, and could tow a Me 321, or the smaller Gotha Go 242 glider for up to ten hours.

In addition to glider towing, a variant capable of carrying four anti-shipping guided missiles, as well as 15,870 lbs (7,200 kgs) of bombs was also built, although it never saw action. A third version, a long-range reconnaissance aircraft, was planned late in the war but never built.

Although the aircraft had two identical fuselages, only the left side fuselage had a pilot. The crew of seven consisted of a pilot, mechanic, radio operator and gunner in the left side, and an observer, mechanic and gunner in the right side fuselage.

Overall the Heinkel He 111Z Zwilling saw very little operational action. It's size meant it could only operate from large airfields, and although it was originally scheduled to assist in an invasion of Malta, and provide supplies during the Battle of Stalingrad, it was never used.


Heinkel He 59

Authored By: Langley Hester | Last Edited: 04/03/2017 | Content ©www.MilitaryFactory.com | The following text is exclusive to this site.

Because of the restrictions heaped upon Germany after the close of World War 1 (1914-1918), its military buildup heading into World War 2 (1939-1945) was mostly handled in secrecy. Tanks were developed under the guise of farming equipment and aircraft were developed under civilian motives. The latter proved the case for the Heinkel 59, a maritime biplane that went on to serve the German military throughout most of the Second World War. 142 of the type were produced with a first flight recorded in September of 1931, a service introduction in 1935, and formal retirement coming in 1944. The He 59 was also a Battle of Britain (1940) veteran.

The Heinkel concern of Germany was established in 1922 during the post-World War 1 years by Ernst Heinkel himself. In the 1930s, the German military was restructuring and growing in its capabilities by a variety of means. At the beginning of the decade, Heinkel was in development of a new biplane to interest the German Navy (Reichsmarine) under the guise (to the watching world) that it was a civilian-minded passenger/cargo hauler. This product became the He 59 and begat both a sea-based floatplane and land-based prototype as the He 59a and He 59b respectively. The land-based b-model product was the first to achieve flight between the two though the sea-based a-model became the definitive form.

The aircraft featured a traditional biplane wing arrangement encompassing an upper and lower wing section braced by a network of struts and cabling. The fuselage was of a generally tubular shape though with slab-style side panels. A dual-engine configuration was accepted and these nacelles were set outboard of the fuselage within the bays of the biplane wing assembly. Open-air cockpits were featured for the standard operating crew of three to four personnel. The tail unit showcased a single vertical fin with low-set horizontal planes. Dimensionally, the He 59 became a relatively large seaplane with a running length of 57 feet, a wingspan of 77.8 feet, and a height of 23.3 feet. The floatplane version held two large pontoons as its undercarriage and these housed fuel stores as well. Overall construction of the aircraft was of fabric, steel, and wood. An internal bomb bay was also fitted.

The German Luftwaffe adopted the He 59 as a torpedo bomber and maritime reconnaissance platform. In time, these roles broadened to also include mine-laying, general transport, search/rescue, and pilot training. A collection of these aircraft were used by the German Condor Legion operating during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the war proving a testbed of sorts for new German equipment such as the famous Messerschmitt Bf 109 monoplane fighter. When World War found Europe once more in September of 1939, the aircraft was again pressed into its base torpedo attack role with mine-laying duties as well. Reconnaissance sorties were peppered throughout its early service career before the line was used in the other listed roles heading into 1942. The Finnish Air Force operated no more than four of the type in the reconnaissance role and this only for a short while in 1943. By 1944, the series had met its technological and operational end - heavily outclassed by new breeds of floatplanes and intercepting monoplane fighters of the enemy.

In practice, the He 59 was regarded as a good handling aircraft though not without fault in its design. The engines - 2 x BMW VI ZU V12 liquid-cooled engines of 660 horsepower each - were deemed underpowered for the airframe and thusly performance was never up to par. Performance specifications included a maximum speed of 137 miles per hour with cruising speeds in the 115mph range. Operational ranges (585 base miles, 950 miles ferry) were another limiting quality that forced reliance on auxiliary fuel tanks for increased service reaches. The aircraft's service ceiling reached 11,480 feet. Armament was another noted deficiency of the product - 3 x 7.92mm MG 15 machine guns were used in defensive positions at the nose, dorsal, and ventral areas. The offensive-minded bomb load equaled 2,200lb of conventional drop bombs or a single 1,764lb torpedo. Generally slow and plodding, the He 59 could easily fall victim to Allied fighters or warships happening to come across it.

Heinkel built several variants of its He 59 product led by the He 59a and He 59a "one-off" prototypes. He 59A were fourteen test aircraft He 59B-1 served as sixteen preproduction mounts. The He 59B-2 was an improved form and He 59B-3 became a reconnaissance minded variant. He 59C-1 was an unarmed trainer followed by He 59C-2 as an Air-Sea rescue aircraft outfitted with appropriate equipment. He 59D-1 was a "combination" mark that included the facilities and functionality of both the C-1 and C-2 variants. He 59E-1 was a dedicated torpedo bomber trainer and He 59E-2 a reconnaissance trainer. Similarly He 59N served in navigation training and were converted through a stock of existing He 59D-1 airframes.


Heinkel He 111 Z-1

Později byly kulomety typu MG 15 nahrazeny účinnějšími kulomety MG 81 nebo MG 131.

One flexible forward-firing 0.79 inch MG FF cannon in the bow position in right fuselage,
one flexible forward-firing 0.31 inch MG 15 machine-gun in the bow position in left fuselage,
one flexible rearward-firing 0.51 inch MG 131 machine-gun in the dorsal positions in both hulls,
one flexible rearward-firing 0.31 inch MG 15 machine-gun in the ventral positions in both hulls,
one flexible rearward-firing 0.31 inch MG 15 machine-gun in the side positions in both hulls.

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Německý pětimotorový vlečný letoun He 111 Z-1 zcela jistě patřil k velmi nevšedním letounům, které používala německá Luftwaffe. Za jeho vznikem stál generál Ernst Udet, který při pracovní návštěvě továrny Ernsta Heinkela v Rostoku, dostal nápad spojit dva letouny He 111 a v místě spojení přidat pátý motor. Tak velký vlečný letoun potřebovala Luftwaffe pro své obrovské kluzáky Messerschmitt Me 321, ty pro svůj let dosud potřebovaly trojspřeží Messerschmittů Bf 110, což však byla značně riziková záležitost. Profesor Heinkel se tohoto nápadu ujal a na podzim roku 1941 již vzlétl první ze dvou prototypů He 111Z V-1 "Zwilling" (Dvojčata).

Vlečný letoun He 111 Z vznikl spojením dvou letounů He 111 H-6, spojeny byly pouze křídlem, ocasní plochy zůstaly zachovány, stejně jako kompletní podvozky obou původních letadel. Spojení křídel, nebylo určitě jednoduchou záležitostí, jak by se na první pohled zdálo, celá vnitřní část křídel musela být nově přepracována, původní vzepětí muselo být odstraněno a původní eliptické křídlo bylo napojeno na nový obdelníkový centroplán s pátým motorem. První pilot seděl v levém trupu a ze své kabiny ovládal všech pět motorů, řízení a podvozek své poloviny, druhý pilot ze své kabiny v pravém trupu ovládal řízení a podvozek své poloviny. V levé polovině byl ještě mechanik, střelec, a letovod, v pravém trupu byl vedle druhého pilota ještě mechanik a střelec.

Zkoušky obou prototypů V-1 a V-2 proběhly hladce a takřka bez problémů, což je obdivuhodné již jen s ohledem na vedení spousty táhel řízení letounu a ovládání motorů.
Na samém konci roku 1941 objednala Luftwaffe stavbu deseti sériových letadel, továrna Heinkel A. G. na jaře roku 1942 dodala poslední z nich, tyto letouny byly sestaveny z komponentů He 111 H-6 a He 111 H-16. Každý letoun měl zřejmě odlišnou výzbroj, ta se ostatně měnila během operační činnosti.
Heinkel He 111 Z-1 vzlétl i s Messerschmittem Me 321 v závěsu za pomocí až šesti raketových motorů Walter. "Zwilling" často tahal i dva nákladní kluzáky Gotha Go 242. Pro dlouhé přelety bylo možno podvěsit pod oba trupy letounu celkem čtyři přídavné palivové nádrže po 900 litrech, celková zásoba paliva potom činila 8 250 litrů.

Vlečné letouny spolu s kluzáky Me 321 Gigant byly poměrně dlouho na základně ve Francii, kde se připravovala operace Herkules, což mělo být obsazení ostrova Malta, později probíhaly přípravy na obsazení Astracháně a Baku, v lednu 1943 měly pomoci se zásobováním německých vojsk u Stalingradu, nakonec se zúčastnily zásobování německého předmostí na Kubáni, na zpáteční cestu odvážely raněné vojáky, vlečný letoun pojal 30 vojáků a kluzák sto i více. Na jaře 1943 byly tyto letouny staženy do Německa a později zase do Francie. Nějakou dobu se uvažovalo o výsadkové operaci na Sicílii, ale k té již nedošlo, protože zde nebyla vhodná letiště. Jednotka „Zwillinge“ byla rozpuštěna v roce 1944, v té době měla ve výzbroji pouhé čtyři letouny He 111 Z.


Watch the video: Гигантский Heinkel 111 Zwilling! Сиамские Близнецы Третьего Рейха (January 2022).